#1
I've figured out how to set up drums to get common time, half time, and double time. How can I set up a beat that feels faster than half but slower than common? Is this possible to do without feeling awkward? Same can be asked for a speed between common and double time.
Last edited by glooper23 at Jun 23, 2016,
#2
you...you know you can change tempos, right?
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#3
square root of half and double time
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#4
Triplets?
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
Quote by Hail
you...you know you can change tempos, right?


Hey, yes that's what caused the problem. I wrote and produced a song with several tempo changes, and it was rejected. I was told I should maintain one tempo throughout the song. I was also told that the tempo changes I'm making are mostly due to me not being good enough to handle rhythm, and I'm just using tempo changes to compensate.
#6
glooper23
Quote by glooper23
Hey, yes that's what caused the problem. I wrote and produced a song with several tempo changes, and it was rejected. I was told I should maintain one tempo throughout the song. I was also told that the tempo changes I'm making are mostly due to me not being good enough to handle rhythm, and I'm just using tempo changes to compensate.
Interesting. Tempo changes within a tune are very unusual (not wrong, necessarily, just unusual). What made you think it was a good idea? What was the purpose of the tune (for which it was "rejected")? Can we hear it?
Last edited by jongtr at Jun 24, 2016,
#7
Quote by jongtr
glooper23Interesting. Tempo changes within a tune are very unusual (not wrong, necessarily, just unusual). What made you think it was a good idea? What was the purpose of the tune (for which it was "rejected")? Can we hear it?


The purpose was to convey sudden shifts in emotion, but it required me changing tempo in a way that was jarring. Cajundaddy's suggestion for triplets solved the problem. Song is much better now, thanks.
#9
Quote by cdgraves
The feel isn't dictated entirely by the time signature. You have to experiment with the actual rhythm to get a good feel.


He's not talking about time signatures here though.
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#11
Quote by cdgraves
I assumed by "half time" he meant cut time (2/2).


Half time means that you're playing so it feels like you're playing at half the tempo. It's how in a big rock song the chorus might be played so it feels like it's at half the speed. Nothing to do with time signature changes at all, but if you wanted to you could actually relate it more like playing 8/8 at half the tempo whereas double time would be relatable to 2/2 (like what you hear in fast two steppy music like polka or bluegrass) but that would be silly since most musicians probably know what half time and double time means.
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#12
Quote by cdgraves
I assumed by "half time" he meant cut time (2/2).


you don't see half time much outside of marching band situations, like kristen said it's like 8/8. double time = cut time though.

but yes that is an issue of time signature. i think this was just a big issue of semantics and TS has worked out the issue so it's kinda null
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#13
cdgraves

I don't like this song, but it was the first example to come to mind. Pay attention at about 1:06 into the song. It stays the same tempo, but because of the rhythm it sounds twice as fast. That's double time.



Now this would be an example of half time. The song starts out at half time for a few seconds before getting "up to speed" for the first minute or two. Near the middle of the song it slows back down to half time before going back to normal at the end.



This song on the other hand starts with a double time feel on the intro before going to the normal feel at about 14 seconds in and then switches back to double time when the fast two step. The two step part is a type of Finnish polka called humppa, which is similar to the word oompah. Like most polka music, it is often written as 2/2 or 2/4, but in this case you would call the fast sections double time.

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Last edited by theogonia777 at Jun 24, 2016,
#14
Oh I know what those are in common parlance, I just don't usually hear them in the same breath as "common time" because half and double time don't imply a specific time signature, while common time is another name for 4/4.
#15
Nobody had any trouble understanding what was being discussed.

And for your information, half time implies 8/8 and double time implies 2/2.
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