#1
Hey guys and gals, just discovered this:
http://logidy.com/?pid=1

Looks like they have a IR loader that can load both reverb/delay or cab sims and it costs $200, definitely worth checking out for those that are unhappy with their current digital sims or just want to add an extra channel of guitar to their board without bringing the heavy cabs to the gig.

I am thinking that this might be the bridging point of making a $300-$400 processor sound like $2000
#2
Quote by diabolical


I am thinking that this might be the bridging point of making a $300-$400 processor sound like $2000


I don't think the Logidy is the answer, but the Two-Notes Torpedo C.A.B. certainly is. Unfortunately, it's around $545 new.
#3
dspellmanYeah, that's way too much though, like buying a second processor. I know what it does but it'd be hard to justify. $200 is palatable, especially considering that you can run your own impulses.
Wonder how hard it would be to use one of these little appliance PCs ($70) with something using Linux and passing sound, might be an area of geekdom worth exploring.
#4
Quote by diabolical
dspellmanYeah, that's way too much though, like buying a second processor. I know what it does but it'd be hard to justify. $200 is palatable, especially considering that you can run your own impulses.
Wonder how hard it would be to use one of these little appliance PCs ($70) with something using Linux and passing sound, might be an area of geekdom worth exploring.


I usually find the gizmo that does the job and then adjust my budget accordingly. I'm nearly always disappointed when I select a random budget and then try to fit things into it.

"You can run your own impulses" is fine if you're willing to spend the time and money (studio space, mikes, etc.) fiddling around trying to make "your own impulses." You're not going to build impulses like the ones available for the C.A.B. for starters. Anything that requires a whole separate PC to run is hard to justify from where I'm standing. Someone at one of the shows (NAMM, perhaps) was explaining to me how cheap it was to run this and that, but he was running it all through a $2500 MacBook Pro. And the whole process of hooking all of this up involved more cables, more time and more points of failure.
#5
I only paid $500 for an Atomic Amplifire (they're $600 new) and it can load third party IR's. I spent 200 on a nice powered wedge and I'm set to go.
So $700 all up.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#6
Quote by Cathbard
I only paid $500 for an Atomic Amplifire (they're $600 new) and it can load third party IR's. I spent 200 on a nice powered wedge and I'm set to go.
So $700 all up.


I think computer based electronics are good for prototyping, or for figuring out what works and what doesn't. There are synths, for example, that you can load up on a laptop and that have setups that will function with a MIDI keyboard. But the ones that I can load into (and that work specifically with) my Korg Kronos make my life a LOT easier and require much less fuckwithage. Particularly important if you're playing live. It can all be DONE with a laptop or maybe an iPad, of course, but it's also more of a PIA.

One thing about IRs, loading and handling them. Not all IRs are created equal.

I was trying to figure out the C.A.B.'s IRs sometime back, because their files are waymuch larger and because you can "move the mikes around" (some have both close-mike and room mike) and change the emphasis on one or the other. Turns out that their files are actually libraries of IRs that, in the Two-Notes products, function as one "3D" sort of file. You can *sort of* do the same thing with individual files on other gizmos (say, 32 separate IR files with the mikes moved between each one), but you have to go into your file bank, load each one up and then listen, one at a time.

The C.A.B. can handle individual IR files as well, of course.

I'm also less than impressed when someone makes a big deal out of "doing your own" IRs. Probably 95% of the people who buy IR-using devices will never do that, or will be less than pleased with their results if they try.

What's currently knocking me out with IRs is their ability to model/mimic things other than amps or cabinets. It didn't occur to me that you could build an IR of a random high-end Taylor guitar (for example) being miked in a room. And that you could then run your piezo'd Yamaha cheapie's output into that IR and that it would come out sounding like that miked high-end Taylor.

Nice to see all this old keyboard technology hitting the guitar market.
#7
I tried loading up a Taylor IR into the Amplifire. It didn't make my Yammy SG sound like a Taylor acoustic at all.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#8
Quote by Cathbard
I tried loading up a Taylor IR into the Amplifire. It didn't make my Yammy SG sound like a Taylor acoustic at all.


I think Pete Thorn was using a Takemine acoustic guitar with piezos when he used the Taylor IR. It's in one of his weekly email-answering youtube blogs. And it was a Helix .

My Yamaha SG2000 doesn't sound very acoustic, either...
Last edited by dspellman at Jul 18, 2016,