#1
Hi guys,
I'm using a Cort Earth Grand Cf Op which is a semi acoustic guitar.
I wanted to replace strings all by myself for the first time.
I wanted to try out 11 gauge as I have been paying 12 since quite a while.
I got Ernie Ball Beefy Slinky 2627 and also strung my guitar with the same.
Then noticed that they are electric strings.
Is it fine now, or will it cause any issues. Please guide me.
#3
Quote by Tony Done
No problem if you like the tone. Electric strings often sound a bit dull to me on acoustic guitars, but I use them (13-56) on my resos.

I personally think that 11s are too light for acoustic, they aren't heavy enough to drive the top. But each to his own.


Thanks buddy for your reply.
Not like i didnt like the tone, but I am not getting that feel which I used to get in D'Addario EXP16.

I planned on going back to old strings, but definitely not now. I have spend around 400 rupees; Will stay with it for 2 more months atleast.
#4
Quote by thunderstorm29
Thanks buddy for your reply.
Not like i didnt like the tone, but I am not getting that feel which I used to get in D'Addario EXP16.

I planned on going back to old strings, but definitely not now. I have spend around 400 rupees; Will stay with it for 2 more months atleast.
Actually steel electric strings have less tension partly due to the way they're gauged, and partly because phosphor bronze is quite stiff as well. "80/20 Brass", (what some would call "bronze" (plain bronze, not phosphor bronze) play a tiny bit easier than PB, in the same gauge. 80/20 alloy is brighter than PB, and some guitars seem to like that.

In any case, an old nickel alloy, "monel" is making a bit of a comeback for acoustics as well. Since nickel is a magnetic material , (neither brass or bronzes are),, these can be used with sound hole magnetic pickups to great effect. These strings are supposed to be somewhere between PB, (least bright), and brass, (most bright), in the tonal spectrum.

Putting lighter strings on a guitar can sometimes force you to make a very slight adjustment in the "truss rod". as oftentimes when tension is taken off the neck, it may bend backwards a slight bit, causing all the "relief" to go away, and fret buzz can happen. This isn't "damage" in any sense, it's just the materials adjusting to one another in a very normal way.
#5
Quote by Captaincranky
Actually steel electric strings have less tension partly due to the way they're gauged, and partly because phosphor bronze is quite stiff as well. "80/20 Brass", (what some would call "bronze" (plain bronze, not phosphor bronze) play a tiny bit easier than PB, in the same gauge. 80/20 alloy is brighter than PB, and some guitars seem to like that.

In any case, an old nickel alloy, "monel" is making a bit of a comeback for acoustics as well. Since nickel is a magnetic material , (neither brass or bronzes are),, these can be used with sound hole magnetic pickups to great effect. These strings are supposed to be somewhere between PB, (least bright), and brass, (most bright), in the tonal spectrum.

Putting lighter strings on a guitar can sometimes force you to make a very slight adjustment in the "truss rod". as oftentimes when tension is taken off the neck, it may bend backwards a slight bit, causing all the "relief" to go away, and fret buzz can happen. This isn't "damage" in any sense, it's just the materials adjusting to one another in a very normal way.

Oh. Unfortunately i don't know how to adjust a truss rod. And I'm afraid to adjust it too
#6
Well, first keep in mind I meant you MAY have to adjust it. It certainly isn't a foregone conclusion. OTOH, some guitars, (particularly those with thin necks), may require a very slight seasonal adjustment to have their action(s) remain exactly how you like it.

Usually these adjustments are very slight, on the order of a 1/8th to at most,1/2 turn.

So, are you at least willing to learn about a valuable new skill today? If so, here's the best guide I've been able to find about acoustic guitar setup:
http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html

Mr Becker covers the topic completely, from how to measure what you have in the way of action, to how to get to a point where it would be better for your style of play.

I always say this, if you read the guide, but still don't know, or want to, make the adjustments yourself, it will still make it easier for to to explain what you'd like done to your friendly, neighborhood guitar technician!
#7
Quote by Tony Done
. . . No problem if you like the tone. Electric strings often sound a bit dull to me on acoustic guitars, but I use them (13-56) on my resos. . . . .


Yes ^ ^ ^ ^ no problem at all. Like Tony I use a set of electric strings on one of my acoustic guitars. It's fitted with a magnetic sound-hole pickup so I use the nickel-plated steel strings to get a better response when playing through an amplifier.
#8
Quote by Garthman
It's fitted with a magnetic sound-hole pickup so I use the nickel-plated steel strings to get a better response when playing through an amplifier.


That's the reason I use them on the resos - they are fitted with electric guitar type magnetic pickups, which I prefer to piezos. The flattops have soundhole pickups either designed or modded for acoustic strings.
#10
Quote by thunderstorm29
So much of great info. Thank you very very much guys

Gonna try out truss rod adjustment soon


You're welcome.

Don't be afraid of adjusting the truss rod - it's a very simple job.