#1
Hi,
Has anyone ever tapped into their guitar amplifiers' power supply circuitry to get 9V for their pedals?
Even if the 9V wasn't already present on the amps circuit board, it would seem a fella could build a
small regulator circuit to get 9V of it somehow (i.e. from 12v/24v?).

I'm wanting to place a plug for 9Vdc off of my amp so i can then daisy-chain-cable to the pedals.
i.e. use Amplifier power in place of a pedal-board supply box.
#2
Not sure what the benefit would be but there are some obvious drawbacks. 9V supplies aren't exactly expensive and pulling power from the amp is going to be either noisy or a PITA or both, again with no real benefit that I can think of.

If you wanted to build a small regulator circuit it seems to me it would be smarter to spend the extra few dollars to power it efficiently and cleanly instead of fighting against a power supply designed for something entirely different. A One Spot is like $20 and you can daisy chain to your heart's content from that.
#3
Remember that you dealing with A/C power in the amp and D/C power on the pedals. The cost of a conversion would not be worth it at all not mention running a power line from an amp to the pedals. Get a One Spot.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jun 30, 2016,
#4
Quote by Roc8995
Not sure what the benefit would be ..


Thanks for the replies: here's a little more background.
I use a clean (acoustic) amp. that i feed a pedalboard(digitech) into, it draws about 1.5Amp (appx.)
The other two pedals (for vocals/looper) also draw over 1A. I'll checkout the 'One Spot', but most of those pedal supplies i've seen only allow
up to 500mA draw (?).
I want my 'rig' to be as portable as possible so i don't want to be lugging any 'wall-warts' (transformers) around. Also two of
the pedals (vocal and looper) i keep velcro'd to the top of the Amp. (i control the looper with a remote FSWX)
#5
The amp's power supply just isn't a practical solution in this scenario. It was designed to feed the amp, and nothing else. There's a decent chance that tapping it for as much juice as you're asking for would destroy the amp. It's also not likely to be pumping out anything close to what your pedals want, and then you're back to square one because now you need a big bulky conversion circuit. After all that, it'd probably be noisy as hell.

There's a reason the dedicated power supplies for those pedals are as large as they are. Anything you'd cobble together to tap from the amp would likely be just as large, and get just as hot, except it would be inside the amp, which is a recipe for disaster.

If the amp has an open back, you can always throw a power strip and all your wall warts in there.
#6
Quote by teggenberger
Hi,
Has anyone ever tapped into their guitar amplifiers' power supply circuitry to get 9V for their pedals?
Even if the 9V wasn't already present on the amps circuit board, it would seem a fella could build a
small regulator circuit to get 9V of it somehow (i.e. from 12v/24v?).
.


Why bother? That's way more effort than it's worth (assuming it was doable). Bolt the power supplies for your pedals to the inside wall of your amp, bolt a power strip....wait...isn't that what Roc8995 just said? That.

One of the best setups, however, that I've seen for this is the Atomic Reactor 112/212. The "pedal" in this case is a desktop modeler, such as a Pod HD (bean), M-Audio, Vox, Behringer. They've got the modeler mounted in a hot-swappable bay that has all the connections for the modeler (including guitar in/out, etc.) running into a single connector. The internal tube amp (part of the Atomic Reactor) is either an 18W EL84 or a 50W 6L6 chunk and it feeds into a closed-back cabinet. You walk the thing into a venue, plug it into the wall, plug the guitar cable into its spot and turn it on. But I don't think they're pulling from the amp's power supply; they're just providing a separate one.



#7
Quote by teggenberger
Hi,
Has anyone ever tapped into their guitar amplifiers' power supply circuitry to get 9V for their pedals?
Even if the 9V wasn't already present on the amps circuit board, it would seem a fella could build a
small regulator circuit to get 9V of it somehow (i.e. from 12v/24v?).

I'm wanting to place a plug for 9Vdc off of my amp so i can then daisy-chain-cable to the pedals.
i.e. use Amplifier power in place of a pedal-board supply box.


^^ Please don't do this. A One Spot is $20... buy one and you can thank me later.
https://www.amazon.com/Truetone-NW1-1-Spot-Adapter/dp/B0002GZLZQ
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jun 30, 2016,
#8
Back in the day when I was much less experienced I tried something similar to this. It won't work. One, you may or may not even have 9v available in the amp's power supply; it's usually 12v or 15v or a bit more (a lot more in higher-power amps). Two, the dropping resistors in the amp's power supply are only intended to give the aforementioned voltage at a specific current (that is, the current pulled by the section of the amp that voltage is meant for) and three, any extra current through the resistors (like from powering an external pedal) is going to pull that supply voltage way down, which will also affect the power supply nodes for the rest of the amp. This will be quite hard on the amp and in more extreme cases will destroy it.

So, yeah, don't do this.
#9
No amp is going to have an extra 1a just laying around.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer