#1
Let me preface this by saying I have no knowledge of music theory except for the modes. I learned the song bold as love by jimi hendrix by ear. I stumbled upon people talking about the song, saying it had a I-V-VI-IV progression in the key of A. However, the chords of the song are A major-E major-Gb minor-d major. If it we a I-V-VI-IV progress wouldn't it be A-E-F-D? Also, what would a A-E-Gb minor-G progression (key of A) be?

Thanks in advance
Last edited by peteygonzo at Jul 18, 2016,
#2
A major has the notes

A B C# D E F# G# A.
Counting, F# is the sixth note. THIS IS NOT THE SAME AS Gb.

VI in this context is the chord made with the sixth note as root.

However, it should be vi, F#m, not VI, F#.

Counting thirds away (because chords in functional harmony are usually made by thirds) in the key, you get A and C# to go with that F#.

F#-A-C# is F#m. Minor chords are lowercase.

G is not in the key - the note is one half-step flat of the in-scale note - so the major chord around it it'd be bVII.
#3
Quote by NeoMvsEu
A major has the notes

A B C# D E F# G# A.
Counting, F# is the sixth note. THIS IS NOT THE SAME AS Gb.

VI in this context is the chord made with the sixth note as root.

However, it should be vi, F#m, not VI, F#.

Counting thirds away (because chords in functional harmony are usually made by thirds) in the key, you get A and C# to go with that F#.

F#-A-C# is F#m. Minor chords are lowercase.

G is not in the key - the note is one half-step flat of the in-scale note - so the major chord around it it'd be bVII.


Wow thanks man, that explains alot.
#4
peteygonzo Here is a fun visual trick for finding your chords in every key.

#5
Harmonize the key scale and you get the diatonic chords of that key.

    R  3  5
I   A  C# E  - A
ii  B  D  F# - Bm
iii C# E  G# - C#m
IV  D  F# A  - D
V   E  G# B  - E
vi  F# A  C# - F#m
vii G# B  D  - G#dim


What I did above was that I started the A major scale from the root (A), third (C#) and fifth (E). This way you get all the triads in the key and you can do it with any diatonic scale.

When it comes to theory, I would suggest starting with the major and minor scales and how they are constructed. Well, first you want to learn the intervals.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 19, 2016,
#6
It's very common to borrow chords from other scales (modes) rooted off the same tonic, just to add more interest.

So, if you have a chord progression mosty in A major, you could still add in chords from" A something" (e.g. A mixolydian, or A natural minor, or ...), and hence the G major is being borrowed from e.g. A natural minor, where G is the bVII chord of A natural minor,
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jul 19, 2016,