#1
I am going to be connecting a Line6 HD500x modeler to a pair of active monitor speakers using a 1/4" TS cable. You can spend not all that much or a whole bunch on a 15' length cable. For this application does it really matter much? If it does I would assume that the issue would be better shielding and less noise.

Thanks.

dave
#2
I think for your use, any cable will do just fine.

I don't pit stock into the thought that a more expensive cable sounds better. I think the price reflects build quality and lasting power more than anything. I use all Yorkville cables here both in studio and on stage, and have never had a bad sound. Yorkville makes budget equipment here in Canada. So a Behringer, but with actual care and thought into their gear and the gear doesn't sound like complete crap. Most of it is very usable and well built.
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Last edited by the chemist at Jul 28, 2016,
#3
I think the question is about using balanced vs unbalanced cable.

As a general rule, the greatest difference in these cables is when you are using longer cable runs. For these, you're probably looking at 6-ft cables or less. I wouldn't worry about it.

Also worth considering is the notion that, "When you're worried that the cables you use are the weak link in your chain, then you've arrived." Haha.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
I think it is worth it to buy quality cables so you buy once. Cheap-cheap stuff will eventually/easily break or short on you. The actual cable materials and plugs have less to do with what I look for, although that is important when you look into Hi-Fi solutions.

The main things to look for in instrument 1/4 cables:

- Shielding. The -/ground signal is wrapped around the + signal. This helps to prevent EMI from leaking into the signal. Generally if the cable says "instrument" cable it will be shielded like this, if it says "speaker" cable it is not shielded.
- BRAIDED Shielding. Non-Braided shielding (Spiral) can end up twisting and turning, revealing sizeable portions of the + signal wire housing. Braided shielding is braided as it suggest, and is much harder to separate.
- Strain Relief. This is usually some shrink wrap that is shrunk around the internal contact points of the cable and the plug, and extends outside the plug housing. This helps prevent the soldered wire from breaking off of the plug contacts. Other forms are spring and rubber sleeves.
- Soldered. I think for pedalboard patch pables, solderless is okay, since they are not being moved around that much. But for cable lines that are constantly moved, taken up, rolled up, etc., soldered is the way to go.

Now the persnickety stuff:

- Capacitance. From what I understand, the lower the better. Generally you will not have readings on a fully assembled cable, but rather the wire itself. There are a lot listed here.
- Plugs. From what I understand, from best to worst of the 3 "biggest" plug names are G&H, Switchcraft, and Neutrik. If I was being persnickety, I would not get any cable/plug that did not have one of those names on it (and really I prefer Switchcraft). Neutrik has more unconventional models of plugs as well. And of course get the kind of plug (orientation, size, model, etc) you need.
---

Really, the FUN bit is making your own cables- soldering, strain-reliefing and all! I recommend CA-0446 with Switchcraft 285L/226. It is thick cable though so I do not recommend for tight angles.
Last edited by Will Lane at Jul 29, 2016,
#6
Quote by Will Lane
I think it is worth it to buy quality cables so you buy once. Cheap-cheap stuff will eventually/easily break or short on you.


Agreed. Except that there is a limit. Some of those cables are ridiculous amounts of money, only because they can be.


Quote by Will Lane
Really, the FUN bit is making your own cables- soldering, strain-reliefing and all....


*shudders*. Hahaha

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by axemanchris
Agreed. Except that there is a limit. Some of those cables are ridiculous amounts of money, only because they can be.

*shudders*. Hahaha

CT
Agreed as well. It is important to discern where snake oil lies, and how much the signal difference is in comparison to the price. For instance, this silly mess.

Also, making cables is oddly therapeutic. It is like knitting for men. Also it does save you money and gives you satisfaction. For instance, this is solid cable (and what I currently recommend if you want premade). Not cheap-cheap, but not silly expensive either. BUT, you can make an equivalent to it for a lot cheaper, getting braided CA-0446 (larger version of CA-0678) and Neutrik ends.
#8
I've had to make a few of my own cables. Not because what I needed didn't exist, or because I had some wacky spec that I couldn't readily find... but because I scored a box full of junk cables and connectors for free and had more need for cables than I had money. Haha.

It's actually not all that much of a pain in the @ss. I soldered a bass once and a friend of mine looked at it and said, "It looks like it was soldered by a blind man."

Practice makes perfect, though. My last couple attempts have worked the first time out of the gate. It's just the kind of thing I just don't enjoy.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by Will Lane
I think it is worth it to buy quality cables so you buy once. Cheap-cheap stuff will eventually/easily break or short on you. The actual cable materials and plugs have less to do with what I look for, although that is important when you look into Hi-Fi solutions.

The main things to look for in instrument 1/4 cables:

- Shielding. The -/ground signal is wrapped around the + signal. This helps to prevent EMI from leaking into the signal. Generally if the cable says "instrument" cable it will be shielded like this, if it says "speaker" cable it is not shielded.
- BRAIDED Shielding. Non-Braided shielding (Spiral) can end up twisting and turning, revealing sizeable portions of the + signal wire housing. Braided shielding is braided as it suggest, and is much harder to separate.
- Strain Relief. This is usually some shrink wrap that is shrunk around the internal contact points of the cable and the plug, and extends outside the plug housing. This helps prevent the soldered wire from breaking off of the plug contacts. Other forms are spring and rubber sleeves.
- Soldered. I think for pedalboard patch pables, solderless is okay, since they are not being moved around that much. But for cable lines that are constantly moved, taken up, rolled up, etc., soldered is the way to go.

Now the persnickety stuff:

- Capacitance. From what I understand, the lower the better. Generally you will not have readings on a fully assembled cable, but rather the wire itself. There are a lot listed here.
- Plugs. From what I understand, from best to worst of the 3 "biggest" plug names are G&H, Switchcraft, and Neutrik. If I was being persnickety, I would not get any cable/plug that did not have one of those names on it (and really I prefer Switchcraft). Neutrik has more unconventional models of plugs as well. And of course get the kind of plug (orientation, size, model, etc) you need.
---

Really, the FUN bit is making your own cables- soldering, strain-reliefing and all! I recommend CA-0446 with Switchcraft 285L/226. It is thick cable though so I do not recommend for tight angles.



All of this is accurate.


Though it is worth noting that you need to focus on durability more than anything else. It's why I buy ProCo rather than Mogami. The price difference is substantial and the ProCos are more durable.
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