#1
I hear this topic sometimes on this forum and i want to clear some things up. for those who dont know what absolute pitch is, the broadest definition i can make is hearing notes like perceiving colors and being able to tie those colors (notes) to their respective names and easily identify them, but with the added bonus of being able to reproduce them without a kickstart or help.

the downsides which ive experienced which im sure are not normal are if im not exposed to music for a long period of time, like 2 days, my brain kicks my perception of pitch to make everything sound like it either too flat or too sharp, which take a while to go away. any music or individual instruments not close or perfectly in pitch are unbearable to listen to and forces me to shut out the sound. Id have to halt a jam session sometimes to tell the guitarist to tune his guitar because it sounds like nails on a chalkboard. Any song intentionally pitched up or down, whether exact or not exact to western pitches sounds like a completely new song to me, which can completely throw me off if im trying to cover it on guitar. the best way i can describe it is being lost in a forest and unable to find a clearing in the trees to escape it. It is like everything i ever knew doesnt matter after the pitch being intentionally changed. This is included with my education on music theory and the relative pitch i have developed because of learning music theory. Relative pitch being the act of perceiving the "flavor" the chords give off without actually having to know the pitch of them. Anyone can develop regular pitch but they cant develop absolute pitch unless they are born with it.

it at least however is a good party trick. A guitar player handing his guitar to me and me being able to tune it up to pitch almost perfectly does surprise him, or being in the display section of a guitar center, picking up a guitar and tuning it perfectly in front of everybody there has gotten me some funny looks.
#4
Then you'd probably want to stay away from Badfinger's, "Baby Blue".

Quick question, does the "A" have to be exactly 440 Hz, or is another frequency,"close enough"?
#6
Quote by Captaincranky
Then you'd probably want to stay away from Badfinger's, "Baby Blue".

Quick question, does the "A" have to be exactly 440 Hz, or is another frequency,"close enough"?


In some cases it doesn't have to be. AP doesn't have to be locked to 440 concert pitch, it is the brains way of perceiving pitches as a whole. If someone with AP was born and for most of their life were exposed to A=432 concert pitch, they'd be used to any pitch tuned around that frequency. People with AP can however adapt and aquire a different perception of pitch than the pitch they perceived before, albeit really slowly.

In my case though, since I was exposed to more to the modern standard of music in A=440, I am used to any note tuned around that concert pitch and anything outside that to me will sound bad. I've taken many tests for this and can hear notes that are less than 1 hertz apart in difference. It gets really annoying to not enjoy music like everyone else because of slight differences in pitch.
Last edited by sourcegamer101 at Jul 4, 2016,
#7
Have you tried listening to Mattias IA Eklundh. He uses true temperament frets.

Not that you need lessons, but thought this might be pleading for your ear.

Last edited by mdc at Jul 5, 2016,
#8
Perfect pitch is probably one of the most awful "skills" that one could possess. The inability to listen to just intonated music or non 12-tone music is quite lamentable. For example, Arabic oud music is some of the most beautiful music in the world. Not being able to listen to it because it is played in just intonated 24 tone is just awful.
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#9
Quote by sourcegamer101
...[ ]...In my case though, since I was exposed to more to the modern standard of music in A=440, I am used to any note tuned around that concert pitch and anything outside that to me will sound bad. I've taken many tests for this and can hear notes that are less than 1 hertz apart in difference. It gets really annoying to not enjoy music like everyone else because of slight differences in pitch.
Does the 1 Hz tolerance increase as you go up through the octaves? At E2 (about 81Hz), 1 Hz is about 1.2%, Obviously, that percentage drops dramatically were you to make the same comparison @ E6..

This thread reminded me of a Guinness World Record Attempt for "highest note ever sung by a male singer". They had a gentleman with perfect pitch as the "measuring tool", for the attempt.

Here's the video about it:
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 4, 2016,
#10
Captaincranky

the 1hz difference does exponentially increase the higher the octave and is very noticeable. As for the world record, he did hit C#, albeit it was slightly flat.
Last edited by sourcegamer101 at Jul 4, 2016,
#11
Quote by sourcegamer101
the 1hz difference does exponentially increase the higher the octave and is very noticeable.


The 1Hz difference decreases exponentially the higher the octave, ie a 1Hz increase of the 65.406 Hz low C2 string on a cello is a difference about a 1.5% inrease and around 25 cents and just about anyone would notice that. In contrast a 1 Hz increase of the 2093.0 C7 note that is the highest I can play on my 20 fret mandolin is a change of less than .05% and maybe 2/3 of a cent and completely negligible.
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#12
theogonia777 thanks for clarifying. i thought he meant (for example) say E1 41.20 was upped by 1.5hz so it is now 42.7. That x2 is now 85.4. That will definitely be more noticable.

You are saying if C2 +1hz sounds as noticeable as C7 +1hz. In that case the difference is so miniscule in that high of range it basically becomes unnoticeable. My limit is A0 to around C8
Last edited by sourcegamer101 at Jul 4, 2016,