#1
Hello,

Sometimes a piano or a guitar solo sound a bit different from concert to another, and from concerts in general to the original recording, like they add more chords or something. Is that improvisation that they do while playing live? or they play it before concerts and keep practicing
#2
It probably depends on the group, but generally I'd think they'd rehearse such things.
#3
When it comes to changing guitar solos, I would guess that's (at least partly) improvised most of the time.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#4
Whether they completely redo the solo or change a phrase here and there, I would say that it's improvisation to an extent. When it comes to taking an extend solo of a song (for instance, when I saw Slash with Myles Kennedy last year, he did a 35 minute solo on Rocket Queen), the band would rehearse how long the solo would be along with rehearsing queues on getting back into the song.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#5
Completely player dependent. Petrucci will rarely improvise while Robban Ford and Jeff Beck improvise every night. Different strokes.

"I think of improvising as composing - for me it's all about playing melodies. When I improvise, there's not a lot of real thinking going on, per se - it's more like riding a wave. and I know how to stand on the board." -- Robben Ford

"I don’t care about the rules. In fact, if I don’t break the rules at least ten times in every song, then I’m not doing my job properly. Emotion is much more important than making mistakes, so be prepared to look like a chump. If you become too guarded and too processed, the music loses its spontaneity and gut feeling" -- Jeff Beck
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jul 17, 2016,
#6
Quote by Cajundaddy
Completely player dependent. Petrucci will rarely improvise while Robban Ford and Jeff Beck improvise every night. Different strokes.

"I think of improvising as composing - for me it's all about playing melodies. When I improvise, there's not a lot of real thinking going on, per se - it's more like riding a wave. and I know how to stand on the board." -- Robben Ford


I definitely agree! When it comes to something like the blues, it'll be improvised night to night. Progressive genres would call for practice and rehearsal to get the changes down to a tee.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#7
Some songs lend themselves to improv, some are just right the way they are, "the pump" is just right in my opinion, Stones can improv all day long, mabe too much at times.
#8
Quote by aerosmithfan95
for instance, when I saw Slash with Myles Kennedy last year, he did a 35 minute solo on Rocket Queen


That sounds dreadful.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#9
Quote by theogonia777
That sounds dreadful.


It was pretty neat at first, but once it hit 10 minutes, I began to think "yeah, can we just get on with the rest of the gig, please?"
Skip the username, call me Billy
#10
probably also depends on the genre. for rock and metal, i feel like they generally do minimal improvising and just play different versions. or maybe they forgot what they did in the studio when recording the album and are too lazy to figure it out, so they just come up with a new solo to play for the tour.
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#11
If you're asking if that is what improvisation is, yeah but not really. There's a little to a lot of improv throughout an entire performance but when someone says improvise it is usually in reference to a band that jams (which is sometimes not entirely easy to tell because even if they aren't rehearsed jam bands can get to a point where they're familiar enough with each other that it almost goes full circle. In fact, heaps of songs have come out on the spot like magic). Jam bands, jazz musicians and blues guitarists are most known for improvised solos. However a whole song could potentially be improvised. Metal and shoe-gaze provide a framework that generally allows for a full song to be improvised if it were desired. To some extent it's the structure but also the decreased use of active chord progressions, allowing more use of modes, which got pretty popular in the late sixties with jazz and rock, though common in blues for a long time.

Generally a song can be an improvisation if one comes up with a riff while the singer improvises words. Once a riff is found it is almost always repeated leaving the question up to the singer. Jazz singers invented 'scat', which is improvised singing but with abstract syllables instead of words, allowing them to improvise the way an instrumentalist would. Which is actually how a lot of songs come together at first. But that's more in the solo category. Two songs that pop into my head are American Woman and Walk This Way which were legitimately improvisations. But millions of songs come together so quickly they could almost be called that.

But again when people talk about improv they're usually talking about solos. Though there are grey areas here too. The solo to Stairway was improvised but Page knew what he was going for, and it was also the third attempt that he chose. David Gilmour's style of soloing is actually to jam over the chords over and over, then out of this improvisation he takes the best parts and puts them together. Other solos just bleed improvisation. It may even be a capella, so there's literally no structure.

Performing the solo of a well known song, especially one that was actually improvised on the recording, but was so memorable to the fans that they want it note for note, can at times be an impossible task. Because there are often mistakes in the original, it would require rehearing mistakes to perfection. It's just not the most easy thing to do. And even if one could do it, either the player is lazy or he thinks the idea of rehearing an improvisation is dumb. If it was on the record it should be the same live, which is why it's a little different.

But again there is a little improv everywhere. it's very easy to add quick licks or trills to a familiar riff to make it more interesting. You can also do a purely rhythmic improv, where the notes or chords are the same but with some extra picking. But adding a little lick to a riff doesn't make you an improv god, unless you are actually really good at it
Last edited by eddievanzant at Jul 18, 2016,
#12
Quote by eddievanzant
If you're asking if that is what improvisation is, yeah but not really. There's a little to a lot of improv throughout an entire performance but when someone says improvise it is usually in reference to a band that jams [...]However a whole song could potentially be improvised. Metal and shoe-gaze provide a framework that generally allows for a full song to be improvised if it were desired. To some extent it's the structure but also the decreased use of active chord progressions, allowing more use of modes, which got pretty popular in the late sixties with jazz and rock, though common in blues for a long time.


Bullshit.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.