#1
Hi from sunny England!

I was recently given a old and battered Gorilla GG20 practice amplifier.
I stripped it down in order to rebuild it to my tastes (new orange tolex vinyl, mesh, knobs etc.) and to see why it sounded so bad!
The speaker cone is torn one one side and has a hole on the other - case solved!
The amp is apparently called GG20 because it's speaker is 20 watts.
The back of the electronics box says 30 watts.
So I assume that whilst it came with a 20 watt speaker it can actually handle up to 30 watts.
The amp and speaker have no further spec provided other than "30 watt".....

My question is simply this - do these numbers refer to RMS or maximum output/peak power?

Thanks in advance for helping a newbie out
#3
It could also be the power consumption of the amp.
First amp I had was a little frontman. The back said something like "38 watts" but a recent Google search said 15 watts was the output.

Is it around something showing the voltage. Of the amp? Typically near the power cord.
#5
Liaztraht Thanks for the info - the box, near the power cord, says 30 watts, 230 volts AC ,50 Hz....
Last edited by benjeeman at Jul 16, 2016,
#6
Quote by benjeeman
Liaztraht Thanks for the info - the box, near the power cord, says 30 watts, 230 volts AC ,50 Hz....

Sounds like that Is the power consumption. Probably pushes 10-15 watts rms for output. From what I've seen, solid state consumes more power than it typically puts out.
I have a 100 watt fender ss head that consumes 300 watts or so.
Not sure about my newest head though.
#7
Quote by benjeeman
Liaztraht Thanks for the info - the box, near the power cord, says 30 watts, 230 volts AC ,50 Hz....

Those are the power input ratings. That's what the amp pulls from the mains. But Liaztraht is right, it's more likely around 10-15W output. Not positive about guitar amp manufacturers in particular, but pretty much any manufacturer of audio gear like hi-fi amps and especially car stereos will use whatever standard they can (there are several) to label the power output with the highest number possible without technically lying. There are several ways to calculate output power and there's no industry-wide standard in use.

Quote by Liaztraht
Sounds like that Is the power consumption. Probably pushes 10-15 watts rms for output. From what I've seen, solid state consumes more power than it typically puts out.
I have a 100 watt fender ss head that consumes 300 watts or so.
Not sure about my newest head though.


All amps consume more power than they put out. Otherwise you'd have greater than 100% efficiency.
#8
Quote by Invader Jim



All amps consume more power than they put out. Otherwise you'd have greater than 100% efficiency.


I knew there was a reason, just couldn't remember. Been a few years since I took electronics classes in college.
#10
And to the TS, replace the speaker with one that can handle the wattage, and if it's efficient it will sound louder.
Also make sure the replacement is the same impedance.
Last edited by Liaztraht at Jul 17, 2016,