#1
Hey, guys!
I began learning some Coroner songs and I get confused when trying to figure out if a particular song has one or more scales. Nosferatu, for example, is pretty complex and I can tell it begins with an ascending E minor scale, but then it goes out of its boundaries later in the song. I want to get my theory straight, so if you people have any tips I will be very grateful.

Have a nice day!
#2
Quote by Grimkrieg
Hey, guys!
I began learning some Coroner songs and I get confused when trying to figure out if a particular song has one or more scales. Nosferatu, for example, is pretty complex and I can tell it begins with an ascending E minor scale, but then it goes out of its boundaries later in the song. I want to get my theory straight, so if you people have any tips I will be very grateful.

Have a nice day!
Quote by Grimkrieg
Hey, guys!
I began learning some Coroner songs and I get confused when trying to figure out if a particular song has one or more scales. Nosferatu, for example, is pretty complex and I can tell it begins with an ascending E minor scale, but then it goes out of its boundaries later in the song. I want to get my theory straight, so if you people have any tips I will be very grateful.

Have a nice day!
Quote by Grimkrieg
Hey, guys!
I began learning some Coroner songs and I get confused when trying to figure out if a particular song has one or more scales. Nosferatu, for example, is pretty complex and I can tell it begins with an ascending E minor scale, but then it goes out of its boundaries later in the song. I want to get my theory straight, so if you people have any tips I will be very grateful.

Have a nice day!
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
Last edited by John Swift at Jul 9, 2016,
#3
How many scales do you think Clapton, Beck, Green etc knew, I started in 1962 when all solos were worked out from the chord sequences/stricter. How do you think the great lead breaks in years gone by came about.
I can assure you scales were only found in shops back then, oh and on fish.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#4
How many scales do you think Clapton, Beck, Green etc knew, I started in 1962 when all solos were worked out from the chord sequences/stricter. How do you think the great lead breaks in years gone by came about.
I can assure you scales were only found in shops back then, oh and on fish.

G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#5
Pretty sure we've been using the major scale, in its current incarnation, since about the 16th century...
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Jul 9, 2016,
#6
What you do, is you know the patterns, which are generally similar, and which are most often major, or its relative, and then you play the one that fits, and then if none of it works at some point, then they switched to something else, if one note is different, you need to change one note.

That's the general rule. Some music will fit multiple scales at a time, and some of it changes for every chord.

You can use trial and error to figure that out, or theory, which can get complex, if you want to do it that way, and most of the time, is not really necessary, imo.

If you are advanced enough with major scale, look into modes, and when in a minor one experiment with other minor ones. But this is not recommended if you don't know your basics yet, and it isn't a magic solution to make your soloing interesting, and doesn't always work well. In fact I seldom ever play any music where it does, personally.
#7
Find the key first. A song doesn't necessarily use many different scales (usually it doesn't) even if it uses notes outside of the key. Usually accidentals have a better explanation than "first they use scale X and then they change to scale Y". Learn about harmony and all the accidentals start to make more sense.

Do you have any examples of songs that you are having a trouble with understanding?

Quote by John Swift
How many scales do you think Clapton, Beck, Green etc knew, I started in 1962 when all solos were worked out from the chord sequences/stricter. How do you think the great lead breaks in years gone by came about.
I can assure you scales were only found in shops back then, oh and on fish.


Just because people back then didn't know much about scales doesn't mean you shouldn't learn about them. I do agree that scales aren't everything, but if you want to understand anything about theory, the major scale is one of the first things that you should learn. Western music is pretty much based on it.

And scales have been part of music theory for a long long time. It's not like they are a recent invention. But people today know more theory because of accessibility and also because people have started taking genres like rock and pop more seriously and there's also formal training for those genres.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Quote by steven seagull
Pretty sure we've been using the major scale, in its current incarnation, since about the 16th century...
Exactly. Not very long at all, really...
#9
Intro is in Am, then goes into Em when the electric guitar kicks in. Most of the song is based around the E minor/harmonic minor scales (both D and D# are essential notes in the main riff, so I dont want to call it Em with accidentals).

At work atm, so cant give details about the later part. The tapping part is a circleprogression, but I dont remember the key. Theres also a solo in Dm if I remember correctly, will listen to it when I get back home.
Last edited by Thrasherx00 at Jul 12, 2016,
#10
The point is to look at the harmony. What scales are being used makes a lot more sense when you look at the harmony. Most of the song is basic harmonic minor stuff. It has some key changes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#11
As said above, acoustic intro is in Am, and the rest of the song is mostly in Em. There is this part at 0:57 where they do a riff in Bm for some bars, then repeat it in Dm for some bars, which are technically modulations, but they are so short thay you might aswell call them chordchanges.

The tapping stuff at 1:46 is a circleprogression in Cm: Cm - Fm - Bb - Eb - Ab - F - Bb - G, followed by a solo in F#m, which later modulates to Bm, before going back to the main riff in Em.

Use minor and harmonic minor scales for the correct keys.


You should get Transcribe (or other similair programs) for learning songs, especially fast ones. Allows you to slow down the song (which is very much needed if you want to get this one note for note), and allows you to put small sections of the song on repeat. When learning fast solos, I usually chop it up into sections of some seconds each, then slow it down by 50%. Makes you able to get the details that you most likely would have missed if you just tried to learn it at full speed.
#12
Thanks very much guys! You've cleared a bunch of my questions.
Thrasherx00

I'm pretty much a noob to music theory but I recently came upon modulation and it blew my mind, so now I understand what's going on in the song.