#1
I always take my guitar into a different shop on a monthly basis about my guitar strings buzzing. I used to tune my guitar to different turnings and when i went back to standard E i realized it would buzz on the first frets. Now i just got my guitar back from two weeks ago getting the buzzing fixed and told myself i wouldn't change the tuning, i have stayed in standard E although after a few days of playing my guitar it is buzzing again on the first 7 frets of all strings but it's a lot worse on the first 3 frets and the regular A chord just sounds more like a buzz then a chord.

I don't want people to tell me to send it to a professional or have someone look at it again, it's a waste of time and i'll start learning what to do through YouTube videos or something or even if i let a guitar shop person show me, but first i'd like to know what the problem is so i can always fix it myself. I realize it could be a number of things but for a guitar this new and that cost this much i shouldn't be having any problems, so please let me know which problem it's closest to e.g trust rod, nuts, frets or whatever
#2
Quote by Leighton27
for a guitar this new and that cost this much i shouldn't be having any problems


well that's gibson for you

now that the obligatory gibson bashing is out of the way that seems like an interesting problem you're having. immediatly when you mention buzz near the nut i would look at either the nut or the fret levelling.

in order of what i would do to resolve the issue:

first i would give the truss rod a turn (from what you're describing i would go righty tighty), let it sit for a minute and see if things get better or worse (if worse reverse the action)

if a little playing with the truss rod doesn't clear things up i would investigate the nut, make sure the nut is filed appropriately for the strings you're using and the slots aren't cut too deep. youtube "guitar nut cutting" or "guitar nut filing" for a better explanation

finally a levelling and crowning probably isn't included in the standard setup at most shops so it may help you out, there are a hand full of good tuts on youtube for it if you search "guitar fret level and crown" however it definitely seems unlikely even for gibson to put out a new guitar with janky frets. this usually is only necessary on old worn out guitars that have seen years of play or occassionally on cheap chinese makes that were thrown together sloppily at best.
#3
cqwood223
Thank you so much for your quick, detailed reply. I'll look at les paul trust rods on youtube and on a side note i just realized a capo at the third fret stops the buzz if that helps process of elimination .
#4
It makes the nut slots seem a little more suspicious, however a truss rod adjustment is still something i think you should look at since that would be something that every shop would do when you take it in for a service, if they were to replace the nut you'd probably know because they would likely charge you extra for it.

furthermore truss rod adjustments at the shop can actually be a waste if the environment the guitar is stored is different from that of the shop the adjustments are made. in a prior residence my guitars were stored in a basement with no air during the summer and room temps dropping into the 40s (fahrenheit) in the winter and between seasons adjustments were definitely needed.

probably should have mentioned above that truss rod adjustments are also probably going to make it necessary to make some changes to the intonation on your bridge.
#5
Quote by cqwood223


first i would give the truss rod a turn (from what you're describing i would go righty tighty), let it sit for a minute and see if things get better or worse (if worse reverse the action)

if a little playing with the truss rod doesn't clear things up i would investigate the nut, make sure the nut is filed appropriately for the strings you're using and the slots aren't cut too deep. youtube "guitar nut cutting" or "guitar nut filing" for a better explanation

finally a levelling and crowning probably isn't included in the standard setup at most shops so it may help you out, there are a hand full of good tuts on youtube for it if you search "guitar fret level and crown" however it definitely seems unlikely even for gibson to put out a new guitar with janky frets. this usually is only necessary on old worn out guitars that have seen years of play or occassionally on cheap chinese makes that were thrown together sloppily at best.


Yanking the truss rod one way or the other is the last thing I'd do.

First I'd determine if the nut is cut properly (it's probably cut a bit low). If a capo at the third fret solves your problem, I'd guess you have a nut issue. Not a biggie, but back to the shop if that's the case.

Second, I'd use a couple of good straight-edges to determine if the frets are level. One would be an 18" stainless straight edge, the other would be a "fret rocker."

Truss rod adjustments are designed to provide tiny amounts of relief only after the rest of the guitar is in perfect rig.

Alternate tunings can often add or release tension on the neck of your guitar, causing it to bow forward or backward. At some point in all this flopping around, you'll find the neck is out of rig. If you're working with relatively low action and a shorter scale instrument, it can cause issues. I'd recommend getting a book from Amazon called "How to make your electric guitar play great" by Dan Erlewine. It'll tell you how to make adjustments to your guitar, and in what order. About $20, give or take, but the best accessory money you'll spend on your guitar.

There's just one guitar that will allow you to do all the alternate tunings that you like without ever changing the tension on the guitar, and that's a Variax by Line 6. It uses pitch replacement technology within the guitar itself to produce those alternate tunings.

And finally, Gibson is just as guilty of putting out guitars with "janky frets" as any other. In fact, the "Gibson Hump" is an area famously present on some Les Pauls (and similar guitars) where the neck meets the body where the fretboard does a bit of a "ski jump." Gibson's fretwork was so bad at one point that they bought a couple of PLEK machines in an attempt to ride the coattails of the PLEK's reputation for precision and accuracy. They don't use these machines correctly, so it never made much difference. My experience with both high end ($4K and up) Gibsons and the Agiles (Korean) that I have suggest that the fretwork is at least comparable and may, in fact, be slightly better on the less expensive guitars. In any case, it's not only old and worn guitars that need fret leveling. I've had to correct both on a PLEK machine in San Francisco *and* superglue the frets in order to get them into prime playing condition.
Last edited by dspellman at Jul 29, 2016,
#6
cqwood223 Thank you so much! This morning i had the day off, so i thought i might mess around with the guitar and i didn't suspect anythings wrong with the nut because when i get my guitar from the shop it always works fine for a while. So i looked at youtube on how to move the truss rod. I turned it anti-clockwise which loosened it just to see how it would feel and if i had any troubles i thought maybe moving it clockwise might break my guitar if it's too tight. So i turned 1/8 and noticed the strings sounded a lot clearer, i couldn't believe it. It's already at the quality a shop owner would give it to me, so i thought i better leave it for a bit and re-tune again, i tried another 1/8 and NO BUZZ! You saved me so much time and money i have to travel to other towns because we don't have a guitar shop here. Thanks again!
Last edited by Leighton27 at Aug 3, 2016,