#1
Hey guys. Gonna be a pretty depressive topic here. Been feeling lack of inspiration lately and motivation. Music ideas are there but they always stop at "who's gonna care anyways."

Any thoughts on how to battle this?

I'm a long time musician and have done many albums and whatnot. Recent music video didn't get the attention I was expecting and nor did the free to download album so I'm now just feeling like nobody cares about music at all anymore.

What do you guys suggest I do?

PS. if anyone's interested in the music video or the album:


https://vendettav.bandcamp.com/album/pandora-tomorrow
#2
Retire. You've done it all. Wait for your fans to demand a comeback. By then, you'll probably have had some more inspiration. If not, you can just entertain your fans with the greatest hits they know and love.

Very few composer/performers can maintain a long (and successful) career with constant levels of inspiration and fresh ideas. They're so rare we tend to call them geniuses. Maybe you're not one of them.

More seriously ... ... take some time out and listen to some kinds of music you haven't heard before. Open up your horizons. Don't try to write anything, and just spend some time (it could be a year or more) just absorbing more influence. There's a whole world of music out there that you've never heard: some of it will amaze you. (I've been playing for 50 years - I'm still stumbling on great stuff I've never heard before.)
#3
Jongtr, I agree with what you said. That usually works pretty fine. And hey, I've been doing just that for the past few months. Got new ideas, concepts, sounds in my mind. Just thinking, why bother doing it, if nobody's gonna just stop by and be like 'hey, this is cool' at the very least, you know. No idea how to battle that... the feeling of worthelessness
#4
If your music is not getting the attention you want, then there's your motivation right there ... be honest with yourself, and fix it. Sadly noone else will, unless you're backed with a load of money.

Whenever I've had criticism of some form (be that rejection of ideas as well), then when I was younger, that was a major insult, a major blow to the soul. Now, I take it differently. I take it on-board. If I believe the criticism is founded, then I'll address it as best I can ... that improves me. I'm not insulted ... instead, I'm informed, and I enjoy responding. My playing as a result is a lot better. A lot better.

But the same goes in other areas ... I am also a software designer (I've architected very successful products taht have sold in millions), and criticism there always improves things. Again, when I was younger, it sucked. Later, the benefits were obvious.

Here are my comments and suggestions.

I watched the video (which looks really cool), but it was 1:15 before anything really took off musically (which was then good), and the video itself was not offering much stimulation to that point. I'm all for building atmosphere, but I guess it depends who you are targeting your music at. It may be that a lot of kids patience has run out before that point? And hence everything else follows.

If that were me, I'd cut out at least 50 seconds off the front. And I'd be way more adventurous on the solo, as there are no vocals. If the music is to be laid back, then the video itself needs more going on.

But whatever, you've got talent ... don't waste it feeling down. Fix it.

And I wish you all the best.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Aug 6, 2016,
#5
Jon and Jerry gave good advice. But there's one other thing you need to realize as well: no one gives a rat's ass about recorded music anymore. Seriously. Your albums will probably never sell or gain attention, just because they're just albums among thousands that get shoved down our throats on a daily basis. If you want to have any kind of a career as a musician, put your attention towards live shows, tours and session work. Recording albums is fun, and there are still a lot of people who do like to listen to full albums, but it's a really poor way to market yourself in the current state of the music business. You will gain more fans and money from a nice live show than from a youtube upload, that is for sure.

And if I were you I would consider some sideman work. You could actually get paid for playing music that way, and you would build contacts, which is infinitely more important than clicks on a website.

All in all, don't get discouraged because your youtube videos don't take off since no one cares. Instead, go out there in person, make friends with other musicians, throw some gigs, make industry contacts etc etc and you might actually find success.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

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*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#6
Quote by Vendetta V
Jongtr, I agree with what you said. That usually works pretty fine. And hey, I've been doing just that for the past few months. Got new ideas, concepts, sounds in my mind. Just thinking, why bother doing it, if nobody's gonna just stop by and be like 'hey, this is cool' at the very least, you know. No idea how to battle that... the feeling of worthelessness
Kevätuhri has the sad news you don't want to hear (and probably none of us do). Basically you have to make people care, somehow. Music fans tend not to be roaming the deserts of youtube in desperate search for cool music they can relate to . They are bombarded with stuff all the time, and it's all they can do to select the coolest stuff from that, and maybe follow links from what they already like.

If you're thinking "why bother", that suggests you don't actually like your own music enough. You have to be really passionate about what you're doing, to feel like you've discovered some amazing new life-changing stuff that people NEED to hear. And then you go out and sell it, tirelessly, because you get too twitchy sitting doing nothing. You play live, any chance you get. And you might go through a few years of people not getting it, maybe even getting laughed or sneered at, before you convince enough fans to get a ball rolling. It's hard, and getting harder all the time!

IOW, the best perspective is to maybe forget about getting your recordings across to anyone who has not actually seen or met you. Put them out there, naturally - on youtube, itunes, or even on CDs (which I think are just about still sellable, at least at gigs) - but treat that as a sideline, as publicity and connections across social media. Performing and composing music seems to be becoming a much smaller scale affair, among groups of friends and acquaintances. And that's great, provided you don't want to make a living out of it. What greater pleasure is there than being able to entertain your best friends (and hopefully their friends)? Who needs anonymous fans, who probably won't get your deeper meanings anyway? Then, if by some bizarre mischance, your itunes tracks suddenly start selling, well that's a bonus.

If you can't find the passion for this, then it comes back to what I first said: quit! The world needs no more guitarists, no more songwriters. There's more than enough out there already. Supply exceeds demand by several orders of magnitude. So you need to believe your music truly is better than (say) 90% of anything out there now. Make that 99% and you may have something... With no self-belief, you certainly won't make anyone else believe.

If you want my own perspective... As I said, I've been playing for 50 years (first live gig, October 1966), always with bands, never solo. Never "made it" (appeared on a self-financed EP back in 1979 that got played in the radio a few times - sold almost nothing). Been writing songs for 50 years too (maybe 200 altogether) - one of the dozens of bands I've played in used a couple of them. Otherwise I'm always playing covers. Never made a CD of my own (helped some others out on their CDs). Mainly because I don't sing well enough! But I've always enjoyed what I do, because I still play live (less and less often, but just enough). For me it's recreation. It's the best fun you can have with your clothes on.
However, even at my advanced age, I do still plan on putting together an album of my own material... but I have no illusions about what I'd be doing it for. I'm not expecting anyone else to care about it (well maybe half a dozen people I know).

You could argue that the internet has returned music to something like what it always used to be, before recording was invented: something you had to experience live. Recording is an artform in its own right, separate from performance (which is as old as humanity), but now with garageband and similar software, just about anyone can make their own music. And just about anyone does. It's a less impressive skill to have. You might say that audio recording has eaten itself, as a valid artform. But performance still impresses and entertains, and is where music achieves its true primal function. That won't die, nor will it change (much). If you can do that, you have something truly valuable.
Last edited by jongtr at Aug 6, 2016,
#7
Actually I knew that already. I've sold many albums (not as many as I'd wish but still) and have managed to get endorsements and live events and everything. It's just that after a year of missing out from the life all together, I came back to doing some music again and there I stand with the people's approach to music totally changed.

It's awful to say the least :P
Anyways, I really appreciate y'all comin in and dropping your two cents!
#8
C'mon mate - 269 views is pretty great for someone that rarely plays live https://m.facebook.com/Vcreep/

Going off your Facebook page I'm surprised you got even that high.

Get out and play, work the local scene and move from there.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9
Youtube is mostly a freak show with "strange and unexpected" getting the viral hits. Rock bands... nada.

Recorded music is at an all time low point in terms of signal to noise ratio with some great music buried deeply under a sea of mediocrity.

Live shows are the only realistic path to create demand for your stuff. Get out and play every song like it was your last. Leave em wanting more.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#10
still at it with the shitty buckethead music, huh?
Quote by Kevätuhri
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You win. I'm done here.
#11
Quote by AlanHB
C'mon mate - 269 views is pretty great for someone that rarely plays live https://m.facebook.com/Vcreep/

Going off your Facebook page I'm surprised you got even that high.

Get out and play, work the local scene and move from there.
You think so? Appreciate it for pointing that out actually. Yeah the thing is, local scene is dead (not in the US atm) and even if you get 100+ people at the show, nobody checks back with you online. Weird nation.

I've come to a point where I earn my money from my video studio. Music is more of a 'I do it purely for passion,' but at the same time, I enjoy playing/writing more than the actual recording process as so many things can go wrong and whatnot. you know the whole deal. So I'm thinking Ima do another recording in a month or two, jsut for the sake of doing it see if that gets any more attention.

Talking of music videos by the way, you guys got any music vid script ideas?


Quote by Cajundaddy
Youtube is mostly a freak show with "strange and unexpected" getting the viral hits. Rock bands... nada.

Recorded music is at an all time low point in terms of signal to noise ratio with some great music buried deeply under a sea of mediocrity.

Live shows are the only realistic path to create demand for your stuff. Get out and play every song like it was your last. Leave em wanting more.
Yeah been there and did that. It was working out pretty well in Europe, not in Armenia (currently that's where i'm situated). It's a shitty hole where pirating is completely legal and even local tv shows rip off the music from Harry Potter or Saw. Nobody wants to pay for the music or even follow up online and whatnot. But I agree, recorded music at the moment is at a very low demand.

Quote by Hail
still at it with the shitty buckethead music, huh?
Still at it with the little penis, huh?
#12
Maybe your music just doesn't appeal to anyone. Why does it matter? You should be writing music that you like and, unless you're getting paid, not really give a shit what people think about it.

Just wondering though. When you said that your video didn't get the attention that you were expecting... what exactly were you expecting?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#13
Quote by Vendetta V
You think so? Appreciate it for pointing that out actually. Yeah the thing is, local scene is dead (not in the US atm) and even if you get 100+ people at the show, nobody checks back with you online. Weird nation.

I've come to a point where I earn my money from my video studio. Music is more of a 'I do it purely for passion,' but at the same time, I enjoy playing/writing more than the actual recording process as so many things can go wrong and whatnot. you know the whole deal. So I'm thinking Ima do another recording in a month or two, jsut for the sake of doing it see if that gets any more attention.


Yes I think the view count is quite high, as your Facebook page would otherwise indicate that you have zero actual fans - the engagement is extremely low for the amount of likes you have.

Otherwise I'm not sure what you're on about with your local scene. If local original bands are drawing 100 people, that means there is a clear demand for original music.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
Quote by theogonia777
Maybe your music just doesn't appeal to anyone. Why does it matter? You should be writing music that you like and, unless you're getting paid, not really give a shit what people think about it.

Just wondering though. When you said that your video didn't get the attention that you were expecting... what exactly were you expecting?
May be it doesn't appeal to anyone, but then why go the extra mile (and all the effort and money) to record it? Right? I mean I could sit in the studio and crank up some jams and feel good. That's my initial problem with recording, cause it's a tedious task and doesn't end up rewarding at all.

What I was expecting is to at least get 50 shares of the video on facebook lol. Not much to ask eh?

Quote by AlanHB
Yes I think the view count is quite high, as your Facebook page would otherwise indicate that you have zero actual fans - the engagement is extremely low for the amount of likes you have.

Otherwise I'm not sure what you're on about with your local scene. If local original bands are drawing 100 people, that means there is a clear demand for original music.


I've noticed that too. Facebook keeps mentiontioning paid ads at every possible chance. I feel like they actually throttle your reach/engagement to get you to pay for that.

As for the scene. I've drawn the same amount, they just don't wanna pay for the music or at least follow up after the show. It's weird.
#15
Quote by Vendetta V
That's my initial problem with recording, cause it's a tedious task and doesn't end up rewarding at all.
So why do it? Unless you enjoy it for its own sake, or in order to improve your playing and writing (by being able to listen back and edit).
Quote by Vendetta V

As for the scene. I've drawn the same amount, they just don't wanna pay for the music or at least follow up after the show. It's weird.
But if you can draw 100+ people, that sounds great to me.

Are they paying? How much do you make? Do you get a positive response and enjoy it? Do you get people coming back each time specially to see you?
All of that should be reason enough to congratulate yourself and continue, and forget about recording - unless your audience starts to ask you if they can buy CDs (or whatever). I'd accept that that's an increasingly unlikely scenario these days - but if the audience likes you (and you get paid) what more can you honestly want?

Or - are those 100+ people just there anyway? To see whoever might be playing, or just to drink and have music in the background? Are you only getting polite applause (if any)? Are you playing for free? (Or are you actually paying for the privilege of playing??)
If any of that is true, that suggests you need to look for a different kind of gig - or maybe you're just playing the wrong kind of music. The answer is still not to expect facebook (or recordings) to work for you. It's still to make the live stuff work in some way.
Last edited by jongtr at Aug 10, 2016,
#16
Quote by jongtr

Are they paying? How much do you make? Do you get a positive response and enjoy it? Do you get people coming back each time specially to see you?
All of that should be reason enough to congratulate yourself and continue, and forget about recording - unless your audience starts to ask you if they can buy CDs (or whatever). I'd accept that that's an increasingly unlikely scenario these days - but if the audience likes you (and you get paid) what more can you honestly want?

Or - are those 100+ people just there anyway? To see whoever might be playing, or just to drink and have music in the background? Are you only getting polite applause (if any)? Are you playing for free? (Or are you actually paying for the privilege of playing??)
If any of that is true, that suggests you need to look for a different kind of gig - or maybe you're just playing the wrong kind of music. The answer is still not to expect facebook (or recordings) to work for you. It's still to make the live stuff work in some way.


Those guys are on every concert. It's a small scene here so mostly you see the same crowd everywhere. I don't do solo concerts, Used to play on shows, and be one of the headliners (yep... small scene I tell you),but it'd pay very very little. In fact all the expenses and risks and wear and tear involved with the gear, I'd end up square at best. I'm considered one of the best guitarists in this country so I do get positive input. It's just that the crowd doesn't wanna pay money for music (something they can pirate) and well venues don't pay much cause they don't make much.

In a nutshell, it's not just me, some of my fellow bands are even worse off cause they have to devide the pathetic income between the members :P Just the damn culture/crowd. You pretty much hit the nail in the head with the part I bolded out in your quote. I stopped playing live recently and have been contemplating making more music. I think I should do a few better music vids as that seems to grab more attention than the music links.

Oh and hey, here's my website which I got back up and running at vendettav.vms-studio.com


Honestly though, two years ago I'd be selling CDs waaaay more often than what it is now, not too many to make a living off of it, but enough to keep you making more. Times have changed for sure!
#17
If you're drawing 100 people every show, charge $10 door. You should come away with around $700 to split between the bands. That's where you'll make the majority of your cash. Second place is by selling physical items at your show - CDs/merch etc - immediately after your set.

As for Facebook advertising, the only effective way is to boost singular posts and target your existing fans. A general page boost to get more likes will just result in a bunch of spambots liking your page.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#18
Quote by AlanHB
If you're drawing 100 people every show, charge $10 door. You should come away with around $700 to split between the bands. That's where you'll make the majority of your cash. Second place is by selling physical items at your show - CDs/merch etc - immediately after your set.

As for Facebook advertising, the only effective way is to boost singular posts and target your existing fans. A general page boost to get more likes will just result in a bunch of spambots liking your page.
Good one about the FB. Tried selling CDs and Merch, Most bands here agree it doesn't work.

Anyways, As I mentioned earlier. I should consider a new music video. Those tend to get more attention. Got a new camera anyways
#19
Works for my band. Also works for the big bands. You'll get the majority of your income from tix and merch. Sell tix and merch.

The recorded material and video clips are just ways to advertise your live shows. You don't actually make money from them.

If you're keen to do another music video, do a physical launch for it. Have a gig where it is shown to the people who come, before uploading it anywhere. Charge money for tix.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#20
I do it for love. I don't do it for other people. I can't really relate so unfortunately can't offer any advice except to ask "do you care?" if the answer is "yes" then you've answered your own question with the only person that really matters anyway. If you answer is "no" then why would anyone else.
Si
#21
I understand it's very frustrating if you do a lot of work and the end result is that only a few appreciate what you have done. Even if you do music for yourself, you hope that someone likes what comes out of your soul.

Remember, every song you make is different and even if none of them strikes commercial success they might mean a lot to at least some.

Perhaps you want to reinvent yourself somehow to spice things up and get exited about making music? Maybe find a new ways to make songs?
Perhaps you want to collaborate with someone or do music for someone else? The possibilities are endless (...which is why I was able to figure out just two things ).

I listened to your song and I liked it. One thing, though, that put me off was when the video showed you playing guitar. I felt like I was watching someone doing a cover song and showing the fingerboard so that people can see them actually playing the song. That took me right off the 'story' and my concentration went from hearing to seeing.

Well, hope you find motivation again and get some success!
#22
Sometimes things translate better live than to "Here's something I'd like to download and listen to during the day". I think this would be one of those cases, where I'd try and do this stuff live and not worry about the digital content unless the fan base seems to want it, and want to pay for it.

Best,

Sean
#23
you should try going out busking and play some live music, that way people actually approach you and you realize your music means something
#24
Quote by Vendetta V
Hey guys. Gonna be a pretty depressive topic here. Been feeling lack of inspiration lately and motivation. Music ideas are there but they always stop at "who's gonna care anyways."

Any thoughts on how to battle this?

I'm a long time musician and have done many albums and whatnot. Recent music video didn't get the attention I was expecting and nor did the free to download album so I'm now just feeling like nobody cares about music at all anymore.

What do you guys suggest I do?

PS. if anyone's interested in the music video or the album:


https://vendettav.bandcamp.com/album/pandora-tomorrow


That happens to me sometimes it's usually just a same day guitar retire thing when I don't get the response I was expecting from people.
It should pass you will get back to do it again because you still like doing it and you still want to get the attention you deserve out of your music.
It's really hard sometimes, I know but it's just the opposite of how you feel when someone really appreciates something you and when that happens again you will be back at it
#25
Thanks for the kind words guys, I mean both the encouragement and the compliments on my music. I really appreciate it.

I recently got approached by a few acquintances and they showed me their music playback history, a lot of my recent tracks and some old but gold ones. Surprisingly this was kind of inspiring. I'm now thinking of doing a set of tracks with a totally different twist this time, a little more jazzy a little more funky.

May be the newish genre twist might interest a new audience. And well since it's different it seems pretty fun to try and tackle it! I know bunch of you actually suggested it and yes it works!
#26
if you're doing this for money or fame you're in it for the wrong reason. You just need to go out there and keep giving the middle finger to the world and kicking ass. Fuck everybody, fuck what anyone says, go demand to be heard. This is rock n roll go fucking kick some ass you whiny fuck.
#27
Sit down and just think about what gave you motivation when you were getting started.

Connect to that original source of inspiration
“Music is a necessity. After food, air, water and warmth, music is the next necessity of life.” - Keith Richards
#29
Quote by Vendetta V
Here's a new music video I should share. Did end up getting some inspiration after all!!!


According to your FB, this is the first thing you have done since the last video. You haven't played a gig, you didn't even organise a launch party for the video.

It's cool that your inspiration is back, but if you think this new new music video will do better than the old one, increasing your popularity, you are incorrect.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#30
AlanHBthanks for the heads up Alan. I know it's not gonna help in the longer run, but that way at least I get a blast from playing and writing the music vs doing a concert where the crowd that comes is not even gonna approach and say hi, let alone pay any entrance fee.