#1
Hi, UG members!

I'm not a pro guitarrist, but I've played for 4 years. I've been interested lately in what is called tapping, as it is a good technique, especially for solos. However, I have two issues with it:

Most of times I start tapping just fine, but I always end up touching accidentally the nearest strings. I've practiced a lot, but I can't avoid touching those strings, so while I tap, I can hear those strings ringing in the background, not dominant in the sound, but annoying.

Also, tapping doesn't seem to sound as strong as with the pick. Is it my fault, my equipment's fault, or what? I have a starter guitar from the hammett series, and a Line 6 Spider IV 15 amplifier.

So, any tips? I can't rock out Silvera without tapping ;_;

Thank you in advance!
Stand on your feet, partner. We've still got things to do.
#2
String noise: you have to mute these other strings.

Loudness: you need to pluck the string with your tapping finger ... it's not just tap and lift. So, you can either pull the string towards your head, or towards the floor, as part of the release.
#3
What ^ said. To add to it~ I think that looking up YouTube videos of people tapping, whether it be your favorite musicians to just some tutorial made by some dude on the internet, is going to provide the best help you'll need.

A recommendation of mine is to look up Buckethead who does this thing called I THINK 4 finger tapping. You can actually, (which I do personally), use all 8 fingers to do this. It sounds gnarly as fuck and from the sounds of your choice of guitar I think you'll agree.

Let me know if I helped at all. Also, if you have any questions, ask, because I'd love to continue to help you out.
#4
Alright guys, I'll try those when I can thank you for your time :3
Stand on your feet, partner. We've still got things to do.
#5
For some tapping can be a really difficult technique to nail down, a lot of it comes down to practice though and finding the right way to practice it for you. Some scale shapes are better for tapping than others. Try and learn the tapping to Van Halen - Hot For Teacher intro, it's difficult but if you start slowly you'll be able to pick it up. It's a good one string tapping song that is actually played slower than it sounds. You could also try Muse - Reapers tapping intro. If you;re just starting it won't be easy, but it's more about the mechanics anyway

It'll literally just happen one day
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#6
I forgot to say that maybe One by Metallica would interest you as the tapping on that song that begins the solo is definitely a good exercise to become good at tapping. I would say to learn it and practice it daily even if you don't learn the rest of the solo. (I haven't learned the rest of the solo.)
#7
Don't forget that tapping can be used very effectively for providing the top note of a legato run (for example, if you're playing frets 10, 12, 14 on some string, then instead of the fretting hand pinky, can use a tap). This generates very fast, very fluid legato runs.

I use this quite a bit, as my 3rd and 4th fingers are weakened on my fretting hand from ulnar nerve damage.

Don't just think about tapping as adding notes much higher up the fret board (which of course it is really good for)
#8
Thing that many people don't tell is that tapping will sound weak, not loud enough and sloppy until you thicken the fingertip skin of the finger you are tapping with. I started doing after 6 years of playing, and I was shocked because of how impossible it felt to pull out compared to everything else i've run onto until then, I had to hit the fret with my whole arm to make it hearable. Now, I don't even have to try.
Just tap. After some time you will think "Jesus, when did i get so good?"
#9
The way I became good at tapping was first I became good at legato playing, then all you have to worry about is synchronizing your tapping hand with your fretting hand and getting comfortable with the patterns you want to execute with your tapping. Remember do it at a slow pace then even slower then what you think slow is. Also i like pulling down with my tapping finger reason being is because pulling down minimizes potential string noise because your index finger should have a natural slight barring over the bottom higher strings. Then f*ck it later on when you get good slap on a string dampening and go friggin crazy tapping arpeggios start skipping strings.