#1
Hi all,

I recently purchased a used Vox AC30c2x Combo, i am loving it. It has two Chinese built celestion blue speakers in it and two separate channels one normal and one boost with two guitar jacks for each channel. You can link the channels with a guitar lead or patching cable.

My question is this and it probably will relate to most similar size and style amps.
I want to know if both speakers are running full time or if they are split to the two separate channels? It might sound like a silly question and i'm sure some people will say "just put your ear to the speakers and see if both are running", but it is really hard to tell without turning the amp up to 11 and as much as i like my ears bleeding from time to time its not alot of fun.

I have purchased some Shure sm57 mics to play around with recording the new amp and most tutorials about micing amps show poeple setting up two mics only on one speaker. Is that because only one speaker is running when they have the guitar connected to one channel or the other? Or is it that you don't need to record both speakers because they are both creating the same sound?

I hope this makes sense.

Cheers.
#2
Both speakers are wired together straight off the power amp. Your channels are on the preamp side of the power amp, they aren't related to each other.
When miking in a studio you use multiple mikes to capture different sounds that occur at different locations from the speaker. Both speakers are running at all times. Live, you normally just run one mic close to a speaker. That's all you need.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#3
Cathbard

Cheers, so you could obviously mic both speakers in a studio to blend two tracks and get a different sound or effect if you were going to get technical as you can be more controlled in a studio, but live its not so important and you can just put a mic generally in front of both speakers to capture the overall sound so the audio tech can mix levels etc?
#4
It's got nothing to do with capturing both speakers. Close miking is different to far miking and everything in between. In a studio you may also want to use two different mikes. Last time I was in a studio they used a Neuman U87 and an RCA ribbon mike - on the same speaker from different distances.
Live you don't need such complexity, it just has to get to the PA good enough to be heard. Concerts aren't hifi. Anytime you see two mikes in a live setting, it's because the guitarist is using different speakers - and even then it's being a bit pedantic.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#5
Quote by gee.dunkin
Cathbard

Cheers, so you could obviously mic both speakers in a studio to blend two tracks and get a different sound or effect if you were going to get technical as you can be more controlled in a studio, but live its not so important and you can just put a mic generally in front of both speakers to capture the overall sound so the audio tech can mix levels etc?


Close miking usually mikes a specific area of just one speaker, no matter how many are in your cabinet. Some guitarists or producers are specific about where a particular speaker should be miked, and they'll market the spot with a bit of tape or even a hole in the grill cloth so that they get the mike back in the same spot again. The upshot of that is that close-miking will often NOT sound, through the PA, like what the cabinet sounds to you in a room. Some recording folks will also set up a second (or even a third) mike in the room at a different distance from the cabinet to capture a bit more of the cabinet sounds themselves or even of the bounce off the walls/floor in the room, and they'll blend the two.

If you're playing live, your sound guy will usually just place one mike right next to one speaker.
Last edited by dspellman at Jul 31, 2016,