#1
I was playing around with some arpeggios for fun and played 2 minor arpeggios half steps apart and I really like the sound, gives it somewhat of a creepy vibe. Also it seems to resolve well. Example Emin triad and the playing D# minor triad then returning to Emin again. Is there any theory behind this sound? or is each arpeggio viewed as it's own key? to my ears it seems the D#min seems to resolve well to the Emin. It has the same feel as playing a bb7dim arpeggio a half step down up to the tonic.
#2
1) You're only ever in one key at one time.
2) D# is leading tone to E, resolves naturally upwards.
3) bb7dim? D#dim7 in E (D# F# A C) would be viio7 or seven diminished 7th. The number should not precede the quality of the chord.
#4
It's usually called side-stepping, playing something, then playing it a halfstep away (some may say "play out") then bringing it back in. It is a really common thing to do on static chords or to create tension.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#5
hey guys, very cool examples
To my ears what I played was more on the metal context, although it's the same thing musically. I'm not sure how it'd fit in a chord progression. As in E min to D#min back to Emin? I think it sounds cool but can't really come up with a theoretical context. Any ideas?

2) D# is leading tone to E, resolves naturally upwards.
-I got that part, i'm just wondering why playing a min triad instead of a Diminished7th still sounds good to my ears.
3) bb7dim? D#dim7 in E (D# F# A C) would be viio7 or seven diminished 7th. The number should not precede the quality of the chord.
-Sorry, I didn't spell it out correctly, but thanks for the info learned something new
#6
Guitar uses less function and more shape economy. Minor and diminished chords (with the same root) share two notes (1-b3), with the only difference being 5 (diminished or perfect). It's rather similar to what happens with the Neapolitan chord (b2-4-b6) as opposed to iio (2-4-b6), it just gives a different color.