#1
Hey,

Just curious if anyone had much experience with the 2016 Gibson range. Particularly the Gibson les paul studio traditional and the Gibson SG standard traditional. I plan on getting both an sg and a les paul but want to know how the les paul studio traditional comparison quality to the sg . I'm leaning towards the les paul first due to its versatility but if the SG quality is far superior I may pick that up first and continue looking for a les paul model that has the quality I'm looking for. I'm mainly concerned about fret work. I want to be able to play it right out the box with no sharp fret ends and no unlevel frets. Has anyone had experience with these guitars? Or the range is general?

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/LPSTUVSCH
http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/SGSHCCH

Thanks

James
#2
The quality should be the same..... If you're concerned about QC, then it's not a problem of a model, but the line of guitars checked one day...
Gibson have got a lot of flack for their QC, but they've gotten better in the recent years.
To add, I have never personally experienced a brand new out of the box Gibson with bad QC, it's always the bad guitars that get the stories around the internet, not the good ones. Because good QC doesn't make good stories, you know.

And I would certainly hope that if you're linking Sweetwater and if you're really considering buying from them that you have the courage to mail them about this same thing and I am sure that they will not send you a poorly setup guitar. If they did, they wouldn't be where they are today.
Unlevel frets are unlikely to happen, but sharp fretends happen instantly when the fretboard shrinks just a bit (at least when the fretboard doesn't have any binding)

I have some experience with the '16 range and I think it's really great. The small store I visited had a SG Special and a Traditional spec Flying V on display. No problems whatsoever, played like butter, both of them.
Gear pics

Quote by Cathbard
Bugera cloning Blackstar is a scandal cloaked in a tragedy making love to a nightmare.

Last edited by Sakke at Jun 23, 2016,
#3
They should be the same quality-wise.

Concerning QC, Gibson are inconsistent with their guitars so you should really try out the very guitar you're going to buy to ensure you're getting a good one.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#4
My trad studio is flawless. Even the action was set up well
We're just a battery for hire with the guitar fire
Ready and aimed at you
Pick up your balls and load up your cannon
For a twenty one gun salute
For those about to rock, FIRE!
We salute you
#5
Quote by unclesalty88
Hey,

Just curious if anyone had much experience with the 2016 Gibson range. Particularly the Gibson les paul studio traditional and the Gibson SG standard traditional. I plan on getting both an sg and a les paul but want to know how the les paul studio traditional comparison quality to the sg . I'm leaning towards the les paul first due to its versatility but if the SG quality is far superior I may pick that up first and continue looking for a les paul model that has the quality I'm looking for. I'm mainly concerned about fret work. I want to be able to play it right out the box with no sharp fret ends and no unlevel frets. Has anyone had experience with these guitars? Or the range is general?



Two questions here: SG vs LP is one. There's not much reason to have an SG and an LP sound-wise. An LP is a bit heavy for some folks, but the SG is often neck-heavy and puts your hands in a very different position. If you just like the looks, fine, but I've never been a big SG fan. LPs, however, litter my den, and I think they breed.

Gibson's quality control has been erratic. You really want to carefully inspect any guitar that you're considering (or that you've purchased if it was online). A lot of folks, even those online here, wouldn't know if they had level frets or not, and when they say, "The action was set up well," you need to realize that there are all kinds of players and that action height is very much a preference. The higher the action, of course, the less people will notice non-level frets. And those folks will tell you "the action was set up well." For them. I mostly play electric with very low action, and I *really* need to have level frets. Most Gibsons have nuts that are cut for medium-high action. If you simply drop the bridge, you'll find fret buzz beginning around the 12th-15th frets regardless of fret level. When you have the nut slots redone (lowered) and then lower the bridge, you'll begin to find the out-of-level frets pretty quickly. These days I take virtually any guitar that's new to me to a tech who runs a PLEK analysis on them. We'll then check the condition of the neck and the existing level on the frets on the PLEK machine's monitor, and then decide whether we need to run the guitar on the machine. This same tech will superglue the frets (he wicks very thin superglue into the tang cavity, giving the fret a solid anchor and removing any chance that it will pop up during a humidity change). I've found that the superglue also eliminates any "dead" frets, where the fret slot is a bit large and the fret tang is just vibrating into dead air. This all happens whether the guitar is a $4000 Gibson or a $400 copy. A PLEK job will level the frets with the best precision while removing the absolute minimum of fret material. A good thing.

Generally the cheaper the Gibson, the more likely you are to have fret issues (ends sticking out, etc.). But the source of the largest number of consumer complaints is the finish (nitrocellulose lacquer). For my money, it's a crap finish and not a premium one. Unfortunately, Gibson has painted itself into a corner (pun intended) with all the advertising it does about a "traditional" finish, and it's going to be very difficult for them to wean themselves off it and into a more modern, self-leveling and more even finish that cures completely in under 24 hours. YMMV.
#6
Sweetwater claims the studios in 2016 were PLEK'd but on Gibson's site there is no mention either way. Any official word on this?
We're just a battery for hire with the guitar fire
Ready and aimed at you
Pick up your balls and load up your cannon
For a twenty one gun salute
For those about to rock, FIRE!
We salute you
#7
Quote by 21GunSalute
Sweetwater claims the studios in 2016 were PLEK'd but on Gibson's site there is no mention either way. Any official word on this?


Two things;
1. Gibson has used the PLEK machines to cut the nut slots on a lot of their guitars, so there's mention of the PLEK machines here and there in the bullet points, but that's obviously not a PLEK job.
2. Gibson does not do a PLEK job as we know it. Period.
What they do is bolt a non-completed guitar to a fixture that bends the neck to *simulate* string tension, then has the PLEK do a basic fret mill.

At Gary Brawer's place, a PLEK job starts with questions about how you play and how you like your action (he may even have you sit down and play a bit for him). The guitar is analyzed under string tension, and sometimes there are MORE questions based on what you see in the monitor. The strings are then loosened/pulled back, and the PLEK dresses the frets, the guitar is brought back up under string tension (using the strings YOU use) and then re-analyzed. I have an Axcess Custom that was supposedly PLEK'd at the factory. When it arrived it had a noticeable Gibson Hump, with high frets from 16 on up that were obvious (but not terrible) on the PLEK monitor at Gary's shop. After the PLEK was completed, the action was bang on.

Don't depend on getting great action because your guitar has a PLEK sticker on it from the Gibson factory.
#8
During my recent tour of the Memphis TN. Gibson factory where they make all of the hollow and semi hollow guitars someone asked about B-Stock. The guide told us that Gibson discontinued selling B-Stock in 1985. He said if you can find a Gibby with a #2 stamped by the serial number it is a pre 85 B-stock and you should buy it.

He said guitars that fail final inspection have everything that can be salvaged removed electronics, tuners etc. and then meet their fate on a 1/4" bandsaw, then he said and I quote "not many guitars do not pass final inspection".

That tells me guitars that, in the past, may have been sold as B-stock are now just sold as A-stock which could explain the quality issues that some people experience, not so much that the QC dept. isn't catching the flaws they are just willing to overlook more than they used to in order to stave off the evil bandsaw.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

Last edited by Evilnine at Jun 24, 2016,
#9
dspellman  This really didn't answer the question as to why there is no mention of the guitar being plek'd or not and especially since it is mentioned on the dealer website such as SweetWater!
#10
Quote by Electrahawg
dspellman  This really didn't answer the question as to why there is no mention of the guitar being plek'd or not and especially since it is mentioned on the dealer website such as SweetWater!


About a year too late for that response considering when this thread was posted.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#11
Quote by Electrahawg
dspellman  This really didn't answer the question as to why there is no mention of the guitar being plek'd or not and especially since it is mentioned on the dealer website such as SweetWater!

Whatever the case may be, old thread is old. Maybe you should go ask Sweetwater?

Please don't necro old threads.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend