#1
This idea came to me while reading Miss Kristen's hurdy gurdy thread, but I didn't want to hijack it. - Performances that showcase the capabilities of instruments that we don't hear very often in western mainstream music. Here are a couple of my favourites:



That is just one example of his playing.

Last edited by Tony Done at Aug 3, 2016,
#4
Quote by mattedbird
Norwegian Wood by the Beatles was the first released western pop song featuring sitar

shoulda been the last




#6
I play loads of Arabic makam music on banjo, guitar, and steel. It's a bit tricky to get it to sound "authentic" since you have 12 tone equal temperament and so you have to do microtonal bends to make many makams work on a fretted instrument, but pedal steel is ideal for 24 tone just intonated music.

I think a lot of folk instruments are very versatile but tend to be limited to their traditional role and tended to be treated as a novelty outside of that setting (ie banjo outside of bluegrass, country, folk etc) despite having potential to play a lot of different things.

The pedal steel is literally the single most musically versatile instrument because it is fully polyphonic, continuous pitch, capable of bending chords, capable of using just intonation while still sounding optimal in every key, and electric with full control over all those elements in real time and the full timbral flexibility of a string instrument. No other instrument can come close to fitting all of those things other than those fancy continouos pitch keyboards such as the Continuum and Seaboard.

But the pedal steel is limited mostly to traditional country sounds as well as a bit of western swing, jazz, and occasionally Hawaiian (although Hawaiian is traditionally done with non-pedal steel).

b0b Quasar is a cool guy that does a lot of interesting proggy stuff with steel, but I am not quite familiar enough with his material to point to anything specific.

Graham Wiggins is an interesting guy to check out. He plays didjeridu in a rock/electronic/weird band called Dr Didg. It's one of the best examples of didj being used outside of traditional context.

Otherwise everybody shreds on everything outside of western pop music and rock music, aka the only genres where technical ability is frowned on.



Quote by MinterMan22
shoulda been the last


shouldn't have even happened at all
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Aug 4, 2016,
#7
Does Levin on Chapman Stick count?

Dance in the moonlight my old friend twilight


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#9
Definitely sounds like Les uses one of those in the updated South Park theme.
Dance in the moonlight my old friend twilight


Quote by metal4eva_22
What's this about ****ing corpses? My UG senses were tingling.
#10
Quote by Nero Galon
Definitely sounds like Les uses one of those in the updated South Park theme.

Yeah I'm pretty sure he did.
#11
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#12
Idk why but the thread title gave me the impression that guitar virtuosos would be performing while standing on exotic instruments.

. . . ;|
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#14
theogonia777

I've often wondered, since I play lap steel (after a fashion!), about pedal steel, but I've never found a way of working it into my genres - folk and country blues. The closest I can find is the jazzy sound of Randolph's sacred steel, and I've filed that in the "too hard" basket.

The ones that really impress me are those who get a lot out of a little, like the balalaika and baglama examples, and some CBG stuff like Seasick Steve.
#17
I think the Irish call it the fucks chase? All in all this thread has a thumbs up from me?
#18
okay what just happened
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.