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#81
Quote by Fat Lard
Yeah, I got a 3 out of 5 in calculus in high school so I didn't need to take it in college, but I barely remember anything from it

How to derive basic equations and a little about limits and holes in graphs or something, but completely forgot how to anti-derive


So you didn't have the chops to become a mathematician or a physicist and settled on accounting?

That explains a lot...


“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#82
Well, my first dream job as a kid was to be a cashier at a lego store.

Then I found out that more money = more toys and game boy games, so then I wanted to be an anesthesiologist. Then a CEO once I turned like 12
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#83
Quote by Fat Lard
Well, my first dream job as a kid was to be a cashier at a lego store.

Then I found out that more money = more toys and game boy games, so then I wanted to be an anesthesiologist. Then a CEO once I turned like 12


I can respect that!
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#84
Quote by Arby911
Let's look at the other side of that, why should it be free?

If you want a free education, hit the public library and volunteer in your chosen field as necessary?

Because autodidactism (not being a Rossenrot, just a cool word) and volunteering aren't enough to get you jobs that require degrees. If that were the case, I'd already be a meteorologist.
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#85
Quote by eGraham
Because autodidactism (not being a Rossenrot, just a cool word) and volunteering aren't enough to get you jobs that require degrees. If that were the case, I'd already be a meteorologist.


Is there no way to 'CLEP' a degree, or something similar?
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#86
I don't actually know, I haven't looked into it. I've just accepted my interest as nothing more than that.
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#87
Quote by Arby911
Unless they made you specific promises that were not honored, it seems "caveat emptor" applies?

What was your degree in and was it a 2 year or 4 year degree?

$10k is actually a pretty cheap lesson in life, I've had a few that cost me a good deal more. (But I may just be a slow learner...)
It was an 8 month college for Medical Billing & Coding, so it was much cheaper than your average student loan, yes.

Quote by Xiaoxi
I didn't want to be harsh, but it's true what Arby says. It is 100% your responsibility to find employment or otherwise make money.
Fault isn't what I'm trying to establish here. It's the unfairness of the situation. Maybe if the bill was less, or the job placement assistant (again, personal experience) actually tried to help me out, I'd be alright with it even after having received nothing.
Quote by SGstriker
If KFC is finger-licking good, then people would probably suck dicks for Popeyes. That's how good it is.


There's nothing left here to be saved
Just barreling dogs and barking trains
Another year lost to the blue line
#88
I mean if you paid $10,000 in part for a student service that didn't do what they said they'd do then yeah, that's something to complain about
Quote by Overlord
It's not hard to be nice, but it's nice to be hard
#89
Quote by eGraham
Because autodidactism (not being a Rossenrot, just a cool word) and volunteering aren't enough to get you jobs that require degrees. If that were the case, I'd already be a meteorologist.


More than that, education =/= reading books. As in, having an endless source of books and information about a subject is not sufficient to receive education. The career of being teacher exists and is not just "go read a book about X", it's tough, and to be able to properly teach many subjects, specially something as big as a field is not easy.

Some people can go read books on their own, and they can indeed learn as good as if they had given formal education. However, I think most of that time it means they happened to choose the correct books that explained things correctly by luck (or were recommended them by others), and had the skill to be able to recompile all the information from various different authors and subjects in a coherent manner to be able to understand that field in a deep but simple manner.

But yeah, that is hard. Consider that doing exactly that is basically the whole point of PhD programs. In a PhD you research and learn by yourself and read thousands of books and papers on your own and everything you "learn" is brought from your own initiative. And yet PhD's are hard as fuck (from everything I read about them).
Should we expect every citizen to exercise the same amount of discipline and procedures as PhD students do just because of a worry of college being free or cheap? That's not feasible or fair, at least depending on our expectations (I presume we expect the majority of citizens to be educated and have a relative painless path to higher education)
#90
I'm applying to schools, and trying to avoid ones that have no need-based aid and will require me taking on debt. This limits my pool and lowers my chances, but I just can't imagine taking on loan debt when I'm not about to work in a field that'll pay off any time in the next 10 years.


Although I've thought about getting a teaching degree. It's not like media requires a degree. Bullshit is easy to learn from the outside. I've also thought about not going into college at all.

I guess if you're in a field that rewards you with quick returns, then loans aren't too bad. I'm pretty sure I'm never gonna have any solvency. Especially when full-time roles aren't common (or necessarily desirable for me).
#91
Pretty much I'm taking out about $7,500 a year in debt in order to go to a public college. The current student loan system in America is broke to be honest. I'm attending the University of Missouri which is a "public" college by way and yet they still require me to pay in thousands up front just to study.
#92
I am very happy I decided to take college credits in high school starting in Jr. Year. I did half time Jr. Year at 16 and full time Sr year at 17. We had an option for super subsidized community college in high school called running start.

Then when I went to Washington State University, am in state school, I came in as a sophomore and a half. I got to skip all the BS "general education" requirements and jump right into 300 and 400 level classes at 18.

So I only ended up paying for 5 semesters of college to graduate. I had a small scholarship for writing a philosophy essay, and borrowed a lot out of a Roth IRA, and my savings account. I worked all summer to pay for my cheap rent. I drank cheap beer and ate cheap protein like tuna, eghs, milk, whey, and carbs like brown rice.


Somehow I managed to only come out with 10k of debt and graduating at 20. I stuck around doing research at 21, paid it all off at 23 after deciding I hated research and began a career in sales.


If there are any high school kids reading this, and your state offers subsidized college or AP courses, take all you can. People and teachers in community college are way better than high schoolers anyway.
58-32 NFL Thread Pick Em.
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