#1
So, I picked up my first electric guitar last week and I've been having real fun with it. I only the bare basics such as chords and I can read tabs and such. I'm not sure if age has to do anything with it (it probably does), but I'm currently 12 years old and hitting some chords...well, my fingers aren't long or big enough to do it.

My goal is to teach myself guitar. I mostly listen to Dream Theater, Avenged Sevenfold, and Green Day and I want to work myself up. I'm going to ask for a seven string for my birthday and a better amp (birthday coming) and I just had some questions.

1) Is it worth it buying a seven string right now? I won't be good or professional at guitar by the time I reach my birthday.

2) Since I want to self teach, what is the best way to go about that route? My current goals are Dream Theater's Voices, Avenged Sevenfold's lead guitar for Save Me, and 21 Guns for Green Day. Once I heard those songs, I knew I had to master it.

3) I know how to read tabs and what should be the route for it? People say to go slowly, but every time I play slowly, I get stressed because it doesn't sound like the original.

4) How can I deal with the stress of failing? Taking a deep breath rarely works.

5) When I try to do chords, some strings make a buzzing sound and it sounds kind of muted. Why is that?

6) How long should I commit to practicing guitar everyday?

7) Are the bands I listed (A7X, Green Day, and Dream Theater) appropriate for my level?

Sorry for all these questions and thank you for taking your time to answer this.
#2
Okay, so I taught myself how to play at the same age (I'm now 14), I'd say maybe don't buy a seven string just yet. Learn to play the six string guitar first since you need to learn the basics before upgrading guitars. Start off with songs that use easier chords such as E, D, C, A etc. and get your hands used to them you should also purchase a guitar capo (not just for the early guitar stages, but later on too. So it won't be a waste of money.) After that work your way up to bar chords. You should start off slowly. Play the same part over and over, faster each time and you'll be playing like a pro! If you get frustrated put the guitar down and continue practicing after you cool down. It is easy to get bored of an instrument if you're forcing yourself to play. The buzzing sound comes from when your fingers are too far back on a fret. A few minutes to hours is fine for a day, as long as you aren't forcing yourself to play. The bands you listed are a bit advanced, but as long as you're enthusiastic/ determined you'll be fine!
You could ask me for guitar help anytime! Good Luck!
#3
^Pretty much it

One or two Green Day songs might be achievable in a couple of months, but A7X and Dream Theater are at least a couple of years down the line, no point worrying about them at this early stage.

Learning to play the guitar IS frustratiing, you can't achieve things by force of will - sadly wanting to do it isn't enough. There is a lot of hard work and practicing involved, but crucially also a long period where, to put it bluntly, you'll sound like shit. And there's no avoiding that, you'll sound like shit for a while - everybody does. You just have to keep plugging away, identifying your faults and working hard to correct them. That's why you can't simply look at a tab and play it, you need to already be good enough to play a song to be able to learn it. Even then even the best players still need to take time to learn new stuff and practice it, and we're talking people who will have been playing for years. Likewise you always need to start slow and speed up, but in the early days you'll struggle to do that with anything past very basic songs because of a lack of experience - it takes time for your brain to start thinking musically and to be able to do things like mentally slow down a song in your head so you can work out how to play it at that speed.

It's probably going to be at least 3 months just for the guitar to feel natural in your hands, until that happens everything you do will feel very awkward and forced and it's difficult to make any real progress during that period. The main goal at the beginning is simply to get your hands used to the feel of the guitar and get to grips with the fundamental mechanics of playing....fretting cleanly, picking accuratetly, following a rhythm, playing in time etc.

There's little point getting a 7 string, or even another guitar, until you're confident that you're going to make some progress and have the discipline and drive to learn - learning the guitar is complicated enough without the added complication of the extra string.
Actually called Mark!

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#4
Practice makes perfect.

When I was beginning to learn to play (constantly learning, it will never stop), I sat there, for half an hour each day (on top of my couple of hours minimum playing) just playing the major and minor scale in various keys. once I could do that flawlessly, I moved onto the pentatonic/blues scale. once you know your scales, it makes reading tab much easier as you actually understand what finger to use, and what forms the solos. start with the basics. don't worry about a 7 string, but look, a new amp may just encourage you to play more. Learn your open chords (E, A, D, C, G, Am, Em, Dm, ect) before you move onto say, barre chords. timing is important when playing too. get a metronome and practice with it.

as was previously said, those harder songs will come after bulk practice. don't worry about them just yet.
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#5
Quote by FeShreddale

1) Is it worth it buying a seven string right now? I won't be good or professional at guitar by the time I reach my birthday.


As others have said, getting a 7 string when you already have a guitar might not be worth it. And as of now, you don't even really know how your guitar playing will turn out, maybe in two years you want to start playing a classical guitar, maybe you want to switch to bass, just try to avoid big purchases before you get decent at playing the instrument and know that that particular instrument is the one you want to use.

Quote by FeShreddale
2) Since I want to self teach, what is the best way to go about that route? My current goals are Dream Theater's Voices, Avenged Sevenfold's lead guitar for Save Me, and 21 Guns for Green Day. Once I heard those songs, I knew I had to master it.



You don't actually want a self teach. Trust me. If you can get a teacher, get one. Being self taught is not "cool" as many people seem to think, you're just making things way more difficult than they need to be.

But a good start is to learn a lot of songs you like. After you can confidently play through a couple of tunes you can start worrying about other things. But learning how to actually play music should always be the focus.

Quote by FeShreddale
3) I know how to read tabs and what should be the route for it? People say to go slowly, but every time I play slowly, I get stressed because it doesn't sound like the original.


Playing slowly is pretty important. A good sense of timing and rhythm is absolutely necessary for any musician, and to really get good at it you have to practice slowly. It always feels awkward at first, but it's worth it.

Quote by FeShreddale
4) How can I deal with the stress of failing? Taking a deep breath rarely works.


Don't rush it and don't take guitar playing so seriously. It should be fun. Remember that it will take you years, quite literally, to become a good guitarist, and it will feel frustrating at the start. If you get too stressed, take a break, relax, and practice something a bit easier for a while. Everyone gets that reality check when they realize that they're actually still pretty bad after 3 years or so of playing, and it will probably happen to you too. You just need to remember that music is a lifelong endeavor, and 3 years is practically nothing. So take it slowly and try to have fun, and if you get frustrated, don't fear taking a break. In fact, I recommend taking breaks every now and then since it's really nothing but beneficial.

Quote by FeShreddale
5) When I try to do chords, some strings make a buzzing sound and it sounds kind of muted. Why is that?



What guitar are you using?

Two things that come to mind: the most likely one is that you're still a beginner. You're just not fretting properly yet. Keep practicing it, try to find out what strings are making the buzzing sound and make sure you fret those correctly.

The other thing is that it might be a cheap, badly setup guitar. You could ask a friend to set it up for you or something, or power through until you get a new one.

Quote by FeShreddale
6) How long should I commit to practicing guitar everyday?


Don't ask "how long", ask "what". 30 minutes of practicing something useful trumps 6 hours of aimless noodling. I think 1-2 hours is completely fine as long as you're actually practicing, not just holding the guitar and making noise. As asfer said, don't force it. If you're not feeling like practicing today, don't. Take that aforementioned break. If you can squeeze in that 30 minutes of efficient practice you'll go a long way, and honestly you can practice as much as you want, as long as you're actually practicing and not noodiling around.

Quote by FeShreddale
7) Are the bands I listed (A7X, Green Day, and Dream Theater) appropriate for my level?


Nope. Green Day, maybe yeah (don't know a lot about their music). Dream Theater, just wait a few years and you'll get there. There are easier DT and A7X songs out there sure, but for the most part you might want to stick to easier stuff for now.

Quote by FeShreddale

Sorry for all these questions and thank you for taking your time to answer this.


No probs I hope you have a good run with the guitar. But please, consider a teacher. You might not realize it yet, but it helps so much that you're just shooting yourself in the leg not considering one. Whatever route you take, take it slowly and don't panic if you're still an average player after 3-4 years, since most people definitely are. If you get frustrated, do something else. I play video games when I'm fed up with music heh. After a while, the desire to play will come back naturally.
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#6
Start with basic chords and learn some songs that use them. I'm pretty sure you could play some Green Day songs with just open chords (at least if you use a capo). There are plenty of chord tabs here in UG. Check them out.

After you can play open chords and change between them fluently, learn barre chords. Power chords are also pretty useful and most rock songs are based on them. After you have learned to play open, barre and power chords, you should have no problem with learning to play 21 Guns (or other Green Day songs). But as others have said, Dream Theater and A7X songs are much more difficult.

And as Kevätuhri said, starting to take lessons would be a good idea. A teacher knows what they are doing. They have taught beginners before and they know what works. People online may or may not. Also, if you have questions, you can just ask your teacher and you don't need to wait for random people online to answer. A teacher will give you immediate feedback. They will tell you if what you played sounded good and if you were doing something wrong. With a teacher you will not repeat your mistakes and you will not develop bad habits. A teacher will also teach you how to practice efficiently.

A good example why a teacher would be useful: You asked why when you play chords, you get this buzzing sound. The thing is, we can't really know. There can be many different reasons but without seeing you play it, we really can't tell you how to fix the problem. It most likely is your technique but it could also be a setup issue. A teacher could immediately tell you what the problem is. And even if we knew exactly what you were doing wrong, it is much easier to just show how to place your fingers than to try to explain it here. A teacher can easily show you what to do. Online forums aren't good for that.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 24, 2016,
#7
I encourage beginners to also look at playing and experimenting with the melody as well as the chords. I've never really seen the point of delaying getting into that side of music. They enjoy it ...
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jul 24, 2016,
#8
Particularly regarding a 7 string, I'd strongly advise holding off on it until you have a better grasp on a six. If you're having trouble with chords now, it'll be even worse when you have an extra string to handle and mute.
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#10
Quote by asfer11
Okay, so I taught myself how to play at the same age (I'm now 14), I'd say maybe don't buy a seven string just yet. Learn to play the six string guitar first since you need to learn the basics before upgrading guitars. Start off with songs that use easier chords such as E, D, C, A etc. and get your hands used to them you should also purchase a guitar capo (not just for the early guitar stages, but later on too. So it won't be a waste of money.) After that work your way up to bar chords. You should start off slowly. Play the same part over and over, faster each time and you'll be playing like a pro! If you get frustrated put the guitar down and continue practicing after you cool down. It is easy to get bored of an instrument if you're forcing yourself to play. The buzzing sound comes from when your fingers are too far back on a fret. A few minutes to hours is fine for a day, as long as you aren't forcing yourself to play. The bands you listed are a bit advanced, but as long as you're enthusiastic/ determined you'll be fine!
You could ask me for guitar help anytime! Good Luck!


Thank you very much for that! Your words encouraged me a lot. I was honestly getting quite frustrated, but reading all these answers helped me a lot a lot and I've become much more enthusiastic! And thank you for your offer, I will make sure to contact you anytime I need help.

Quote by steven seagull
^Pretty much it

One or two Green Day songs might be achievable in a couple of months, but A7X and Dream Theater are at least a couple of years down the line, no point worrying about them at this early stage.

Learning to play the guitar IS frustratiing, you can't achieve things by force of will - sadly wanting to do it isn't enough. There is a lot of hard work and practicing involved, but crucially also a long period where, to put it bluntly, you'll sound like shit. And there's no avoiding that, you'll sound like shit for a while - everybody does. You just have to keep plugging away, identifying your faults and working hard to correct them. That's why you can't simply look at a tab and play it, you need to already be good enough to play a song to be able to learn it. Even then even the best players still need to take time to learn new stuff and practice it, and we're talking people who will have been playing for years. Likewise you always need to start slow and speed up, but in the early days you'll struggle to do that with anything past very basic songs because of a lack of experience - it takes time for your brain to start thinking musically and to be able to do things like mentally slow down a song in your head so you can work out how to play it at that speed.

It's probably going to be at least 3 months just for the guitar to feel natural in your hands, until that happens everything you do will feel very awkward and forced and it's difficult to make any real progress during that period. The main goal at the beginning is simply to get your hands used to the feel of the guitar and get to grips with the fundamental mechanics of playing....fretting cleanly, picking accuratetly, following a rhythm, playing in time etc.

There's little point getting a 7 string, or even another guitar, until you're confident that you're going to make some progress and have the discipline and drive to learn - learning the guitar is complicated enough without the added complication of the extra string.


Oh wow! Thank you for your answer! Yeah, I should probably hold off on the 7 string. Been a bit too rash. And 3 months to feel natural? Wow, I still have long ways to go.

Quote by rocknroll93
Practice makes perfect.

When I was beginning to learn to play (constantly learning, it will never stop), I sat there, for half an hour each day (on top of my couple of hours minimum playing) just playing the major and minor scale in various keys. once I could do that flawlessly, I moved onto the pentatonic/blues scale. once you know your scales, it makes reading tab much easier as you actually understand what finger to use, and what forms the solos. start with the basics. don't worry about a 7 string, but look, a new amp may just encourage you to play more. Learn your open chords (E, A, D, C, G, Am, Em, Dm, ect) before you move onto say, barre chords. timing is important when playing too. get a metronome and practice with it.

as was previously said, those harder songs will come after bulk practice. don't worry about them just yet.


Ah yes, the scale. I've been told many times to practice the scale. Is it that important to memorize the scales? What's the point of the scales and is it just one scale? Is it C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C? Won't it help to just look at the tabs for those songs and practice? I've tried Wake Me Up When Septemer Ends from Green Day and the greatest problem for me was switching to another riff. They either don't flow properly, or my hands hurt from being stretched too much.

Quote by MaggaraMarine
Start with basic chords and learn some songs that use them. I'm pretty sure you could play some Green Day songs with just open chords (at least if you use a capo). There are plenty of chord tabs here in UG. Check them out.

After you can play open chords and change between them fluently, learn barre chords. Power chords are also pretty useful and most rock songs are based on them. After you have learned to play open, barre and power chords, you should have no problem with learning to play 21 Guns (or other Green Day songs). But as others have said, Dream Theater and A7X songs are much more difficult.

And as Kevätuhri said, starting to take lessons would be a good idea. A teacher knows what they are doing. They have taught beginners before and they know what works. People online may or may not. Also, if you have questions, you can just ask your teacher and you don't need to wait for random people online to answer. A teacher will give you immediate feedback. They will tell you if what you played sounded good and if you were doing something wrong. With a teacher you will not repeat your mistakes and you will not develop bad habits. A teacher will also teach you how to practice efficiently.

A good example why a teacher would be useful: You asked why when you play chords, you get this buzzing sound. The thing is, we can't really know. There can be many different reasons but without seeing you play it, we really can't tell you how to fix the problem. It most likely is your technique but it could also be a setup issue. A teacher could immediately tell you what the problem is. And even if we knew exactly what you were doing wrong, it is much easier to just show how to place your fingers than to try to explain it here. A teacher can easily show you what to do. Online forums aren't good for that.


Thank you! Are there any teachers you recommend? One thing I don't like about learning from a teacher is finding the correct teacher. I've seen many sites offering guitar lessons saying that they guarantee that I will play the guitar in less than 3 months or that there is a special for 55$ per hour, but I'm kind of skeptical.

Quote by jerrykramskoy
I encourage beginners to also look at playing and experimenting with the melody as well as the chords. I've never really seen the point of delaying getting into that side of music. They enjoy it ...


Experimenting with melody and chords? What exactly do you mean?

Quote by reincarnator
Particularly regarding a 7 string, I'd strongly advise holding off on it until you have a better grasp on a six. If you're having trouble with chords now, it'll be even worse when you have an extra string to handle and mute.


Ah, thank you very much. I totally understand now that I shouldn't think too rashly about getting that new 7 string Ibanez guitar. It can wait.
#11
And sorry Kevätuhri. I couldn't quote the entire text, but wow, a lot of information! Thank you so much for that. You really helped me out to understand the guitar much more better. Let's see how it will go.

Currently I have a Green/Black Crescent Electric Guitar, trying to save up for the Squier Stratocaster and I have the line 6 spider iv 30 amp.
#12
Obviously, these answers will be based on opinion, so I'll give you mine despite the fact I haven't read anything anyone else has said

1) Not really. I'd recommend you focus on having a good 6 string instead. Plus, you mentioned that you are having trouble with reach in general. 7 strings are thick, and pretty hard to play.

2) Learn the modes, and the circle of 5ths. Tab will be easy to navigate after that. Before that, I had trouble with certain note intervals while reading tab.

3) This questioned has strange wording. My response is; understand that you are a different guitar player, and individual. You will never sound like the original, and also take into account that most of us who are really good, and the few that are established put in a lot of work to get here, that is what makes us guitarists.

4) Don't take a deep breath, as you only fail when you fail, right now you are learning, and there is nothing at stake to make you fail. I went through a lot of stress when I was 8 trying to learn, but now, I am trying to learn left handed to play MAB songs, and I am not getting stressed since I know exactly what to do, I just can't. This is why I stress to younger players to learn the modes early on, do it on piano if you have to. I've only known them for about a year or two, and I feel way more aware of where I am when I play.

5) You are not fretting hard enough. I recommend working out your fingers with those exercice things that you squeez, also getting practice sessions that last until they hurt help a lot, just like trying to tone any other muscle in your body. Besides this, your action may be too high to fret correctly, or maybe even too low to vibrate correctly.

6) Until you are satisfied with something you have done, until you feel that you are better at doing something than when you started that session. Now that I am a better guitarist, I just solo until I am done blowing off steam, that helps me develop in all areas too.

7) Take out dream theatre and yes they are. The intro to Pull Me Under might be doable for you in a few months though.

Some extra advice for you: get into Van Halen. Eddies rhythm playing is also kindof lead like, and will help you, trust me. Once I learned eruption, I felt that I was way more capable than before. I started learning it at 11, finished at 12. It took me 9 months of daily practice (within reason, I wasn't super tenacious), and it still sounded kindof bad, but it was eruption alright. Here's a good guideline of order for somebody who wants to be self taught:
1. power chords (grunge songs, punk songs ( yes they are barred but just play them in powerchords anyway) and AC/DC songs)
2. Open Gmaj, Emaj and min, Amaj and min, Dmaj and min, C maj, Fmaj, and C2 (almost any song has some of these chords, also try strumming these to patterns in bluegrass songs and country)
3. Pentatonic, played often in E minor, A minor and major, D minor. (Any blues influenced rock song has this, this leads to the blues scale which isn't very different) also try artificial harmonics if you will.
4. Barre chords, learn major, minor, major 7th, and minor 7th, and know this starting from an E string root and an A string root.
5. Do this with the pentatonic, replace the minor 3rd with a 2nd (found in SRV solos). also, try the minor major change that can be found on let there be rock at 1:25. Learn to apply the flatted 5th (blues note)
6. Learn the modes and their positions, specifically in the key of C major.
7. Learn the Circle of fifths.
8. Learn double tap if you want, but experiment with open string harmonics.

Hope my advice helped. It may be confusing, but you can be cleared up with a quick google search or message to me, I'd be glad to help you. Remember that it is hard, but very satisfying to progress as a guitarist. Rock on!
#13
Quote by FeShreddale
Ah yes, the scale. I've been told many times to practice the scale. Is it that important to memorize the scales? What's the point of the scales and is it just one scale? Is it C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C? Won't it help to just look at the tabs for those songs and practice? I've tried Wake Me Up When Septemer Ends from Green Day and the greatest problem for me was switching to another riff. They either don't flow properly, or my hands hurt from being stretched too much.


There is no "the scale". People may be referencing the general minor scale, the general major scale, or the C major scale. The C major scale is all the natural notes, CDEFGAB. People reference these notes for the purpose of simplicity. The A minor scale uses those same notes too, just starting from A. Those notes are separated in such a way that they are not an even distance apart. Observe the black keys of a piano. Those are un-natural notes. The major scale goes (W for whole tone, or two frets, H for half semitone, or one fret) WWHWWWH.

Although they could also be recognizing the Pentatonic scale. This scale can be played in the Key of E minor, A minor, and D minor while still note going out of the C major scale. Penta means 5, as in the 5 note scale. It is missing 2 notes from the standard way of playing the major or minor scale.
Remember the E minor, A minor, and D minor pentatonic? Well, you can also play the G major, C major, and F major pentatonic while still using all natural notes (the key of C major). This is because they are the SAME as those other two. E minor = G major, A minor = C major, D minor = F major. These are called relative scales. Their only difference is which note in the scale is the root. This completely changes the feel of the song. If I play in E minor, pentatonic minor or the normal 7 note minor along to a backing track that is in E for a couple bars and then G for a couple bars, I will not have to move, and me not moving my fingers to a different key or scale will change the feeling of my jam completely, since my E minor pattern just turned into the G major scale. This isn't really something you need to be worrying about yet.
#14
^there's some good advice there, but please pretend that you never saw the word modes in there. It's one of the most misrepresented concepts in guitar playing but, more importantly, not remotely applicable to a beginner and will only confuse you further. Seriously, just forget you ever heard the word.

Quote by FeShreddale
Oh wow! Thank you for your answer! Yeah, I should probably hold off on the 7 string. Been a bit too rash. And 3 months to feel natural? Wow, I still have long ways to go.


Seriously, you'll know it when it happens!
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Jul 25, 2016,
#15
Quote by FeShreddale


Ah yes, the scale. I've been told many times to practice the scale. Is it that important to memorize the scales? What's the point of the scales and is it just one scale? Is it C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C? Won't it help to just look at the tabs for those songs and practice? I've tried Wake Me Up When Septemer Ends from Green Day and the greatest problem for me was switching to another riff. They either don't flow properly, or my hands hurt from being stretched too much.


Yes. that is a Cmaj scale you just listed. practice it in other keys, along with the minor scale and pentatonic. there are lots of different scales out there. having a foundation knowledge of these helps. practicing them can also help with stretching the hands. I find that yes, they are THAT important. learning them fluently will improve your playing, as you will start to pre-empt what comes next, and where to place your fingers in order to set up the next "riff" or pattern.
don't stop reading tabs, but don't just stick to them either. look at music theory and work on that. it's more important understanding music theory early on in your playing than it is trying to nail a song via tab.
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Quote by Roc8995
No.


Well, technically it could be done, but only in the same way that you could change a cat into a hamburger. It's an unpleasant process, and nobody is happy with the result.
#17
I'm not sure if age has to do anything with it (it probably does)


You're right, it does. You're too young to know this but, the younger the better so you picked a good age to start learning.

1) Is it worth it buying a seven string right now? I won't be good or professional at guitar by the time I reach my birthday.


Honestly, you already have a guitar so you don't need to buy that yet. I'm assuming you don't have a job or any means to make money so buying another guitar when you already have one that's perfectly fine to learn on is pointless right now. Wait a few years from now because who knows if you'll still be playing. Hopefully you stick with this but there's a chance you may not so it would be best to wait and enjoy what you have at the moment. That's just my opinion.

Since I want to self teach, what is the best way to go about that route? My current goals are Dream Theater's Voices, Avenged Sevenfold's lead guitar for Save Me, and 21 Guns for Green Day.


DEFINITELY start with something that will get you used to playing guitar and will help develop muscle memory, speed, and just overall finger strength as to warm you up for harder things. Start with Green Day and learn everything you like by them. You don't have to learn everything they play. Only learn what you like. You're doing this for fun and don't ever forget that.

I know how to read tabs and what should be the route for it? People say to go slowly, but every time I play slowly, I get stressed because it doesn't sound like the original.


I've been playing for almost 10 years and I can tell you that I still have that problem sometimes unless I know the song very well. Your best bet would be to look up someone on YouTube playing the song AND learn the tabs. If you start with Green Day like I mentioned above, you could try to start learning by ear because as far as I know most of their songs are fairly easy to play which would make them fairly easy to tab. That's up to you though. Do whatever you want but I suggest watching someone play whatever you're trying to learn.

How can I deal with the stress of failing?


Understand right now that anything worth your time will always require lots of practice and won't be just handed to you. You have to practice a lot. This means hours upon hours a day for the first year or so but if you truly enjoy what you're doing, this won't feel like work. You have to keep pushing towards learning that song that you want to master and once you do I promise you it's an amazing feeling.

When I try to do chords, some strings make a buzzing sound and it sounds kind of muted. Why is that?


You aren't pressing down fully or you're accidentally palm muting. Your hands are probably smaller since you're young but continue to practice those chords over and over again. Remember, you have to build muscles in your fingers to be able to play guitar.

How long should I commit to practicing guitar everyday?


There is no set answer for this. It's best to play as often as possible but you may not want to play for hours on end like I did back then. I play for around 3 to 6 hours a day and sometimes up to 8 hours straight. When I first started I can honestly say it was about the same amount of time.

Are the bands I listed (A7X, Green Day, and Dream Theater) appropriate for my level?


Green Day is. You should practice all of the Green Day songs you want to learn until you get them down completely. Move on from there.


I hope I helped. I really want you to keep playing guitar because it really is the most important thing in my life. Playing guitar is my stress reliever and it has saved my life more times than I can count. If you have any questions to my answers, ask away.
#18
Thank you guys very much.
It brings me joy to see how much this community cares.

Playing guitar has had only one downside for me. It's not stress or not being able to learn quickly. It's that I'm basically an "outcast" when it comes to this kind of stuff. My friends are all shopping, playing games, who knows what, while I'm staying holed up in my house practicing the guitar. I had to turn down some offers and has left a rift.

Anywho, it still is a blessing.
#19
You can play guitar and play games at the same time, I can assure you, works fine for me Honestly, if you're practicing guitar so much you don't have time to go out or see your friends you're maybe practicing a tad too much. But it's great to see that you have motivation.

And as I think I said already, taking breaks is only good for you, so take a break sometimes and hang out with your friends
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#20
Thanks Keva.
Your words mean so much. I'm memorizing the scales and taking your advice, though I have one problem.

I don't know if I'm holding the guitar wrong or something, but it's kind of meshing against my breasts and it doesn't feel nice at all. It feels uncomfortable. I try holding it close to my chest, but it's strangely out of proportion. Ouch.
#21
Honestly, that might be just because you're so young. I don't have any problems with comfort, but I'm 1,80m high (5'9'' in american) so I'm pretty sure the guitar is a lot larger in comparison to your size. That problem might just go away with time when you grow older, I'm not sure.

Here's a video from Justin, giving some tips about posture. He uses an acoustic, but a lot of it is still applicable:

Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here