#1
Hey guys. So, lately I've been experiencing that tinny, sort of sitar-like sound on the 14th fret of the b string (other strings are fine) on my Strat. Read up on some possible fixes and figured the least "invasive" one (not gonna go anywhere near the truss rod!) would be to raise the height at the bridge. That seemed to fix it... sort of. Now, even though there isn't that tinniness, the b string is noticeably higher than the other treble strings- about twice as high, actually.

Now obviously I'm no guitar tech, but I have a strong feeling this is the important part (which I didn't find any older threads addressing): as I would raise the string gradually, the tinniness would move up to higher frets. Any thoughts on what the problem might be?

Thanks in advance!
#2
Quote by Jake P
Read up on some possible fixes and figured the least "invasive" one (not gonna go anywhere near the truss rod!) would be to raise the height at the bridge. That seemed to fix it... sort of. Now, even though there isn't that tinniness, the b string is noticeably higher than the other treble strings- about twice as high, actually.
The trouble with this sort of reasoning is it probably is either a truss rod issue or a high fret. Raising the string bypasses the problem, but it doesn't solve it and it creates a new one. Find yourself a guide on checking neck relief (there are hundreds on the internet that you can Google easily) and see if the truss rod needs adjusting. If it does, just work slowly doing no more than a quarter turn at a time and you won't damage anything. To check for a high fret, just get something with a perfectly straight side like the end of a good ruler or something and put it across three frets close to the B string and see if you can rock it back and forth. If you can, the fret in the middle is high.
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Jun 26, 2016,
#3
Quote by K33nbl4d3
The trouble with this sort of reasoning is it probably is either a truss rod issue or a high fret. Raising the string bypasses the problem, but it doesn't solve it and it creates a new one. Find yourself a guide on checking neck relief (there are hundreds on the internet that you can Google easily) and see if the truss rod needs adjusting. If it does, just work slowly doing no more than a quarter turn at a time and you won't damage anything. To check for a high fret, just get something with a perfectly straight side like the end of a good ruler or something and put it across three frets close to the B string and see if you can rock it back and forth. If you can, the fret in the middle is high.


Thanks for the feedback. I'll definitely check out the stuff on neck relief... might just take it in to a tech, though. I've never done truss rod work before. And yeah, I checked with a ruler- no rocking back and forth, so I'm nearly positive it's not a high fret.
#4
If you take it to a tech, ideally get them to show you how it's done. Paying a tech is an expensive way to turn a couple of screws so the sooner you can get comfortable with doing all your setup stuff yourself the more money you save, basically.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 
Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Jun 26, 2016,