#1
Hey guys, i recently bought a taylor 416e from USA and flew with it to India. Just a couple of days after, the guitar lost its loudness and somehow doesn't sound the way it used to (Not even 1/10th of what it used to be just a week back when I bought it). And also the neck is bent in such a way that the action of first three strings is lower then the last three. Its difficult to find a service station for Taylor here in India. Does this sound like really bad? Do I need to worry? What should I do now?
#3
It sounds to me like the guitar has been exposed to high humidity. When guitars face extreme temps and humidity the wood can warp and twist. Often times a simple truss rod or saddle adjustment can counter balance mild warping but if has twisted you are looking at a very complicated fix. If you bought it from a authorised dealer then they might help you get it fixed or replaced. If it wasn't an authorised dealer then they might still help but otherwise you may be stuck going to a luthier.
Not taking any online orders.
#4
Quote by darshthakkar28
Hey guys, i recently bought a taylor 416e from USA and flew with it to India. Just a couple of days after, the guitar lost its loudness and somehow doesn't sound the way it used to (Not even 1/10th of what it used to be just a week back when I bought it). And also the neck is bent in such a way that the action of first three strings is lower then the last three. Its difficult to find a service station for Taylor here in India. Does this sound like really bad? Do I need to worry? What should I do now?
Well, I can't really tell if you're being hysterical or not. I mean "1/10 as good as it sounded", is quite a letdown, wouldn't you say?

As Tony pointed out, the neck could be loose, or it could be twisted as CurdorutEW suggests.

Your post doesn't really give too much useful information. The "first 3 strings" are supposed to be lower than, "the last three strings", if we're talking in terms of "the 1st 3 strings", being e-1, B-2, & G-3.

The humidity in the salon where you purchased was likely tightly controlled. What's cooking on the home front right now, with respect to temps & RH?

Did the guitar ride with you as a carry on, or was it in the aircraft's cargo hold. If it was in the hold, is the case TSA approved for air travel?

How much did you play this devil after you bought it? The strings could be shot.

Anyway, the neck bolts could be loose, and that would / could allow the neck to rotate on its mounts, mimicking a warped neck. It's not a sure way of telling, but try to see if the underside of the finger board end, is still parallel with the guitar top. (It might also be a bit difficult to gauge).

Measure the height differential on the strings you're talking about, name them, and supply us with those measurements, sil vous plait
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 19, 2016,
#5
Quote by darshthakkar28
Hey guys, i recently bought a taylor 416e from USA and flew with it to India. Just a couple of days after, the guitar lost its loudness and somehow doesn't sound the way it used to (Not even 1/10th of what it used to be just a week back when I bought it). And also the neck is bent in such a way that the action of first three strings is lower then the last three. Its difficult to find a service station for Taylor here in India. Does this sound like really bad? Do I need to worry? What should I do now?


Pictures, please.
#6
Guitars and airplanes are old enemies. If you shipped it in cargo, not onboard with you, it gets incredibly cold in there, humidity goes wacko, not pressurized, and the way baggage handlers throw things around if it's not packed well, be glad it's even in one piece. Some people with experience flying with guitars will reduce string tension and use towels or something behind the neck and in front to block the neck in position so that even if it is thrown around it won't break. They say you should barely be able to close the case for all the padding.

That still does nothing about humidity and freezing temps. The wood used these days is probably not cured as well as what was used years ago, I've seen guitars with necks that warped sitting on the rack at the store. Had a local store pull one a few months ago, Fender acoustic. The neck warped on the rack, brand new, and it had a hump where the neck joins the body, visible when looking from the tuning head, serious fret buzz starting around the 10th to 12th or so and useless above that. Wood not cured well enough can go wacko once under string tension as it dries.

Only thing I can advise is try to find someone who can handle warranty work around there, otherwise have a luthier look at it.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#7
i'm also guessing high humidity is the problem. do you use a hygrometer?
Quote by Skeet UK
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Last edited by patticake at Jul 21, 2016,
#8
Captaincranky The 1st string (high E) has 2mm height and the last one has 4.5mm height.
Its way too moist here as compared to where I bought the guitar from. And I carried the guitar as a carry-on in the plane.
#9
patticake I use a daddario two way humidifier. But I started using it just after I realised that the guitar is showing differences due to weather change
#10
Quote by darshthakkar28
Captaincranky The 1st string (high E) has 2mm height and the last one has 4.5mm height.
Its way too moist here as compared to where I bought the guitar from. And I carried the guitar as a carry-on in the plane.
OK, the E-6 should be about 2.6 to 3.00 mm. The e-1 is just about right.

Taylor doesn't setup their guitars as low as possible to begin with. They go for a healthy average, so that people with a heavy touch, aren't going to be bringing the instruments back with "buzzing" complaints.

Any one of the three possibilities we've discussed could still be in play. But, the first thing you're going to want to do, is sight across the lower bout, and see how convex it is. A 'bulging top", is the premier sign of humidity issues. Check that first.and get back to us.

High humidity kills tone, that's a certainty. You'll hear many players say, acoustics always sound best, right before they crack.

So, we've got high humidity, older strings, and high action. The high action on the bass side may be inhibiting your ability to fully fret notes, killing off a bit more tone.

Now, if we can determine the neck hasn't warped and the neck bolts aren't loose, we're going to try to get the humidity down in your guitar, and then do a setup as though it were a standard guitar, without a bolt on neck.

It's virtually impossible to cure side to side action height issues by re-shimming the neck. We need to grind the saddle for that. I know you're going to hear "Taylor has bolt on necks, blah, blah, you change shims". Think of the neck bolt and shim replacement as a "course adjustment", and grinding the saddle as a "fine adjustment". It won't affect anything in the future, with respect to shimming the neck. If you botch the saddle job, a few bucks will get you a new one. In fact, some players recommend having season specific saddles. When it's monsoon season, you're going to need a shorter saddle, and when the heat's on in the winter, a taller one.
#11
India is as humid as it gets, dude!  And even the passenger section of an airplane isn't very climate controlled.  Did you loosen the strings way down before you left? There has to be luthiers in any large city, anywhere. I just did a search for one in New Delhi and Mumbai and found plenty. I would suggest finding one as quickly as possible, and probably loosening the strings until I did. If you have no experience fixing guitars, maybe this isn't the one to try first.  But if you're going to try, listen to the cranky old guy.
Last edited by relayer1 at May 2, 2017,
#12
I don't think I'd let a 3rd world luthier work on a $2,000 guitar. 
Last edited by TobusRex at May 2, 2017,
#13
That's a big difference in string height between the E's(should be about .5 or so higher on the low side). My guess would be a loose bolt on that side. I would think humidiy issues would affect action on both sides but who knows? If you're not sure what you're doing, take it to someone who does. That's too expensive of a guitar to learn how to toubleshoot and set up yourself, although that is a good thing to learn. Being a new high quality guitar, it should be something that's easily fixed.
#14
I would recommend going to several shops just to get an "inspection" of the problem.  Compare the results with what you've learned here and then pick one to work on it.  A nice guitar like that going wonky is a heartbreak.
#15
And yet, we let third world luthiers in China, Korea, and Indonesia make most  of our guitars.  The alternatives are to work on it yourself, with possibly no background doing so even on a cheap guitar, or wait until you can bring it back to the States.  But maybe he is good at fixing guitars, hasn't said.  
#16
Quote by relayer1
And yet, we let third world luthiers in China, Korea, and Indonesia make most  of our guitars.  The alternatives are to work on it yourself, with possibly no background doing so even on a cheap guitar, or wait until you can bring it back to the States.  But maybe he is good at fixing guitars, hasn't said.  

There are some factors to consider, AFAIK, workers in modern Asian guitar factories are tasked one one or two operations, probably not more.

In the case of some makers, imported guitars are setup in the US. At least so claims Epiphone, in the case of my EJ-200's. I haven't had to touch either guitar in the two years or so since I've bought them.

Fender makes the same claim, but I haven't had anywhere near the luck with my Sonoran as I have had with the Epiphones. (The Sonoran was great out of the box, but the top bulged up quite a bit within a few months).
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 4, 2017,
#17
Quote by relayer1
And yet, we let third world luthiers in China, Korea, and Indonesia make most  of our guitars.  The alternatives are to work on it yourself, with possibly no background doing so even on a cheap guitar, or wait until you can bring it back to the States.  But maybe he is good at fixing guitars, hasn't said.  


I know. But we are talking different things here. on. Bob Taylor makes his guitars differently in a structural way than conventional luthiers at conventional guitar outfits overseas. Those guys can be perfectly competent but they still aren't 100% familiar with Taylor guitars. Taylors aren't very common outside the USA, in my experience. I saw more Rainsongs in the PI than I saw Taylors. 
#18
Don't know what Taylor does that is so unique.  Matsumoku made bolted on necks long before Taylor did.  Lots of guitars that sold in the US with bolt-on necks were Asian.  And this seems to be a neck problem.  But then, I don't own a Taylor, and have no intentions of changing that situation, so you would certainly know more about it than me.  
#19
relayer1 

As far as I can tell, Taylor are the only ones who make neck with a proper acoustic-style heel that is fully bolt-on and that doesn't need any woodworking if the neck angle is altered, and I see that as a big plus. Collings, Bourgeois, LaSiDo* (Seagull etc) and others use bolt-on necks, but AFAIK, the heel has to be shaved to adjust the neck angle, and most (not Bourgeois) used a glued fretwork extension that has to be unstuck and then reglued.

I patiently waiting for the day when the Asians make a guitar with the Taylor-style neck joint.

* They might recently have gone to epoxied neck joints.
#20
darshthakkar28

Agree it could be as simple as loose bolts. I wouldn't panic, but I do sympathize.

No authorized Taylor service in India. Lots in EU, and a dozen, or so, in Africa. (If you're a frequent traveler.)

Is there a university nearby with a Music department? Or Arts? They're often overlooked sources of info. And the folks there generally like to help.

All the best, and sorry to hear you're having problems with your new guitar.


Edit: & for others posting -- takes longer to type 'third world' than it does "India". Just sayin ...
Last edited by Blind Dog at Nov 13, 2017,
#21
humidity and rough handling are the main cause for the guitar to go out of wack.. a visit to a reputable guitar tech for needed setup is in order.. (that is if you're not familiar with setup). A carbon fibre acoustic electric would have been a better alternative.. (although extreme rough handling may damage it too.)
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.