#1
Hello guys.Today I have a kind of silly question for you...
My local shop offers second hand instruments in good condition for very low prices.
Should I buy a low-end guitar PROVIDED THAT IT FEELS GREAT for me and spend even 750$ to upgrade it ?
I was thinking of buying a guitar and upgrade with :
- Floyd Rose Original
- High-end guitar pickups (depend on the guitar woods)
- Refinish it
- Add new frets (even change their size if neccessary)
- Have it set up professionally + woodwork (routing) + refinishing all by professionals

Also what made me come up with this idea is that I would like to customize a guitar and start experiment with hardware etc. to find out what
fits me the most rather than buying a guitar and end up selling it

What's your opinion

Thanks
#2
Yo can find a brand new guitar with a lot of those specs for $750.
If you want to learn about guitar building and maintenance, go for it. It will not be worth what you put into it in the long run if you ever want to sell it.
For example, if you buy a bottom end fender squire, and drop $750 of upgrades and work into it, it will still be worth as much as a bottom end fender squire if you want to sell it someday.

If you want a dynamite player that you customized yourself and plan on keeping it forever, go for it.

The other option is buying parts from someplace like Warmoth, finishing it, and assembling it to your specs.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#3
Quote by ryanbwags
The other option is buying parts from someplace like Warmoth, finishing it, and assembling it to your specs.


I was thinking of this too but I've heard that the chances are 50% to be flawless,perfect but the other 50% to be horrible,terrible because
parts didnt mix well together
#4
If you buy the body and neck from the same place, it should be fine. All other hardware is pretty standard.
I've done a similar thing a couple times now with success every time.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#5
The downside of modding and bitsa building is that you lose a lot on resale. If you don't mind that, then go ahead by all means. I've done enough modding to know how to get something decent for not much money, but I've invested a lot in tools, time and not-so-successful projects. It I wanted a high end bitsa, it would be based on Warmoth parts. The only adverse comment you see about them is that the frets might not be level (mine were), but that wouldn't worry me, I would fix them myself.
#6
no
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
As I was searching guitar bodies in warmoth's page I noticed that even the blank (routed) body is suitable for 25 1/2 scale lenght as it's said is the standard options
http://www.warmoth.com/Pages/CustomBody.aspx?style=49

My question now, I prefer smaller scale lenght necks...would a 24.75 neck fit in the neck pocket of the body ?
Last edited by DHF1234 at Jun 23, 2016,
#8
The scale length has less to do with the neck pocket and more to do with distance from the 12th fret to the bridge. you just need to look at neck heel measurements. If you don't buy it from Warmoth, it may not fit without some sanding and tweaking.
If you're not using a 25.5 scale neck, don't have them rout the bridge, or see if they will rout it for a 24.75 scale neck. They are a custom shop, after all. An email or phone call may be in order.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#9
If I do not have them rout the bridge because it needs to be routed in some
different way, the pickups' placement won't be affected too ?
#10
Quote by DHF1234
If I do not have them rout the bridge because it needs to be routed in some
different way, the pickups' placement won't be affected too ?

The only thing that can change the position of the pickups relative to the guitar's scale length is if the scale length changes. So assuming that the new bridge perfectly intonates (as did the old one) then no.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
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Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jun 23, 2016,
#11
Quote by DHF1234
Hello guys.Today I have a kind of silly question for you...
My local shop offers second hand instruments in good condition for very low prices.
Should I buy a low-end guitar PROVIDED THAT IT FEELS GREAT for me and spend even 750$ to upgrade it ?
I was thinking of buying a guitar and upgrade with :
- Floyd Rose Original
- High-end guitar pickups (depend on the guitar woods)
- Refinish it
- Add new frets (even change their size if neccessary)
- Have it set up professionally + woodwork (routing) + refinishing all by professionals



No.

Almost always a very bad idea, and worse because you don't know much about guitars yet.

Buy the most lightly used, well set up example of the best guitar you can afford that has the bits and pieces you really want. I tend to ignore the finish (unless it's really nasty), because those things go in and out of fashion anyway. You can find things like Carvin custom-built guitars for relatively cheap NOT because they're bad guitars, but because they're custom, and because the audience for a specific guitar with a specific set of options tends to be fairly small. I've snagged some amazing guitars by buying what other guitar players are unaware of (it's not a guitar center "usual suspect").

1. Don't Fear The Floyd. You don't need a Floyd Rose Original on every guitar. I have a lot of them, but I also have quite a few cheaper Floyds. The Conventional Intertoobs wisdom is that the FRO is made of "better materials." I've been using a couple of old "licensed" Floyds that were first installed in 1992, and are still going strong. I have replacements sitting on the shelf for when/if they go down, but haven't pulled one yet. I DO like the big brass sustain blocks (they're in the $30 range) on a lot of them, but that's a lot cheaper than spending over $200 if you don't need to.

2. "High-End Guitar Pickups" are way too often no better than what comes standard, and only slightly different. Don't assume that because you pull out a couple of bills to buy a set of SDs, DiMarzios, Arcanes, Fralins, Kinmans, Bare Knuckes, etc., that you're necessarily going to have something that sounds better. It's often a *down*grade to replace pickups, and then you've spent big bucks for the name on the pickups and little real improvement.

3. Refinishing a guitar is nearly always stupid (IMHO). That's especially true when there's almost always a finish that you can live with already available. And refinishing a guitar so that it's *really* cool can be expensive. Check out GMW guitars (website and Facebook pages) for examples of guitars that have been seriously refinished. But check the prices for that work on the way.

4. Adding new frets to a guitar that doesn't *need* them is usually a fool's errand. You'll usually get back a slightly chewed up fretboard. It's almost always cheaper to hunt down a guitar that has the frets you need than to re-fret an existing guitar. Check into the cost of a refret at a really good tech to get an idea what you're into.

5. Having a guitar set up by a really good professional is *always* a good idea. Finding a really good professional, however, is often a lot tougher than you'd think. The really good ones may charge the same as the mediocre ones, but you don't know which is which until after you get the guitar back. And if you don't know a lot about guitars, you'll often find yourself living with crap that you just don't KNOW is bad. I use a guy named Gary Brawer in San Francisco. There are good techs where I live (Los Angeles), and yet I haul guitars 400 miles north to have Gary work on them. He's had a PLEK machine since about 2001 (there's a brand spanking new model in the shop now) and he's an expert on it. He's also an expert on modifications (I've had him move controls, add space to control cavities, etc.) including installing Sustainers (Fernandes usually deflects calls on their own products to him). I confess I *have* had Gary do a setup with PLEK and fret supergluing (and action adjustment, etc.) on a cheap guitar with a Floyd (an under-$200 Agile B-stock) and that setup cost more than the guitar did. But that guitar is over 6 years old now and works hard for a living, sounds great and plays great. It's earned back the money spent on it many times over.

Buy the best used guitar you can afford that you like. *Settle* on things that you really don't care about, and don't get into "customizing" your own guitar just because you heard on some guitar forum thread that this or that bit is better.
Last edited by dspellman at Jun 23, 2016,
#12
Is it possible to paint any guitar's fretboard or coat it with gloss like some strat's fretboards ?
It feels so nicer ...