#1
So I've been playing guitar for 3 years, and I decided about six months ago to try and get into playing stuff like Black Veil Brided and Falling In Reverse. Say what you want about these bands, but the guitarists are excellent at what they do, and since that is the type of music I want to make (more the excitement those types of solos give) and so I want to be able to play what they made and then move on to my own projects and apply what I learnt from their songs.

So, in high hopes I started googling how I get my speed up, found that a few recourses were recommending the same type of exercises (being "go up and down a scale a bunch of times every x times a week and you'll get faster) - so I diid that, saw huge progress to start with, and then it gradually slowed down - as expected, however it seems that I cannot progress any further without losing the accuracy and I feel like I have hit a glass ceiling. I can't seem to find many other exercises to help me hit my goal.

Do I just keep pushing forwards despite no apparent improvement (I don't expect overnight mastery, but after playing 660 bars per week, over a couple of months, you would see some improvement, right?) do I try something else? Are there any stretches that may help? Am I completely missing the point? Can only certian people actually achieve the goal of playing things to that level, regardless of the level of commitment.

Once again, I know that it took these people years to play what they can play, I'm not expecting to be that good, that quickly, but I would expect some improvement. I'm just feeling so discouraged honestly.
#2
Quote by fchfgvsabgf1
Do I just keep pushing forwards despite no apparent improvement (I don't expect overnight mastery, but after playing 660 bars per week, over a couple of months, you would see some improvement, right?).


Well first of all, counting your time spent playing in "bars per week" is silly Honestly this is the first time I've heard this one.

And what do you think you should do, quit? Of course you need to keep practicing. But the thing is, maybe you need to practice something different. Name a solo you like, and start learning that. If it's a really tricky one, just do it really slow. Actually learning to play guitar solos is much better than just running scales. And I wouldn't worry if I don't see any improvement in a couple of months - if you're not developing speed in a couple of years, then you might be doing something wrong. But a couple of months isn't that long if you want to learn how to shred or something.

Quote by fchfgvsabgf1
Am I completely missing the point?


Well, I'd rather play music slowly than scales really fast. So maybe you should start learning music.

Quote by fchfgvsabgf1
Can only certian people actually achieve the goal of playing things to that level, regardless of the level of commitment.


That's bullshit. Of course anyone can learn how to play fast. Practicing scales for a couple of months still doesn't really count as commitment, but if you keep at it for years you will get really good at it. I feel like, even though you're assuring it's not that, you're expecting great results way too fast and getting discouraged because of that. Be patient, and set realistic expectations, and you'll get better results. What solos would you like to learn? Give a couple of examples, maybe we can use that info to help you more.

Quote by fchfgvsabgf1
Once again, I know that it took these people years to play what they can play, I'm not expecting to be that good, that quickly, but I would expect some improvement. I'm just feeling so discouraged honestly.


Well, you did get some improvement? You said that you saw huge progress. You can't expect progress like that to last forever, if that was the case everyone would just be getting better at better until at age 60 you could play at 2500bpm since your speed development never stopped. Of course you hit a ceiling at some point. It's much faster to go from not knowing how to do anything to being able to play decently, than to go from an intermediate guitarist to a master. It's like leveling up in a game: the higher level you are, the more XP you need for the next level. So keep at it if you're patient and take breaks when you get frustrated, you will be able to keep your motivation up. And the maybe, after playing an another 3 years, you can shred some amazing solos.
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Last edited by Kevätuhri at Jul 24, 2016,
#3
Well, as you can tell, I keep a really close watch on my progress, I have a regular practice schedule that I keep up with, I wasn't expecting it to last forever, but it is the fact I have seen absolutely no progress

But thanks or the advice dude
#4
Kevätuhri gave some great advice.

Many people get into the pitfall of solely practicing scales up and down for months at a time, and I fall into that boat on occasions. You have to sit down, figure out the songs you like, and make an attempt and learning those songs. Taking your physical dexterity and musical knowledge and applying it to songs will help you out immensely. Start off with some easier tunes by your favorite artists before getting into harder stuff. For example, don't try playing an Animals As Leaders tune if you can hardly play something by, let's say, AC/DC.

Start playing music while progressively challenging yourself. If you find something challenging in a tune, take tat particular phrase and make an exercise out of it. There are great tools that can help you out with practicing. Hell, I use TuxGuitar (free alternative version of Guitar Pro) for practicing songs and exercises and slower speeds until I get them up to par. Remember, as Kevätuhri said: making the jump from beginner to a decent player happens a lot quicker than from going to an intermediate player to a virtuoso.
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#5
To all the accurate advice above, I'd add this warning: pure technique practise with little to no regard to working on musicality is a really bad idea. As part of a regime, of course, technque is there ... but it should be a small part.

When practising technique, you need to always be aware of what your body is doing and cut out any tension (any muscle) and minimise motion. That is impossible to observe other than at very slow speeds, and this intense focus let's the brain fine tune the pathways that control this.