#1
Hi! So i been learning some music theory for the guitar lately and i have a question about triades. So for example we have the G scale which is G A B C D E F# and if we want to get a G major we get G B D. So my questions are 2:
1st: How do we choose in which string we will play a note, does it matter ?
2nd: How do we know which open notes to play, if we need to do a bar like in G minor etc..
Thanks
#2

1st: How do we choose in which string we will play a note, does it matter ?

Well, different chord voicings sound a bit different. If you are just strumming chords, it doesn't matter that much. But if you want to play a "chord melody", then the voicing does matter. If you are just strumming chords, find chord voicings that are easy to play and that are close to each other. If you are playing a chord melody, the highest note is the melody.


2nd: How do we know which open notes to play, if we need to do a bar like in G minor etc..

Well, open strings are E A D G B E. G minor has G, Bb and D so the open strings that you could use are D and G. But you don't have to use open strings. Again, use chord shapes that are close to each other and easy to play.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 13, 2016,
#3

MaggaraMarine

So if i tuned my D string to F# and played a G it would still sound good because F# belongs to the key of G right ?
#4
Quote by skulled13

MaggaraMarine

So if i tuned my D string to F# and played a G it would still sound good because F# belongs to the key of G right ?


It would sound fine but it would change the chord to Gmaj7. It would change the sound of the chord - you would add an extra note to it. It wouldn't be a G major triad any more (because you would no longer be using only G, B and D - adding an F# to it changes it to a Gmaj7). And if you are after the sound of the G major triad, then playing a Gmaj7 wouldn't sound right.

(Also, I don't know why you would tune your D string to F#.)

Also, remember that not all chords are built on the tonic. For example G7 is not diatonic to the key of G. It has an F in it. This doesn't mean it doesn't sound good. It just means it's not diatonic to the key of G. Dominant 7 chords are built on the 5th scale degree. So G7 would actually be built on the 5th scale degree of C major.

When building chords, you may not want to think about scales. Chords are built from intervals. To build a maj7 chord, you need the root, major 3rd, perfect 5th and major 7th. These notes can all also be found in the major scale of the chord root. But as I said, this doesn't apply to all chords. The dominant 7th chord is root, major 3rd, perfect 5th and minor 7th. The minor 7th is not found in the major scale of the chord root.

So learn about intervals.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 13, 2016,
#5
The F# tuning was just a situation so i could express my question. Now i understood and will take a look at intervals. Thanks mate
#6
Quote by skulled13
Hi! So i been learning some music theory for the guitar lately and i have a question about triades. So for example we have the G scale which is G A B C D E F# and if we want to get a G major we get G B D. So my questions are 2:
1st: How do we choose in which string we will play a note, does it matter ?
As long as you have at least one of each of those 3 notes, then you have a G major chord.
Of course, you have lots of options - lots of places on the fretboard where those notes occur - and the shape and position of the chord that you might choose at any time depends on (a) the context and (b) how easy it is to play.
Generally speaking, guitarists go for the easy shapes, and that's where the "contexts" come from!
Quote by skulled13

2nd: How do we know which open notes to play, if we need to do a bar like in G minor etc..
The common shape for G minor includes no open strings, and is a barre on 3rd fret: 3-5-5-3-3-3 (G-D-G-Bb-D-G)
The open G and D strings could be part of the chord, but then its hard to incorporate a Bb note while also avoiding the open B string. This shape is possible: 3-1-0-0-3-3 (G-Bb-D-G-D-G) - but an awkward stretch for most people. The bottom 3 strings (3-1-0) are a complete G minor chord, and easy enough, but then you have to avoid the other strings.
This shape: 3-x-0-3-3-3 is another option (G-x-D-Bb-D-G), muting the 5th with the finger on 6th string, but again is a little tricky for most beginners.

However, once you become comfortable with various shape or position options for each chord, then you can start to exploit the different sounds of each shape, which is when that element of choice becomes important. (Advanced players will often choose quite strange shapes for some chords, because those shapes give the unusual sounds they want.)

The really useful thing you can do now (if you're not already doing it) is to learn the notes on your fretboard (beginning in open position, frets 0-4). Then - combined with the chord knowledge you're picking up - you'll be able to form any chord you want anywhere.
Last edited by jongtr at Jul 14, 2016,
#7
Mhh, nice. Thanks for the help, im just beggining to learn the theory because i want to be able to write songs and will defenitely apply that knowledge like you said.