#1
Setting aside the type of material (which inarguably makes a difference), does the design of a slide make a difference?

I'm specifically curious about the close ended bottle neck (like Derek Truck's signature slide: https://www.amazon.com/Dunlop-Derek-Trucks-Signature-Bottle/dp/B004ZPDNJ6) versus your plain ol' vanilla pyrex slide.

To those who have used various types of slides, how do they affect your technique? Do some make it easier to navigate the fretboard, reduce string noise, easier to mute, etc? What type do you prefer?

Thanks y'all
Last edited by ElectricMan5 at Jul 9, 2016,
#2
It makes no difference. It's merely a fashion statement. Glass is glass.
Glass slides are the easiest slides to learn on but once you get good it makes no difference either. I have slides made from all types of shit but I prefer steel. I am a Rose Tattoo type of slide guitarist and steel works best for me for that.
Just get one that fits nicely and buy several different materials until you find what suits you best. There is no right or wrong way.
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#3
Quote by Cathbard
It makes no difference. It's merely a fashion statement. Glass is glass.


Yeah. Glass is glass. The only other thing that really matters is weight. A slide with a closed type might weigh more since there is that extra material, but the difference is honestly negligible since it's probably such a slight difference and slides already come in multiple lengths and therefore weights as well.

Quote by Cathbard
Just get one that fits nicely and buy several different materials until you find what suits you best. There is no right or wrong way.


Also don't be afraid to try things that aren't slides. I've used all kinds of things as a slide when I didn't have a real one on me. Most non-slide objects don't work as well since they tend to not be as easy to handle (I have to point out that I use those things, such as my phone, mainly for playing Dobro if I am at a music store and don't have a tone bar on me) but you might still like it. Zippos are a classic slide substitute. If you have one that isn't being used, considering trying it out.
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Last edited by theogonia777 at Jul 11, 2016,
#4
Thickness matters more with glass slides. I have a really thin glass dunlop slide and it doesn't sound as good as my thick walled dunlops.
Still, I never use it any more. I'm a steel man.
And if you want to try ceramic take a look at Rocky Mountain Slides. They are real ceramic made from actual clay and not a paste.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#5
I think that thicker wall makes for better sustain in any material, I would expect type of glass to have make very little difference, especiallt whne compared to other factors. FWIW, use heavy brass Dunlop slides and genuine wine bottle necks.

I should try ceramic, I haven't seen one around here recently.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
I think that thicker wall makes for better sustain in any material, I would expect type of glass to have make very little difference, especiallt whne compared to other factors. FWIW, use heavy brass Dunlop slides and genuine wine bottle necks.

I should try ceramic, I haven't seen one around here recently.


Agree with cath on thicker walled glass
The main advantage for thicker walled slides, IMO, is the weight. You don't have to apply so much pressure and risk fretting out.
The weight of the slide provides much of the pressure on the strings you need, so you only need to apply a little bit of pressure with your fingers.
BTW, I generally play in standard tuning, or open Dm, Open E, or Open G and I do not raise the action.

Playing without raising the action does take a little more practice and finesse though.
I was kinda forced to though as when I started playing slide because I only had one guitar.

And those plastic Bic lighters work fine in a pinch, so will a screwdriver, but I prefer the Bic.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Jul 12, 2016,
#8
I like thick brass slides the most. I don't know if that would be best for someone just starting out on slides though. the weight can be a little hard to get used to.
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#9
Brass is the last thing I'd recommend to a beginner.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#10
I really want a tungsten carbide slide.

I just don't want to pay the asking price...
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