#1
I recently posted a thread of "could a baritone be a vocalist for a power metal band", I got postive replies, but, insofar as covering a song by Iron Maiden, Kamelot or Sonata Arctica, I would have to lower the key of the song I'm covering, otherwise I'd be singing in head voice half the time. In doing this though, would the song particularly sound the same given that it would be a cover. My vocal coach said it wouldn't make a difference but I would need the opinions of some metal fans.
#2
I fail to see a problem with doing that outside of perhaps some problems for the guitarist
Praise the Z-Dog, my DADDY
#3
Quote by kingoffretboard
I recently posted a thread of "could a baritone be a vocalist for a power metal band", I got postive replies, but, insofar as covering a song by Iron Maiden, Kamelot or Sonata Arctica, I would have to lower the key of the song I'm covering, otherwise I'd be singing in head voice half the time. In doing this though, would the song particularly sound the same given that it would be a cover. My vocal coach said it wouldn't make a difference but I would need the opinions of some metal fans.
Speaking directly about Kamelot's Ray Kahn, and his replacement who sounds a lot like him, they both have quite extensive ranges, although they don't always use them.

Some of those bands you mentioned use drop tuning, do they not? That would create problems in a situation where the guitars are already tuned pretty much as low as they'll go.

You can lower the key by using a capo up the neck, but god knows how that would fly in a metal band......:yikes:

I don't know if it's necessary to explain that, but FWIW, suppose you have a song in G. You would put a capo on say the 3rd fret, which would give you the key of Bb, and then simply sing at the lower octave. Singing down an octave in G would be too low, but Bb might work fine. You can also simply play in a different key without a capo, but that only works if the song's chords aren't "shape dependent".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 9, 2016,
#4
Well most metal songs are usually written in the key of whatever the lowest note on the guitar is. So you can just tune lower and play normaly, and most of the time it sounds ok. But like Captain said, if the song is already in a low tuning, like some of kamelot songs are (i think Liar is in drop C), then you dont have that much wiggle room left. You can just transpose it lower, but means getting rid of all the open note chugging on the low strings, and thats gonna suck for metal. It should work for iron maiden tho, they pretty much just use standard tuning anyway. Try tuning 2 steps or more and see how you can do.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#5
Thanks guys, Kamelot is actually my favourite band, but as a guitarist myself, I can experiment with some diefferent keys. Iron Maiden should work as gorkyporky has said but Dickinson sings quite fast so I'll have to practice that.
#6
gorkyporky What about songs by Kamelot such as Karma, The Haunting, Forever, My Confession, Veil of Elysium, Elizabeth. Those songs aren't tuned too lowly are they?
#7
Quote by kingoffretboard
gorkyporky What about songs by Kamelot such as Karma, The Haunting, Forever, My Confession, Veil of Elysium, Elizabeth. Those songs aren't tuned too lowly are they?
Karma, Elizabeth, and Forever are in Eb standard.
Veil of Elysium requires only drop D.
The Haunting requires drop C#.
My Confession requires drop C.

Good set of songs
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#8
NeoMvsEu Cool, thank you.

I will try my best with the Kamelot songs, the only actual trouble with them is that I go into head voice in the chorus when both Khan and Karevik sing them in chest voice.
#9
Quote by kingoffretboard
NeoMvsEu Cool, thank you.

I will try my best with the Kamelot songs, the only actual trouble with them is that I go into head voice in the chorus when both Khan and Karevik sing them in chest voice.
Np!

Just be careful. Khan lost his voice from the continual stress he put on it, and Karevik conserves his energy for the purpose of avoiding this very thing. There's no shame in doing what's healthiest for your voice in the long run.
#10
Yeah, ive seen some live footage from kamelot shows, and Karevik usually doesnt sing the really high parts in songs. Im not even sure if he can hit them on a bad day. I've also seen plenty of singers do that, either lower the highest note, or just not sing it (Amorphis comes to mind). Honestly, i dont think thats bad. Singing to your limit every day for moths at a time will surely fuck up anyones voice.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#11
NeoMvsEu I believe Khan lost his voice from belting high notes as he is a lyric baritone (as far as I know), in The Fourth Legacy he belts a c5 when a lyric baritone's tessitura is a4. I could be wrong but I'd say that's what happened.

Khan is my biggest influence on vocals but my tessitura is only a d#4 so I'm practically a bass, I recently did a cover of "Shy" by Sonata Arctica which went alright, I can post a link if you wish.

I am also getting trained by a vocal coach who proposed the idea of downtuning which seems like a good idea from what posters on here have said

I went through Karma with my coach last week and they lowered the key from d#m to a#m, so I could do the song in drop c in hit some low falsetto notes or use a seven string and do the song in drop c.
#12
gorkyporky Like Blind Guardian I think they tune down live to avoid straining, Khan on some live shows used some death metal vocals in the verse like in Karma on one live show.
#13
Quote by NeoMvsEu
The Haunting requires drop C#....[ ]....
Not to mention Simone Simons....

Quote by kingoffretboard
NeoMvsEu ...[ ]...Khan is my biggest influence on vocals but my tessitura is only a d#4 so I'm practically a bass,
Actually, the church doesn't feel that.way. The baritone and soprano parts, (actually the same part on the G cleff) don't really go above Eb4. (Which you insist on calling "D#4"), I think it's a flat, as your range stops before E4, which traditionally would make the note a flat. Yeah, I know, but you can go past D4. which would make it a sharp.

In any event, "Hark the Herald Angels Sing", is a prime example of keying for "the singer who just walked in off the street". "Hark" makes a great subject in the Key of G, (open position for guitar). However, when you crack a hymnal, you'll see it in F, or even as low as E. This is despite the fact that "Hark" in the key of G, only carries E4 as it's highest note.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 9, 2016,
#14
In any case, i think you are overthinking this and making a bigger issue out of it than neccesary. If you are working on this songs with your vocal coach, im willing to bet he is acompanying you on a piano. Just transpose the song into your range when you do it. I do a bunch of songs on my singing lessons that we transpose like a tone down because they are out of my range, and its not a big deal. It would be different if you had to sing this songs with a band for covers or whatever. If you are not doing that, then just dont stress to much about it. If you actually are in a power metal band, just write material that you can sing with confidence, and for covers just choose the ones that you can either already sing or that you can transpose into drop C or whatever.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.