#1


I've made this video demonstrating 16 tunings and was thinking of putting it up as a lesson on UG, but someone on UG advised me that it wasn't much of a lesson on it's own, so maybe I should be put some text into a lesson, such as major and minor shapes in each tuning.

Firstly is there a simple way to work out the major and minor shapes? I read some stuff but it never seems to come easily. Also, will it be possible to create a easily fingered (giggity) chord shape in all of these tunings?

Thanks
#2
No offense, but are you sure you're fit to write a lesson on the subject if you need to ask us for advice? Just a thought.

Do you know basic theory? The shapes are really easy to derive when you know your intervals and basic scale/chord construction. But you do need to study some theory.

As for the chord shapes in different tunings, it depends on what kind of chords you want to play. Full 6 string chords? That might be difficult. But 3-4 string voicings could work. I don't really have the patience to analyze every tuning in your video, but it should be possible to play at least some sort of a voicing in any tuning. Barre chords, not really.
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Last edited by Kevätuhri at Aug 5, 2016,
#3
Yeh I was gonna say that but didn't want to be too self-deprecating. I don't see why I can't learn some simple theory then put it as an add on. It's gonna be a beginner type lesson tbh. I was wondering if there was a simple way to find major/minor chords? I'm sure I will get more into it once I learn a bit of basic theory
#4
1) Learn intervals.
1a) Learn notes.
1b) Learn what intervals are in chords.
2) Find the relevant notes on the fingerboard.

We don't want to spoon-feed you because all your questions will have answers based on the above, and also notes are on a mod-12 system (they repeat every 12 notes when correcting for octave).

Seriously. Learn notes and intervals, and you will get much further than if you continue asking the same questions over and over again.
#5
NeoMvsEu There always seems to be some ambiguity when naming a chord whenever I've tried to do it and whenever I think I've cracked it, someone will go "nah that's an Eminmaj7dim24th. This is what I understand so far about naming chords - say I have a chord which is made up only A, C# and E notes, would that always be an A major chord? And if I had A, E and C notes would that always be an A minor chord?
#6
dim24th lol, the numbers don't go past 13 because 14 is equivalent to a seventh and 15 is an octave.

Yes! A-C#-E is A major in any arrangement. A-C-E is A minor in any arrangement. E-C-A, C-E-A, E-A-C, all A minor, just different voicings.
#7
Quote by NeoMvsEu
dim24th lol, the numbers don't go past 13 because 14 is equivalent to a seventh and 15 is an octave.

Yes! A-C#-E is A major in any arrangement. A-C-E is A minor in any arrangement. E-C-A, C-E-A, E-A-C, all A minor, just different voicings.


Ah that's good then. So I can now work out a major and minor chord in any tuning, just by making sure I have the right 3 notes for whatever chord note and type I want? Kind of like DNA? I guess it becomes harder when there are extra notes added? For a maj7th chord you use the same notes from a major but add the note 7 whole tones above the root note aswell? That's the main bit I don't get I think. Do you not factor in sharps and flats? e.g. C to E is a third? (C,D,E?) then a fifth is G (C,D,E,F,G) then the seventh is B? (C,D,E,F,G,A,B)
Why is a third not C,D,D#?
#8
Whole tones, no.

Major 7 could be:
One half step down from tonic, adjusted for octave
11 half steps above.

Thirds are two letters away from each other by definition, regardless of major/minor/etc.
#9
Quote by cactus-dude
Also, will it be possible to create a easily fingered (giggity) chord shape in all of these tunings?


yeah, you'll fit right in with the other lessons people
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#11
Quote by Kevätuhri
No offense, but are you sure you're fit to write a lesson on the subject if you need to ask us for advice?
The blind can lead the blind if the first blind person has a stick....
#12
Quote by jongtr
The blind can lead the blind if the first blind person has a stick....


Yeah except when you need to read signposts for directions
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#13
Quote by Kevätuhri
Yeah except when you need to read signposts for directions
Damn, you had to come along and spoil the party...
#14
If you read the lesson about guitar shapes, and then realise that instead of 4 or 5 semitones apart between string pairs, you use whatever numbers exist in your tunings, then you can work out the shapes for yourselves.

For example, if each string was tuned 7 semitones apart, then the vertical line across any string pair (parallel to frets) makes up 7 semitones.

See https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/a_deep_look_at_guitar_shapes.html

A major triad consists of some start pitch, and another 4 semitones above it, and another one 7 semitones above that start pitch. (can use other octaves also). A minor triad consists of some start pitch, and another 3 semitones above it, and another one 7 semitones above that start pitch.

A major 7 chord takes a major triad and adds another pitch at 11 semitones above the start.
A minor 7 chords takes a minor triad and adds another pitch at 10 semitones above the start.

Good luck.

(p.s I have software, emuso, that will do all this for you, but it's not quite ready for beta-release yet. It's what I used to make all the diagrams in most of the lessons I've done for UG)
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Aug 6, 2016,
#15
Quote by jerrykramskoy
If you read the lesson about guitar shapes, and then realise that instead of 4 or 5 semitones apart between string pairs, you use whatever numbers exist in your tunings, then you can work out the shapes for yourselves.

For example, if each string was tuned 7 semitones apart, then the vertical line across any string pair (parallel to frets) makes up 7 semitones.

See https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/a_deep_look_at_guitar_shapes.html

A major triad consists of some start pitch, and another 4 semitones above it, and another one 7 semitones above that start pitch. (can use other octaves also). A minor triad consists of some start pitch, and another 3 semitones above it, and another one 7 semitones above that start pitch.

A major 7 chord takes a major triad and adds another pitch at 11 semitones above the start.
A minor 7 chords takes a minor triad and adds another pitch at 10 semitones above the start.

Good luck.

(p.s I have software, emuso, that will do all this for you, but it's not quite ready for beta-release yet. It's what I used to make all the diagrams in most of the lessons I've done for UG)


So to make a D major chord I just need the three notes D, F#, A, then to make a Dmaj7 I would add a C#? or a C for Dm7?
#16
Dm7 is first a minor chord and then a chord with a minor 7.
D7 is the major chord with minor 7.