#1
I'm working through Mickey Baker's jazz guitar book (Vol. 1) and one of the chords is D13b5b9. I'm having no trouble playing this chord, but I don't really understand it The problem is since there is no D in the chord. Since the root note is not in the chord, I don't know how to move this chord around the fretboard.
I've played piano for 5 years and guitar for 1, so I know a decent amount of music theory, but this is kinda out of my depth. The fingering of the chord from low E to high e is :46x577 . The notes are Ab, Eb, C, F#, B .
Last edited by sebasn10 at Jul 3, 2016,
#2
This would be better in the Musician Talk forum. You'll get some answers there...
#3
As that chord stands, it's actually Ab7#9, if played by itself.

The idea being used is called "tritone substitution" ... but that particular voicing is questionable (the D wouldn't really sound as the root ... the Ab would)

"Tritone" is the term for an interval of 6 semitones (e.g. Ab to D), aka b5. The idea of tritone substiution is finding a pair of 7 chords that share common pitches that are a b5 apart. This usually involves the maj3 and the b7 of either of the chords in the pair. The distance between the roots of this pair is also tritone.

So, for example, look at this progression in the key of G major: Am7, D7, G,

x x x
5 3 3
5 5 4
5 4 5
x 5 x
5 x 3

Above. the tritone is found on the 4th and 3rd strings of the D7 (F# and C, the maj3 and b7 of the chord)

We can keep this exact same tritone in Ab ...

x
4
5
4
x
4

Now, here the F# (strictly speakig Gb) is the b7 of the Ab7 chord, and the C is the maj3 of the Ab7. (Remember, in a dominant chord, the maj3 and the b7 provide the main intervals) ... so the role of these pitches in the D7 has switched in the Ab7.

Hence

x x x
5 4 3
5 5 4
5 4 5
x x x
5 4 3

This is very common is jazz.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jul 4, 2016,