#1
compared to the teen shredders of the world?im serious...what is the level that they are at compsred to these type of players who you see playing strictly yngwie type solos who have a strong set of rock\metal chops at their disposal?
Last edited by kaxe781 at Jun 25, 2016,
#2
Most great session players can do everything teen shredders can do and more. The answer to any of your follow up questions after this post is "just practice."
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#3
There is zero demand for "Yngwie type shredder" session players in pro studios. Producers are looking for everything else.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jun 25, 2016,
#4
From what I've seen it's more about their overall knowledge than technical proficiency.
Ur kinda useless in the studio if all you can do is make up a wacky solo that's kinda hard to play.
I'd guess there are some miles better in any way to whoever the rock guitar god celebrity is at any given time.
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Jun 25, 2016,
#5
Reminds me of that scene in The Wonders where their bass player quits and has to be replaced by presumably a session player, he's way better than anybody in the band. But also way less physically attractive.
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Jun 25, 2016,
#7
this good:

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#8
It's a different set of skills. Instead of shred, they're expected to:
-Be proficient in many styles of music
-Interpret the producer/songwriter's vague demands
-Understand how their part fits into the big picture and play accordingly
-Songwriters will come in with only a melody and chords. The session player will have to embellish that into a compete sounding song, on their first take.
#9
Quote by sashki
It's a different set of skills. Instead of shred, they're expected to:
-Be proficient in many styles of music
-Interpret the producer/songwriter's vague demands
-Understand how their part fits into the big picture and play accordingly
-Songwriters will come in with only a melody and chords. The session player will have to embellish that into a compete sounding song, on their first take.


this sums things up pretty well.

they also have to be able to read music charts and be able to play straight off them. to say that no shred skill is needed might be a bit off but it isn't a huge priority. you really have to have a great command of your guitar to be a session player that has any success. being a good team player is another skill that is essential. it's not about you at all but rather the song.
#11
Quote by monwobobbo
this sums things up pretty well.

they also have to be able to read music charts and be able to play straight off them. to say that no shred skill is needed might be a bit off but it isn't a huge priority. you really have to have a great command of your guitar to be a session player that has any success. being a good team player is another skill that is essential. it's not about you at all but rather the song.
This. If you've been brought in to do a job, do the job. Don't sit and bug whoever is in charge that "there could be a solo in here" or "well, it's OK, but it needs more
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#12
Quote by chrismendiola
Good, versatile session players tend to be pretty good and versatile.


Sometimes they are also pretty versatile and good as well, but that might better describe a versatile, good session player.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#13
The downside of being a session player though is you are expected to take showers and come to work on time seemingly sober
That is so not rock n roll
Last edited by EyeNon15 at Jun 25, 2016,
#14
Look up Isaiah Sharkey, he plays guitar for D'Angelo. He's as good as Tosin Abasi. One of Selena Gomez's guitarists is the lead guitarist for Jazz Kamikazi. Look them up. In other words, studio musicians are hand selected by the producers from schools of music for being the best musicians available. Chris Dave drums for Justin Beiber, Adele, D'Angelo, all of them hire expensive musicians for their records/singles.