Poll: What do you think
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View poll results: What do you think
I agree entirely
1 11%
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5 56%
I disagree somewhat
1 11%
I disagree entirely
2 22%
It depends...
0 0%
Voters: 9.
#1
Does anyone else believe that you can mix on just about anything decent as long as you learn and adapt to what your setup sounds like and get a feel for what a good mix sounds like on your setup? I am curious of what people think.
an example would be if you had cheap or decent set studio monitors or just a nice set of speakers to mix and master with, could you mix as good with them rather than you would with a much better pair of monitors because you have learned how to mix with the monitors you have?
#2
i was thinking, Andy Sneap could probably do a pretty good job with nothing but the speakers i have. but then it occurred to me that maybe he wouldn't be that great if all he's ever mixed with were subpar systems. in other words, you need decent equipment to develop a sense of what to listen for while mixing.

but then again, i've never done a good mix so what do i know
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#3
No - sometimes you have nulls or boosts in certain frequency ranges due to a poor setup / poor room condition/treatment. Its impossible to compensate for these types of problems, because you literally cant hear the frequency or it is way overpowered and it affects the whole overall timbre of the mix. When you have these problem, you have to rely on other speakers (headphones or a car stereo system) to help you hear what youre missing.

also, if you are using cheap ass speakers, you probably arent getting good low end extension (below 100hz or even 150hz maybe)- these are frequencies that make or break your mix, and if you cant hear them you cant mix them.

So no, in my opinion, you cant 'learn' speakers that have holes in frequencies ranges or cant reproduce enough lows or highs. You will need other speakers to check your mix on, or you will need nice monitors and most importantly a very nice sounding and even room.

Edit: that being said, I dont want to discourage somebody who cant afford all of this shit and prevent them from mixing. A bad setup can still take you about 70-80% of the way if you have a solid understanding of mixing fundamentals and you have a good ear. These are things that you can improve by practicing, even if your room or speakers suck. If you make a mix sound good IN YOUR ROOM, you still accomplished something. It may not translate well universally, but thats not something I would beat yourself up over. All that means is that when the day comes that you DO use a very flat and hi fidelity setup, you will be able to make your mix sound good in your room and elsewhere.
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#5
Decent modern mixing speakers are cheap enough. Holes in the room, on the other hand, not so much
#6
There is going to be a minimum quality of monitoring environment that can yield good mixes. I would think it's pretty impossible to mix accurately using iPod headphones, for example.

I can think of at least one mixing engineer who uses fairly midrange speakers in an un-treated room, but he has mixed platinum records. So it can be done, you just have to know your gear inside and out. And reference on everything you possibly can.
#7
Quote by Random3
There is going to be a minimum quality of monitoring environment that can yield good mixes. I would think it's pretty impossible to mix accurately using iPod headphones, for example.

I can think of at least one mixing engineer who uses fairly midrange speakers in an un-treated room, but he has mixed platinum records. So it can be done, you just have to know your gear inside and out. And reference on everything you possibly can.


QFT.

By the way, the mix engineer Charlie's talking about? Pretty certain he's talking about Joey Sturgis.
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#9
You know I'm an admin on JSF? haha
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#11
Yep!
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#12
For about 20 years I used a pair of JBL Studio Series monitors (don't remember the modal number but I still have them). They had 10" woofers and pumped out quite a lot of low bass that often sounded muddy. I bought them when a studio I worked at upgraded the monitors in their smaller mixing suite. While my home studio was really a dead room (carpeted walls and floor with acoustic ceiling panels- old school thinking) I was still unhappy with the mixes I was creating (8 track analog). I started sending my main mixer outputs into an EQ before going to my Crown amp and out to the JBL monitors. I adjusted this "master" EQ over a period of months to compensate for the JBL's deficiencies. This worked OK for many years but I still wasn't happy and it seriously affected my development in learning about EQ and mixing. There was always doubt. 10 years ago I finally decided to get a pair of good active monitors. What a difference.

I know using less expensive speakers, monitors or headphones or anything other than a decent set of monitors can be done but it takes a lot more work and faith in your abilities to recognize and compensate for the monitors flaws. I know we all have to work with what we have but if you can save a little and get some nice active monitors it's really worth it. Next to the digital mixers and boards in a pro studio the next biggest hardware expense is usually the monitor speakers. There is a very good reason for that.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jun 21, 2016,