#1
Hi there guys, i have two questions... First, what do you think is generally better ? or more effective? To practice exercises or solos? I mean, should I pick up some ''alternate picking exercise'' or for example a part of rusty cooley's solo and practice that? Is there a big difference? Second one, Im having a problem with synchronization, i feel i can play faster, like my hands are ready to play faster and im getting bored at this tempo, where i have a little problems with synchronization, but i still play at these slow tempos to fix that, but nothing is getting better. Do you have any advice? For example, im not fully synchronizated at 120 bpm, should i still try practice at 130 and 140 if my hands can handle that but its not absolutely synchonizated? Its not like totally unsynchronizated, but its also not absolutely synchronizated, the biggest problem is position 134 i think, having a problem with ring finger and pinky. Thanks for replay guys!
#2
exercises or solos, i don't think it matters as long as you're playing a variety of things. exercises are an easy way to get variety, but if you learn lots of solos you'll get that variety too, and it won't be nearly as boring. what's more important is practicing correctly and being completely honest with yourself as to your abilities. for example, try playing unplugged. you should be able to hear the notes evenly, even without an amp. it'll be much easier to know when you don't have something down.

i don't practice with a metronome. i think it's better to treat metronome-following as a separate skill. when you're struggling with something like hand synchronization, you don't need the added pressure of following the click - just focus on the problem areas (like your ring finger and pinky) and figure out how it feels when you are actually playing the notes clearly.
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#3
both i would say. if there's something specifich which you're struggling with, doing exercises is probably the most efficient way to fix that- rather than playing a 30 second solo where maybe only 2 seconds of the solo has that technique in it.

however once you have addressed the weakness i'd say playing solos is better- they're more like real music, and also just because you can do something when it's an exercise doesn't mean you can do it in the middle of a solo or a piece of music. exercises can make you seem better than you are, if you're not careful.
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#4
My thoughts are aligned with Dave's here. I'd say practice exercises when you have a specific problem you want to solve with your technique/musical knowledge that is targeted only on that thing. Otherwise i'd say solos. They will teach you how to play in different styles, teach you musical vocabulary, teach you the nuances of playing guitar (articulation, tone, phrasing, feel, dynamics etc), teach you to train your ear (if you are learning the solos by ear, which i strongly advice you do) and they will help you develop your own style.

Exercises are for specific problems that need fixing. Can't pick "x" type of passages cleanly? Make an exercise only containing that element, slow down and analyze what is going wrong and fix it. Or musical exercises like "i can't outline the changes on Y tune, ill work on playing chord tones over them until they are internalized properly".
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#5
^ yeah you need to watch, if you only do exercises you can sound like you're playing exercises instead of music...
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#6
I think its much better to practice musical sequences when it comes to alternate picking as opposed to strict chromatic or something. Its much more satisfying listening to a beautiful melody get faster and faster than 1234 2345 3456.....

Some of my favorites are all of Eugene's Trick Bag (alternate pick everything), Michael Angelo Batio No Boundaries (fast picking 4/4 sequence toward the end), and just to come up with my own ideas.

Once you get a good hang of things other people have written, its so much easier to just come up with good stuff on the fly, you get positions and patterns ingrained.
#8
Hello, have you moved on from this a year later? This seemingly eternal problem of technical freedom boils down to what YngeM said "use your ears, if it sounds good it's good". Now what did he mean by that, one thing he did not mean for sure was harmonic construction no not that at all. What he meant was that the actualization and feel and sound of expression(just like when you say something with meaning vocally, the sound feels good as you are expressing it), there is no pause in anticipation of applause or acknowledgement, the words speak(so to speak) for themselves. This means then that if patterns or exercises sound dull or boring it is the fault of the player and their approach not the exercise. The reason to study some pattern is not alone to be able to do it, no that is the "Content" as Marshall McLuhan might have said, the main reason to study a pattern(that is to say a cycle) is to appreciate the contours of the form, to allow it to teach you. What I mean by form is the reality of the patterns execution as it is being executed. If you pay close attention to this the means for it's embodiment becomes apparent and REAL learning takes place and the sense of form becomes apparent not just for that but for everything technique-wise and then you can decide if "learning solo's" is necessary and/or fruitful. 

Now a word on solos...it is well possible to learn solos note for note and be able to play them and at the same time learn absolute nothing meaningful except to in fact retard your progress by giving a false impression of what creative expression actually is. Slowing something down so as to hear the notes more clearly and bring it up to speed is a very, very, very, very, very bad idea, because what you are doing is creating a false image of what the actual form(embodied in actual musical time)is. Something is either natural or it isn't, so do yourself a favor and only express in a natural manner( just like Chick Corea said if you don't feel it don't play it). Try this put your fingers down on the instrument as they fall without ANY affectation and look at them, if the pink naturally curls under the ring finger(as it naturally does) no amount of exercise or solo learning will change that, EVER period. What takes place when the hand is "stretched out" is the implication of that fact not the so called training away of that natural tendency. 

How's that for an answer.

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Last edited by phenomenology at Jun 4, 2017,