#1
I love bass and have found a rather interesting bass channel (Adam Neely). Some of his theories are rather fascinating.

He recently uploaded a video on "Harmonic Polyrhythms" about how harmony and intervals are related to polyrhythm in a way. It's rather interesting.


Another video has him play a bassline to a rather famous clip from The Simpsons. It's about translating speech to notes on an instrument and by extension, notation. Got any more information on that concept? I might try notating some of Bill Cipher's lines from Gravity Falls and incorporate them into a composition.


Here's his lesson on Walking bass (an autotuned song that explains walking bass wonderfully). Someone posting a video of this is what caused me to discover this wonderful channel.


Also what kind of rhythm is playing at 11:18 in Meshuggah's "Elastic" (the outro where all the songs on that album are synced and seemingly harmonized) and how would one attempt to notate that?


What do you guys think.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
Last edited by RonaldPoe at Jul 20, 2016,
#2
I'm actually really surprised someone else watches Adam's videos.

His stuff is very interesting, and the video he made yesterday about harmony and polyrhythms was very interesting.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#3
Quote by RonaldPoe
Another video has him play a bassline to a rather famous clip from The Simpsons. It's about translating speech to notes on an instrument and by extension, notation. Got any more information on that concept?

Microtonal bends and a wah pedal are your friends, Steve Vai has done a fair bit of stuff along those lines.

Yankee Rose intro


This track is basically nothing but an exercise in exactly what you're describing
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#4
Recopied from duplicate thread:

1. I commented on that video, but not about what you're talking about.

Frequency is the amount of [something] a second. If you amp the speed of a periodic sound up enough, the something will happen n times a second, n a frequency we can hear (probably somewhere between 20 and 20K Hz).

Stack something proportional and you'll find a JI interval.

2. Know rhythm. Catch the base frequency of the voice (the pitch). That's a good start.

3. That was MaggaraMarine.

4. Do you have to notate everything? Remixing is often an informal art, and mashups even more so.
#5
I'm glad I made you discover something new.

Yeah, I like Adam's channel. Lots of interesting music nerd stuff.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
Crap, there was a duplicate of that thread (wish that didn't happen). Anyway thanks MM for introducing me to that channel. I tapped to the rhythm of the Meshuggah song (that part I mentioned) on a desk and figured out part of the rhythm (I think). I might write a drum part based off that. I've been busy remixing, composing electronic music, and practicing guitar and bass (that's why I haven't been around lately). I guess I'll explore some of these concepts myself.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#8
I follow Adam Neely's channel every Monday. His "harmonic polyrhythms" video was super interesting to the synth player in me. His videos on chord charts helped me get through my first few weeks playing keyboards in a wedding band.
#9
I love Adam's channel as well and some of his music too. A lot of his videos are kind of trivial but still interesting (like the harmonic polyrhythm one has next to no real world applications but it's still really cool) but he also has a lot of great lessons that actually teach and inspire. Great channel all in all.

Also, this is pretty much the best thing on youtube. Start at 5:40:

Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here