#2
Aren't these active preamps? Active preamps don't generally use a ground. At least in electric guitars.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#3
You didn't state what kind of pickup it is, and whether you are using steel or bronze strings.

Many acoustic-electrics with bronze strings use a piezoelectric (mechanical microphone) rather than a magnetic pickup. They generate a voltage output from the mechanical vibration felt at the bridge.
Others actually use a microphone-type pickup that "hears" the sound of the string vibration - like your ears do.

You need strings that are able to be "magnetized" to use a magnetic pickup. The steel core modulates the magnetic field when the string vibrates, and the pickup coil "amplifies" that into a voltage.

At any rate, acoustic guitars (with rare exceptions) do NOT have a metal bridge, so there is no place to "ground" them.
#5
I have a feeling that's going to be noisy as hell. That's a passive pickup. It needs a ground. i could be wrong, though.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#7
Quote by mickrathe
This may sound dumb, but i don't know so that's why i'm asking!

I've just bought one of those simple all in one pickup systems for my acoustic, a single coil connected to volume and tone pots, connected to a jack. Easy to install. But my question is why is there no earth/ground wire? If i put this onto an electric, i would have to ground it wouldn't i with the black wire from the back of the bridge? So why do this not have one, and does it need one? (if so, surely they would include it).
What exactly do you think there is to ground on an all wood instrument anyway? The bridge is made of wood also. Wood is non-conductive. End of story.

Quote by dkcol
You didn't state what kind of pickup it is, and whether you are using steel or bronze strings.
Only the windings of acoustic guitar strings are the non magnetic bronze or "brass". The cores and the plain strings ARE steel. And in case you were wondering, you can use magnetic pickups with them.

Quote by dkcol
Many acoustic-electrics with bronze strings use a piezoelectric (mechanical microphone) rather than a magnetic pickup. They generate a voltage output from the mechanical vibration felt at the bridge.
Right, a piezo doesn't have "coils", and thus acts less like an "antenna" than wound bobbin coil pickups.

You need strings that are able to be "magnetized" to use a magnetic pickup. The steel core modulates the magnetic field when the string vibrates, and the pickup coil "amplifies" that into a voltage.[/QUOTE} I answered this already, above.

Quote by dkcol
At any rate, acoustic guitars (with rare exceptions) do NOT have a metal bridge, so there is no place to "ground" them.


A couple of points you've managed to miss altogether. When you "ground" an electric guitar, oftentimes, the finishing touch is covering the control cavity with copper tape or metallic paint, which is them connected to the output ground. In the case of of an active preamp, many are already in "shielded cases. Thus, the "control cavity, is already grounded.

The biggest culprit for hum induction is the pickups windings themselves. As it happens, magnetic pickups for acoustic are available in either single coils, (which induct hum), and humbucking varieties which don't, at least as much

And here boyz and girlz we have a "humbucker" for acoustic: http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/SA3XLNat?adpos=1o3&creative=55397627521&device=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclid=CjwKEAjwrIa9BRD5_dvqqazMrFESJACdv27GgNZiRMUUB8CHZEj_T-xBgmEmc6zDaVc9Ag94NX0P-xoCaFfw_wcB

Quote by mickrathe
Well what i've found is that when you pluck a string upwards, it's louder than an downstroke! whay on earth is that??
I have this odd feeling that if I try to answer a question this frivolous, the next thing you're going to ask is, "why is there air". Accordingly, I pass, and we'll let someone else field this one.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 3, 2016,
#8
Try it and see. You can ground them like an electric putting an earthed strip like the Stewmac Plate Mate under the bridge pin holes if necessary.

Just looking at the pic, the two plain strings might sound too hot with those full-sized pickup poles. If they do, you could try electric strings to get a more balanced output.
Last edited by Tony Done at Aug 3, 2016,
#9
Quote by Tony Done
Try it and see. You can ground them like an electric putting an earthed strip like the Stewmac Plate Mate under the bridge pin holes if necessary.

Just looking at the pic, the two plain strings might sound too hot with those full-sized pickup poles. If they do, you could try electric strings to get a more balanced output.
Wait. I think I had this issue with one of my hybrid 12 strings. You push the slider all the way toward the piezo and away from the single coil and the hum goes right away. Either that or plug the other one with the humbucker in...
#10
Captaincranky

Is the hum a rf "white noise" sizzle or a low frequency mains type?

I've made soundhole pickups from strat SCs, and I shield them by putting aluminium or copper foil under the pickup cover, grounded to the pickup earth wire. It reduces the treble response a tiny bit, but it is pretty good at stopping rf noise.
#11
Tony Done Both!. The pickup is a Kent Armstrong "lipstick", and it's shoehorned into the guitar to the point where the heads of the attachment bolts are on the back of the guitar. If it wouldn't leave hole, I'd take it off and throw it away. The trouble with the design is, they just slapped 12 strings over top of a 6 string design.Although, that's pretty much what everybody else does with electric 12's too. I was sort of jus' messing with you, as I really never use the mag pickup, the Piezo sounds too damned good, to damned natural, and too damned noiseless and clean. Plus, the bodies of these thing are carved out of a single block of "Devil Tree", and they simply sustain "forever". (Yeah, that's a bit of a boast). Read, "a long time".

It does have a "phase switch", which if you balance the pickups in the center, it'll give you out of phase "quack". (Like you need that with a piezo 12 string.

In any case, I both EQ and string funny, as I use acoustic strings on the guitar, and never bother with the front pickup anyway..Here's a pic:



And here's its page at Crafter Europe: http://craftereurope.com/prodinfo9771045/

They come with what Crafter calls, "Korean 12 strings". I have an E/A dread by Crafter which had "Korean 12 strings on it when I got it. It's really no wonder the Koreans try to get those things out of their country ASAP. Their guitars sound unbelievably bad with their home grown strings.If you can picture, "shit hit with a hammer, with a lot of twang", you'll catch my drift...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 4, 2016,