#1
Good Evening guys

I am working on my speed and accuracy when playing faster runs on the guitar, and I seem to be having some difficulty in finding a solution for my right hand technique.

I have uploaded a quick video of a staggered major scale run to YouTube, which you can access via this link:

As you can see in the video, parts of the run are clean and accurate, but others are muted and sloppy. It seems to happen when I need to move my hand to access different strings comfortably. What I've also noticed is that my arm seems to grip like velcro to the top of the guitar body (I have rather fabby arms, which is probably why). My hand is then fighting against this to keep fluidity when shifting strings. However, i don't even know if the rest of my technique is right at this point.

I understand that everyone's technique is slightly different, and it may just require even further practice. But I just wanted to be sure there wasn't some technical hurdle that I was tripping over.

If the angle on the video isn't right, please let me know and I will re-record my attempt
#2
Soeed is a byproduct of accuracy. A good, fast alternate-picking hand isn't moving any faster than a poor, sloppy-sounding one, but it is moving shorter distances and changing the direction of its movement more times per second. Your hands goal should be to reduce and refine each part of the picking motion until every millimetre of its actual movement plays an active part in the production of notes. Anything surplus to this is a waste of time and energy.

You might well find the end result lacking in volume or conviction. Perhaps it's harder to get a big sounding note than it was when you played the less efficient way. You should think of this as a temporary setback; the more times your hands go through the motions of playing an 'efficient' note, the more confident they become, and soon you'll find that you can channel the same amount of energy into a smaller arc of movement.

Same principles apply when playing legato.
#4
dragozan I agree with mdc, but here are my two cents:

If I'm not mistaken, it sounds like you're practicing with distortion and a subtle delay. There are probably different schools of thought on this, but I think for practicing straight technique on a scale you should play it clean and without delay. That way you can really hear the sound of your right hand stroke, as well as more cleanly hear any inaccuracies you have. Because sometimes you will hit the note in the correct time, but not comfortably enough to get the correct tone. Then later, when it's time to perform, you throw that stuff back on it will sound even better!

And then just a quite subjective suggestion: personally I prefer to have the guitar more parallel to the ground (also a little bit higher). This makes it so that when I change strings I can move in a straight line, which is obviously the quickest path to the next string. That's not the only thing holding you (or really, all of us) back, but it may help. Obviously there are many total badasses with very diagonal guitars, so take it with a grain of salt. But maybe that will help a little bit with your sticking arm as well.

Lastly, although it's not related to your original question, try to keep the fingers on your left hand closer to the fretboard at all times. I have been quite surprised how many times a problem that I thought was in my right hand was fixed by improving the efficiency of my left hand.

Anyway, it sounds pretty good already, just keep at it. Hours always help! Good luck!
#5
As an experiment, try wearing a long-sleeve top, and grab hold of the sleeve with your little finger of youir picking hand. That will remove friction ... I had a similar problem (my forearm is quite heavy, and gets hot very quickly) ... doing this trick with the sleeve made a ridiculous anount of difference (and especially on sweep-picking). Not a solution, but confirmewd where the problem lay. For me, I then worked on lightening my contact with guitar body.
#6
Quote by mdc
Soeed is a byproduct of accuracy. A good, fast alternate-picking hand isn't moving any faster than a poor, sloppy-sounding one, but it is moving shorter distances and changing the direction of its movement more times per second. Your hands goal should be to reduce and refine each part of the picking motion until every millimetre of its actual movement plays an active part in the production of notes. Anything surplus to this is a waste of time and energy.

You might well find the end result lacking in volume or conviction. Perhaps it's harder to get a big sounding note than it was when you played the less efficient way. You should think of this as a temporary setback; the more times your hands go through the motions of playing an 'efficient' note, the more confident they become, and soon you'll find that you can channel the same amount of energy into a smaller arc of movement.

Same principles apply when playing legato.


Quote by boff_g

If I'm not mistaken, it sounds like you're practicing with distortion and a subtle delay. There are probably different schools of thought on this, but I think for practicing straight technique on a scale you should play it clean and without delay. That way you can really hear the sound of your right hand stroke, as well as more cleanly hear any inaccuracies you have. Because sometimes you will hit the note in the correct time, but not comfortably enough to get the correct tone. Then later, when it's time to perform, you throw that stuff back on it will sound even better!


Follow these guidelines and with patience it will come! I also had to fix my right hand technique, and my tones in the start was weak, but after my hand got used to the movement all my tones got better.

On a concert I has to use the house PA, and the amp they had only had clean sound. Holy shit I could clearly hear that my right hand technique was lacking a lot because I've always practiced with distortion which .. it's compressed so you kinda get the loud volume either way how weak you pick a note. On stage, this really shaked my confidence, because everything I did was all so transparent. Clean sound is kinda the "hard mode", you should like what you hear your hands produce when you play with clean sound!
Last edited by Yois111 at Jun 29, 2016,