#1
I recently got this guitar from a trade.

I think it is a Carvin DCM400 Custom Shop guitar. I don't know much about Carvin, but I'm really blown away by the sound as well as the quality of build.

Anyone knows more about this guitar?

Here is a test drive of the tone:




#2
It's not a DCM400, near as I can tell. Those have multiple pickups, active/passive controls, etc.
It's a DC127 with a single pickup and a Floyd. It's relatively recent (the diamond inlays). If the case doesn't say Carvin on it (I'm guessing doesn't), it's a non-original case.

There's not much else that can be told from the photos (it's likely an M22SD pickup). Everything from Carvin comes from the custom shop; there are no stock guitars, since about 1990. Carvin can likely tell you the year based on the serial number, and they may be able to tell you what the body/neck woods are at the same time.
#3
sweet
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#4
Quote by dspellman
It's not a DCM400, near as I can tell. Those have multiple pickups, active/passive controls, etc.
It's a DC127 with a single pickup and a Floyd. It's relatively recent (the diamond inlays). If the case doesn't say Carvin on it (I'm guessing doesn't), it's a non-original case.

There's not much else that can be told from the photos (it's likely an M22SD pickup). Everything from Carvin comes from the custom shop; there are no stock guitars, since about 1990. Carvin can likely tell you the year based on the serial number, and they may be able to tell you what the body/neck woods are at the same time.
dspellman

There isn't really a serial number on this guitar on the exterior. The case does say Carvin. Is M22SD a high output pickup? Then that sounds about right.

The previous owner mentioned to me it is a custom shop Carvin DCM400, for which only 2 in the world were built. Do you mean all Carvin are custom shop guitars?
#5
Yeah Carvin only does "semi-custom" guitars, meaning that you more or less can do whatever you want to one of their shapes within the wide boundaries of options available.

The DCM400 is a particular body shape they do and I don't think that is it...
#6
It looks to me like a DC125. If it was built recently, it would be a DC 127 with an option 50 single humbucker. You can look on the Carvin Museum and browse past Carvin Catalogs.

Whichever it is, it's hot. I really like it.
Last edited by chilirainbow at Jun 21, 2016,
#9
Congrats

Looks sweet HNGD Rock On!
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

Last edited by Evilnine at Jun 24, 2016,
#10
Awesome
Ibanez Rg 321mh
Squier Classic Vibe 1970s Precision Bass
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Behringer Truth B2030A
#11
Quote by yulinzm
dspellman

There isn't really a serial number on this guitar on the exterior. The case does say Carvin. Is M22SD a high output pickup? Then that sounds about right.

The previous owner mentioned to me it is a custom shop Carvin DCM400, for which only 2 in the world were built. Do you mean all Carvin are custom shop guitars?


Carvin serial numbers for these guitars usually show up on the jackplates. If not there, then on the fretboard, and if not there, on the control cavity cover (this is usually only on maple-fretboard guitars, however). Carvin didn't spend a lot of time putting together a database of serial numbers, but they can usually tell generally when the guitar was built and, in some cases, what it was made of.

Since about 1990, all Carvins are one-offs. There are really no "production" Carvins since then, but the DC125 was a production model when there were (late '80's). As as been mentioned above, it's likely a DC125C or DC127 with the single pickup option. The 400 series guitars came with exotic woods (flamed koa, etc.) and complicated electronics. Not the case with yours.

Yours has optional diamond inlays, which suggests it's relatively recent (I'm not sure when they became available). Carvins are available with a number of headstocks, including the "reverse tilted pointy" on yours, and the color is definitely Ferrari Red.

There may be some indication on the back of the pickup what it is, but the M22SD was the most popular for that guitar (about 13K output, alnico V). If it is an M22SD, it will have 22 pole pieces, all of which are adjustable with an allen wrench. There are other M22 pickups, but for a fire-breather guitar like that one, the "-SD" version would have been the only sane option. FWIW, I have an old late-80s DC150 with an M22SD in the bridge position and a DC135 (about 1993, 3 pickups) with an M22SD in the bridge. I think my late-80's V220 may also have an M22SD.

Here's a DC125 (with a different headstock choice) for reference. Look familiar?

Last edited by dspellman at Jun 24, 2016,
#12
dspellman

Thank you, that was very informative.

From their website the DC 125 is around $800. This is lower than half of the price of my ESP Standard Series guitars. I can probably say it beats my ESPs in build quality and sound.

This is my first experience with Carvin and I'm very impressed.
#14
Quote by dspellman
Carvin serial numbers for these guitars usually show up on the jackplates. If not there, then on the fretboard, and if not there, on the control cavity cover (this is usually only on maple-fretboard guitars, however). Carvin didn't spend a lot of time putting together a database of serial numbers, but they can usually tell generally when the guitar was built and, in some cases, what it was made of.

Since about 1990, all Carvins are one-offs. There are really no "production" Carvins since then, but the DC125 was a production model when there were (late '80's). As as been mentioned above, it's likely a DC125C or DC127 with the single pickup option. The 400 series guitars came with exotic woods (flamed koa, etc.) and complicated electronics. Not the case with yours.

Yours has optional diamond inlays, which suggests it's relatively recent (I'm not sure when they became available). Carvins are available with a number of headstocks, including the "reverse tilted pointy" on yours, and the color is definitely Ferrari Red.

There may be some indication on the back of the pickup what it is, but the M22SD was the most popular for that guitar (about 13K output, alnico V). If it is an M22SD, it will have 22 pole pieces, all of which are adjustable with an allen wrench. There are other M22 pickups, but for a fire-breather guitar like that one, the "-SD" version would have been the only sane option. FWIW, I have an old late-80s DC150 with an M22SD in the bridge position and a DC135 (about 1993, 3 pickups) with an M22SD in the bridge. I think my late-80's V220 may also have an M22SD.

Here's a DC125 (with a different headstock choice) for reference. Look familiar?



I know for a fact that's a modern DC125C, because of the re-issued pointed headstock, the diamond inlays which were not offered on the original run, Sperzel locking tuners and the small black logo. None of those were offered in their original run back in the 80's.
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
Pro Tools 9

Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
Last edited by RBM01991 at Jun 27, 2016,
#15
Quote by RBM01991
I know for a fact that's a modern DC125C, because of the re-issued pointed headstock, the diamond inlays which were not offered on the original run, Sperzel locking tuners and the small black logo. None of those were offered in their original run back in the 80's.


There was never an "original run," or even a "run" at all. These have been built continuously for anyone who ordered them. The diamond inlays are the real giveaway that it's modern. The Sperzels have been around since the early '90's, the "tilted pointy" headstock was actually available even when it was supposed to have been discontinued. I have one on a '91 guitar. The small logo has been around since the early '90's.
#16
Quote by dspellman
There was never an "original run," or even a "run" at all. These have been built continuously for anyone who ordered them. The diamond inlays are the real giveaway that it's modern. The Sperzels have been around since the early '90's, the "tilted pointy" headstock was actually available even when it was supposed to have been discontinued. I have one on a '91 guitar. The small logo has been around since the early '90's.


No...The original run was from 1986-1993. The DC125 was resurrected about 8-9 years ago IIRC due to popular demand. In its official capacity it was its own model and not just a DC127 with the neck pickup removed. The Sperzels were around from 1992 till about...2012 IIRC. I know because I ordered mine in 2010. They're gone in favor of the Carvin locking tuners now. The headstock is a re-issue of the early 90's headstock but that's kind of irrelevant. All my sources are from the Carvin museum and old catalogs I have laying around.
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
Pro Tools 9

Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
#17
Quote by RBM01991
No...The original run was from 1986-1993. The DC125 was resurrected about 8-9 years ago IIRC due to popular demand. In its official capacity it was its own model and not just a DC127 with the neck pickup removed. The Sperzels were around from 1992 till about...2012 IIRC. I know because I ordered mine in 2010. They're gone in favor of the Carvin locking tuners now. The headstock is a re-issue of the early 90's headstock but that's kind of irrelevant. All my sources are from the Carvin museum and old catalogs I have laying around.


I know. But I've been down at the factory often enough to know that a lot of things happened that didn't appear in the Museum website or any of the old catalogs.
For example, the LS-175 was supposed to have been a 25.5" neck-through guitar with three single coil pickups and a strat-shaped body beginning in 1991 (like your ST300C shape, but with a 25.5" scale instead of 25" and 22 frets rather than 24). It was so badly received that Carvin discontinued it almost immediately and it was not supposed to have been available any other way. However, I have both a V220 and a DC-145-style HSH superstrat (the latter done in solid koa) that were built using the leftover necks, and some of those leftover necks were actually found in new guitars that wandered out of the factory as late as 1993.

I have two DC-150s that were built with neck-through construction just after they were supposedly discontinued as set-neck guitars (and while the DC-150 was resurrected as a guitar name, the guitar was completely different).

Moreover, the DC-150 (old version) was never supposed to have been part of the "custom shop" business, but one of mine has a koa neck and body with a flame maple cap and abalone inlays with an HSH pickup configuration, while the other has an arrowhead headstock (V-type) with active pickups and a Kahler trem.

The DC-125 was never actually unavailable; they just pulled its name as a separate model. Jeff Kiesel just announced a similar streamlining of the guitar line; most of the same options will be available, but not listed as separate models just because the configuration is slightly different. Carvin has had a number of three-pickup guitars, including the DC-135 and the DC-145, and the formal naming convention included a fixed control setup (the DC-135 originally had three single-coil-size pickups with individual switches, one for each pickup, while the DC-145 was an HSH guitar with a five-way). Eventually the whole mix and match thing just made the individual naming silly (though there are still some out there).

For years I tried to get another guitar with this paint job, and was told it didn't exist and/or couldn't be done, until I walked it into the factory: