#1
Was watching one of the late Gary Moore's interviews and it was known that he added a jazzy touch to his playing in his later days. Always wanted to learn some jazz to add to my playing but have always found myself clueless at to the modes and progressions. I was wondering what scale or mode he was playing in this clip at 3:24 and where to start with learning it.

#2
A major with a lot of borrowed chords.

It'd probably make more sense with band context.
#3
It's a mix of pretty random stuff. I just worked out the first 10 seconds or so.

3:27 - Ama7 chord followed by mostly A major chord tones with chromatic approaches.
3:31 - Dm7 chord, followed by descending D dorian scale run, ending in implied A7 chord (C# E and G chord tones, passing F and C chromatics)
3:38 - Am7-E7#9, followed by Edim7 arpeggio; descending chromatic line leading to (3:40) rising A69 (A major pent) arpeggio, with a G# including a couple of b3 approaches to 3. (Ie, A major scale, but framed around an A major chord shape, in and out of the tones.)
3:42 - Fmaj7, followed by C major scale line embellishing the arpeggio.

That's as far as I care to go, but as I see it it's all about the chords. The Dorian scale descent is the only part that doesn't refer directly to the chords (it follows a Dm7, but doesn't outline the chord tones, other than starting on an F). Inasmuch as he is thinking about it at all (not just on autopilot), he's thinking chord tones and embellishments (chromatic approaches, extensions) rather than scales.

Your route to learning how to play like that is twofold, IMO:

1. Learn all your chord shapes and arpeggios.
2. Use software to slow down licks or solos like this - or any part of them - that you like, and try to see the notes in relation to any nearby chord. Which notes are chord tones, and which are passing or approach notes? What relation do any accented notes have to the chord?

Assuming you already know some scale patterns, learn what notes they contain, and what chord shapes/arpeggios are contained within them (every scale pattern contains several chords). Always work from chords first, not scales.
Last edited by jongtr at Jul 15, 2016,
#5
If you like adding jazz voicing to your playing, check out Robben Ford. He is one of the masters at exploring jazz phrasing within blues and rock.

"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Cajundaddy Ford is one of the best with tasty blues runs..and the "tele" earns its keep...
play well

wolf
#7
Haven't got time to listen properly to all of that section.

But first couple of chords are C#m7 (9 x 9 9 9 x) and Dm9 (x x 10 10 10 12), and he's playing a lick out of C# natural minor (kind of a Charlie Parker rip-off) on the first chord and D Dorian on the second chord ... next couple of chords he's using what sounds like a minor ii-V (part of F# m7b5 (x x 10 9 10 x) to part of B7#5 (x x 7 8 8 x) setting up an Em7, but instead goes to a G (which would act a n Em if there was an E in the bass)... and he's playing a lick from E diminished over the B7#5 which is an odd choice, and if that chord was still ringing, would clash somewhat ... but that said, it would be fleeting.

If you want to get a touich of jazz into your playing, learn a few Dorian licks (against m7 chords), and learn a couple of altered scale licks. The latter is used to set up the following chord. So if target chord is E (major or minor), you can use B altered scale. (i.e. root the scale a 4th below, or a 5th above, the root of the target chord) ... it's a wonderful sound ... I use it loads.

Altered scale (1,b9,#9,3, b5, #5, b7)
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jul 17, 2016,
#8
Jerry, he's playing the A open string, x06600, which is Amaj7.

This is all I care to transcribe right now (without written extensions):


e|-0-----0---------|----------------------------9-12---9----|
B|-0-----0---------|------------------9-12-9h10----------10-|
G|-6-----6---------|-------------9-11-----------------------|
D|-6-----6---------|-------10-11----------------------------|
A|-0---x-0-----x---|-12-14----------------------------------|
E|-----------------|----------------------------------------|
   A


e|-12---11/12-13---12-10----------------------------------------------------|
B|-8---------------------13-12-10-------------------------------------------|
G|-10-----------------------------12-10-9----9--------------------9-12-10-9-|
D|-10-------------------------------------12---10-9-12----9-10-12-----------|
A|-----------------------------------------------------12-------------------|
E|-10-----------------------------------------------------------------------|
   Dm


e|------------------------------------------------------------------|
B|-----------------------------10---8b---6-5------------------------|
G|------9------9-------------------------------5-7--7/9---7/9~~~~~~-|
D|-10b----10b-------------11----------------------------------------|
A|------------------------------------------------------------------|
E|------------------------------------------------------------------|
   A


e|-5---------------------------------------7-----5-----4---------------------|
B|-5---8-------------------------------5-7-----7-----6-----5-----------5-----|
G|-5---7---------6-9b--9-8---7\6---5/6-----------------------6---5/6-----6---|
D|-----6-----5-8-------------------------------------------------------------|
A|-7---7---7-----------------------------------------------------------------|
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
   E                           A


e|-5--5-------------------------------3---5---|-5/7---5----4h5--------3---|
B|-5--5-----------------------3-6-3-5---------|----------7-----5------3---|
G|-5--5-------0-----2-5-2h4-------------------|------------------6----3---|
D|-3--3-----2---2-3---------------------------|-----------------------1---|
A|-5--5---5-----------------------------------|-----------------------3---|
E|--------------------------------------------|---------------------------|
   Dm                                            A                    Cm
#10
If you want to incorporate jazz into your playing, start by listening to actual jazz - the reference point for blues is Miles Davis Kind Of Blue - check out Freddie the Freeloader etc. and really listen to the solos, which are legendary.

Studying guys like Robben Ford is getting ahead of yourself, go to the source - Charlie Christian, Wes Montgomery, Grant Green - learn some of their lines and you'll have a better grasp of things.
#11
Help The Poor from the album Talk To Your Daughter is a good starting point for Robben Ford.

This song has a classic minor blues progression.

Brilliant phrasing with just D minor blues with occasional 9th, and a 6th.

Note the Ab at 2:33. This is a b7 chord tone / guide tone in relation to the keyboard chord, Bb.

You can here perfect use of the A super locrian scale at 2:54. Beautiful sound when it's that tasteful, huh?

And again at 3:40

Last edited by mdc at Jul 20, 2016,
#12
If you want to here great use of the major 6th, listen to the sax solo 2:15 onwards.

#13
You can here the worlds finest play over the same progression and key here...

These early videos are what got him known to the world....


... Sorry


#14
Gotta love G.G. with his astounding command of the fretboard and his own concoction of Jazz shred. He doesn't leave a lot of space in there so I can only listen for a little while but it is a very good example of pure technique at the highest level.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#15
Maybe off topic, but if you want to hear an amazing Robben Ford album check out - Live at Yoshi's - he's on acoustic with Roscoe Beck on bass, a piano player and drummer as well - it's ferocious! Best acoustic flat-picking blues album I've heard yet from a guitar standpoint.
#16
Cajundaddy Love Guthrie, he's a force of nature, along with Kurt Rosenwinkel and Julian Lage - they are among the most amazing guitarists today. That being said, they all need a lesson in restraint from Mark Knoplfer!
#17
Quote by reverb66
Cajundaddythey all need a lesson in restraint from Mark Knoplfer

I always find the comments in any of his videos to be rather amusing.

#18
mdc I'm not saying he's incapable of playing with restraint, he just very rarely does it. I know Guthrie's work backwards and forwards ( solo album, videos and Aristocrats albums) - same goes with Julian Lage and Kurt Rosenwinkel I am huge fan of all of them. They rarely put the brakes on.
#19
Guthrie is a phenom no doubt. I have only the highest respect for his technical excellence and his heart for other musicians. He just wears me out quickly while listening.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY