#1
i never been in a band with only a single guitarist.

loopers/backing tracks are out of the realm of possibility.

so if you were a guitarist in a three piece blues/bluesrock band (i don't sing the bassist does), do you have any advise? i have always split lead and rhythm with a second guitarist.
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#2
I don't see what the problem is. Play rhythm with the occasional lead fill at gaps in the vocals between lines and when you play solos there just won't be rhythm guitar. That has worked for like hundreds of bands.
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#3
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I don't see what the problem is. Play rhythm with the occasional lead fill at gaps in the vocals between lines and when you play solos there just won't be rhythm guitar. That has worked for like hundreds of bands.


I understand that, what I want to know is how to keep it more full throughout. it's not a problem of playing the lead without someone underneath me.

are there any interesting chords that make it more full by not just playing a single line. I use 3rds to fill up some spots, etc.
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alright "king of the guitar forum"


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nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


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youre just being a jerk man.



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---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#4
Learn the notes in a chord and where the notes fall on the fingerboard. Experiment with different positions and combinations. Consider moving between different positions.

Afterwards, if you're still not satisfied, learn about chord extensions and follow the same process.
#5
Listen to some bands that have that setup, and transcribe their ideas. Cream era Eric Clapton. John Mayer trio.
#6
I have been in two trios that worked often back in 80's. One thing I learned is that the better the drums and bass played together, the easier it is to me melodic. If you play with a drummer who is always rolling and changing rhythms and a bass player who wants to play "lead bass" you will be extremely limited in what you can do to present a full sound. You'll end up playing a lot of abbreviated chords (mostly on the E-A-B strings) and playing very tightly regimented rhythms to compensate for your fellow musicians lack of bottom and "groove". It's great when you find the right combination. I wouldn't suggest listening to Cream (one of my all time favorites) because a lot of what they did was just a "jam" that started with a verse or two of a song then became a two three minute jam.
Listen to The Police. Even when they are doing odd rhythms the bass and drums are tight and in sync. It's allowed Andy Summers to play big beautiful chords and unusual inversions using all six strings. John Mayer Trio (I agree) The Winery Dogs, ZZ Top, SRV (original trio), Led Zep, all really tight bands. I recently saw a YouTube interview with Joe Walsh who talked about a James Gang reunion a few years ago. He said there is nothing better in rock n' roll that a tight trio on a good night when it's working well and there nothing more horrible than a trio on a night when they aren't tight. I agree.

One last thing I learned; massive volume will not compensate for poor playing in a trio, in fact it makes it much worse. If it doesn't sound good at a moderate volume no amount of extra distortion or volume will help.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Aug 5, 2016,
#7
I play in a blues/blues rock trio and in a two guitar proggish band. Some advice:

1) fill space - In a trio I find it's important to really fill the space as much as possible ( there are of course exceptions to this) - i think jimi hendrix is the best case study for a good rhythm approach - he fills the space with chords and fills without ever letting the riffs fall apart. He plays in the lower and upper registers fluidly. In practice I find using chord voicings that play the root with your thumb and then the upper 4 strings provides the best results most of the time in a trio -on the A string that would mean playing the root on the A string and then the three upper strings. If you aren't playing low register notes in a trio it can sound pretty empty, the lower register is really important. Sometimes it can even be interesting to double up the bass riff on guitar and add r&b style chord stabs in between.

2) solos - it's all about the ending- in a trio you have to be incredibly tight with solo endings- you have to be able to land perfectly on the next chord or punch or part when the solo ends because you're the rythm player as well.

3) capo can be your friend - i don't use a capo, but it can help fill space a lot if you're stuck playing a blues in F or some other unfrienfly key - having access to open notes can help fill the void and let notes sustain longer.
Last edited by reverb66 at Aug 5, 2016,
#8
Listen to the classic 3-piece (1-guitar) rock bands. Who, Cream, Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Police, Free, etc.. they all seemed to manage all right . (OK in the studio they often used overdubs, but not live.)
You're lucky the bassist is doing the singing (as in Cream and Police), so you only have guitar to think about.

It will, of course, limit the kind of material you can play, but that can be an advantage. You make the most of what you've got, and that creates your unique style.
Last edited by jongtr at Aug 6, 2016,