#1
Greeting everybody,
I've recently purchased a Taylor 214ce, and I already love it to bits.
But the issue with it is that action seems a bit high, now I checked the papers that come with it and found out that it may be a result of the guitar being a bit over humidified, which causes the top to swell up and the bridge to rise with it, and as a result, makes the action higher.
And I know the action is higher than it's supposed to be because I read in the papers that the neck should point towards the bridge. so I laid a straight edge from the first fret of the guitar right to the bridge, and the neck was pointing below it (the neck kept getting farther down from the edge the closer you got to the bridge)
and setting that edge horizontally below the bridge, I saw that the top is slightly arching.
Now the question is, is the guitar's top supposed to be that way? or should I dehumidify it more so that it sinks to be flat or nearly flat?
If not then I suppose I should adjust the neck.
#2
do you know what the humidity is in the room you keep the guitar in? action can be high for reasons other than high humidity, so before doing anything, you need to have a hygrometer, callibrate it and use it.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#3
Quote by shbly12
Greeting everybody,
I've recently purchased a Taylor 214ce, and I already love it to bits.
But the issue with it is that action seems a bit high, now I checked the papers that come with it and found out that it may be a result of the guitar being a bit over humidified, which causes the top to swell up and the bridge to rise with it, and as a result, makes the action higher.
And I know the action is higher than it's supposed to be because I read in the papers that the neck should point towards the bridge. so I laid a straight edge from the first fret of the guitar right to the bridge, and the neck was pointing below it (the neck kept getting farther down from the edge the closer you got to the bridge).
Exactly how puffy is the sound board, looking across the lower bout in line with the bridge? You realize that a guitar is supposed to be slightly convex across the lower bout? Flat or concave is trouble.

I have a Taylor 115e (12 string), and I don't think Taylor sets the action as low as it might be, at the factory. They want to avoid warranty work with "fret buzz" complaints from players with a heavy touch.

So, the moral of >MY< story is, I plan to set the action of the 12, since it has risen slightly over the year or so I've owned the guitar. This is understandable with a 12 string, as the string tension is quite high. So any "breaking in", or "settling", or whatever you might call it, is exacerbated by that string tension.

Taylor, (as well as most other makers), season and store their lumber at very tightly controlled humidity levels. Those of us who live in the real world, may have to deal with slight seasonal changes in action height.

While it's nice to know what brand of guitar you own, it's pretty much useless information. Now where you live, how you heat your home, and what temps you set your air conditioner(s) would be much more helpful. There's a big difference in average humidity from Arizona, to the Pacific Northwest.

Do like Patti says, buy a hygrometer, calibrate it, get back to us
#4
Sorry for bumping a slightly old thread but:
My hygrometer has arrived yesterday, and it shows that humidity bounces between 65% and 40% throughout day and night, turning air-con on and off doesn't cause it to drop below 40%, so I'm guessing that conditions are good for my guitar.
About its lower bout, it's a bit concave but I've learned that it's supposed to be this way, and a straight edge laid horizontally across it just beneath the bridge swings over it like a see-saw (no gaps in it.
Now just remains the question of if I should set the neck, and I'm convinced that I want to because it's very difficult to play.
#5
Quote by shbly12
Sorry for bumping a slightly old thread but:
My hygrometer has arrived yesterday, and it shows that humidity bounces between 65% and 40% throughout day and night, turning air-con on and off doesn't cause it to drop below 40%, so I'm guessing that conditions are good for my guitar.
About its lower bout, it's a bit concave but I've learned that it's supposed to be this way, and a straight edge laid horizontally across it just beneath the bridge swings over it like a see-saw (no gaps in it.
Now just remains the question of if I should set the neck, and I'm convinced that I want to because it's very difficult to play.

Well NO, the lower bout is supposed to be a bit convex, are you sure you don't have the terms "concave" and "convex:, confused? If its "concave", that would mean the lower bout is sagging inward, towards the back of the guitar. Please read this as many times as you need to, to fully understand it: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html

Other than the "relief" which it appears you've already checked, there is nothing else to set about the neck, period. If the guitar is hard to play, the "action" is likely too high, and that gets adjusted by lowering the "saddle", which is the "white thingy" in the middle of the "bridge".

Other than the action being too high, additional possibilities are, you're using too heavy of a string set, or, you're just not strong enough, (YET), to manage a steel string acoustic.

I obviously can't speak to everyone's climactic situation, but here in the "City of Brotherly Contention", the daytime humidity is pushing 55% with temps in the mid 90's. After nightfall, the temperature drop causes the humidity to approach saturation or, 100%!

Accordingly, I can't afford to set the air conditioner thermostat anywhere near cold enough to damage a guitar. Since, we're trying to go from a potential 80% average, to maybe 50% at a temperature equivalent to that of the night time OAT.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 17, 2016,
#6
Captaincranky yeah I meant convex.
And I guess you're right that my hands and fingers are still not string enough for a steel string guitar.
But I'm still gonna try adjusting the relief since it's the easiest step to take and the easiest to reverse.
#7
Setting relief will do nothing to improve the action, that's not what it's for. It's to prevent buzzing between the fretted string and the nut. You must lower the saddle or change the neck angle (prefered with a Taylor) to align the neck with the saddle.
#8
adding relief will make the strings closer to the fingerboard at the top and bottom but further away in the middle.

did you calibrate the hygrometer or at least test it?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#9
Quote by skido13
Setting relief will do nothing to improve the action, that's not what it's for. It's to prevent buzzing between the fretted string and the nut. You must lower the saddle or change the neck angle (prefered with a Taylor) to align the neck with the saddle.


^ ^ ^ ^ ^ perfect answer.

But note: if the top has risen (which seems likely from the OP's description) you might not be able to lower the saddle by very much because the break angle of the strings over the saddle might be too low.