#1
I've got a Peavey Horizon II. It's an 1984 electric guitar. My late grandfather willed it to me along with his acoustic Ovation. Here's the catch though. The peavey is in horrible condition. There was a lot of water damage. The foam which supported the guitar inside the case, melted... onto the backside of the guitar...

Good news is that besides the horrible aesthetics, it should still work! there is no corrosion on the electrical components, the neck is perfectly straight and there was moisture in or around the pickups. I have yet to test it out because there is a lot of cleaning up to do (plus it has no strings. They disintegrated). For the most part I can fix it myself, except for one problem when I'm here to ask you about.

The backside of the guitar's body was covered in that melted foam. Some of it fused to the paint, and scraping it off would mean scraping off the paint. I've sanded down a lot of it so there's only some specific areas where the foam is still fused to it. So now the back of the guitar feels rough and sticky. I can't afford to get the whole thing repainted, and honestly I don't want to put that much money into it. So I want to hear from you, do you have any suggestions on how I could remedy this on my own?
Last edited by 4xdblack at Jul 1, 2016,
#2
You could try Goo Gone, though I don't know if that would damage the finish beneath the foam. I've never used it on wood, or even had to deal with melted foam on paint before. I have used it to clean sticky messes off of cars though, and never damaged the finishes there.
#3
If the foam was melted to the paint, there is a very high chance that the paint it ruined anyway. There are 2 ways you could address this as I see it. First, sand down the back until you take off some of the clear, but not the actual paint. Then just re-clear that area, sand, and buff.

The other option would be to just strip all the components off the guitar and sand the whole body. It's best, in my experience, to not sand all the way to rough wood. Just sand down to the sealant layer (just enough to where the paint is no longer on the guitar but still leave to clear protective coat that a lot of guitars have under the first layer of paint. Choose a spray paint color you like, paint a few layers (make them thin and build up as you go), then cover with clear multiple times. Wet sand with a high grit, and if you don't have a polisher, you can just use car rubbing compound and hand buff the clear with a rag.

It's not expensive at all, just time consuming. You would be out maybe $20-$30 in supplies I would guess.

For reference, this is a repaint I did on my squire a while back. I think I spent a total of like $21 on spray paint. I didn't even bother buffing the clear.
Last edited by lilcurtis at Jul 1, 2016,
#4
Every guitar can be restored (just as almost every car can be restored), but it really boils down to how much the car/guitar is worth to you completed, and how much the restoration process will cost (in time and parts and money).

Many kinds of foam used in cases will rot (and smell a bit like pee) over time. I have maybe 50-60 Anvil-type cases that have had their foam replaced at least once. Mostly the foam isn't difficult to get off, but if the finish on the guitar has also "rotted," you have a different thing going on.

If you sand it down, you can clear the guitar with a good rattle-can paint and then either paint it yourself or put a transit vinyl wrap (exactly like the ones that cover city buses and lamborghinis) on it.
#5
lilcurtis The problem I have at a full repaint is that I don't have the skills or tools required to completely disassemble the guitar. Would it be a bad idea to try and cover the back with something like nail polish? Or would I be able to do a repaint of the back without disassembling the guitar if I'm careful?
#6
Quote by 4xdblack
lilcurtis The problem I have at a full repaint is that I don't have the skills or tools required to completely disassemble the guitar. Would it be a bad idea to try and cover the back with something like nail polish? Or would I be able to do a repaint of the back without disassembling the guitar if I'm careful?

There are a ton of refinishing videos/tutorials, specially if you're doing an opaque finish.

You'll need to disassemble if you want it to look decent/not sloppy since there'll be lots of sanding and spraying involved. TBH, as long as you have opposable thumbs and 4th grade reading skills and dexterity, you'll be fine.
#7
Quote by Ippon
There are a ton of refinishing videos/tutorials, specially if you're doing an opaque finish.

You'll need to disassemble if you want it to look decent/not sloppy since there'll be lots of sanding and spraying involved. TBH, as long as you have opposable thumbs and 4th grade reading skills and dexterity, you'll be fine.


^^ This. If you have ever had to removed a screw in your life, you can disassemble a guitar. There is nothing complicated about it. You could certainly re-clear the back without removing everything if you tape everything off, but honestly, it should take you all of about 10-20 minutes to completely break down the guitar.