#1
Sorry if this is in the wrong place, I genuinely wasn't sure.

I've been playing guitar for 4 years now. I play left handed and I have, over the last year, hit a massive stagnation in my playing. My form is wrong, my barre chords never ring true and no matter how hard I try (and I have tried, with multiple teachers) to correct it, I simply can't. I taught myself for my first 3 years of playing as I didn't have the money for teachers. At the point I am at I am a good guitarist, the whole shred vibe going on, but I want to be able to do more rhythm and I can't.

So I've been considering the idea of relearning the guitar the other way round, right handed. This would give me the chance to start again and practice with perfect form, now that I actually know what that is. I would still have all the theory, but would need to relearn the actual technique. The thing is, I don't even know if this is possible. I know plenty of left handers who learnt right handed, but i've never met someone who learnt after playing lefty for 4 years.

If anyone knows anything about this, whether its possible, a good idea, past examples, I'd love to hear them.

Thank you.
#2
I have many lefty friends who play right handed.
It's the best choice for u as today everything is built for right handers...there so many nice guitars out there that a lefty can have only through an unaffortablr custom shop !

As for the technic (or how it's writen) if you had this playing style from the beginning u will need to destroy-unlearn everything and rebuild your technic or little by little improving details and details and details until you are ok...
Either the one way or the other it's pretty much the same but if you have the courage do it ! Many advantages will appear .

I hope this helps
#3
My friend is a lefty who plays right handed. We knew a guitarist we jammed with a few years back who played left handed, and well we both had to try it out. Im right handed and was obviously terrible at it. My friend who is left handed, but plays right, tried it out thinking he would maybe have an advantage over me. He didnt, he sounded equally terrible.

Is it possible? Im sure it is. I just think if you put the time into correcting the problem with your technique, as you would to relearn. You would be better off.
Just my two cents.
#4
cjhawkins1984

But thats my problem. I have put over a year into correcting my technique. It has been the primary focus of the last year, but I have made no leeway what so ever.
#5
That's a tough one. On the one hand, it shouldn't take as long to get good again seeing how you already know a lot, you just have to train the hands, but I'm betting it'll still take a while. I've tried playing a left handed guitar before and it was a struggle to even play a basic chord.

I think in general it's best to learn right handed from the start, regardless of if you're right or left handed. Both hands are equally stupid at playing guitar at that point. They don't make left handed pianos, etc.

But, once you've already started playing one way it's basically like starting over again, so I usually wouldn't recommend it, but in a case like you're describing, where the whole point is to force yourself to learn again, but correctly, maybe it's the right choice. Hard to say though.

I do know of famous players that can play both right and left handed though. I believe Micheal Angelo Batio had a V shaped double neck guitar and would sometimes play left and right handed at the same time, and of course there are people that do 2 handed tapping with all of their fingers, so it's not impossible, it'll just take some time for you to get your hands used to the reversed roles.
#6
I switched from left to right after 1 year of playing. It took about 6 months to adjust and I do play differently R than L but maybe that is a good thing. Excellent fretboard control and right hand technique requires more work but I think it is well worth it. It was a good choice for me and now after 40 years of gigging righty, I would never look back.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#7
Quote by The4thHorsemen

I think in general it's best to learn right handed from the start, regardless of if you're right or left handed. Both hands are equally stupid at playing guitar at that point. They don't make left handed pianos, etc.

Piano is a bit different, though, because both of the hands do exactly the same thing and it's all about finger movement. It's like typing on a keyboard (that is pretty much the same with either hand). But on guitar your picking hand movement is more complex than your fretting hand movement. I would compare picking hand movement to using a mouse (or writing with a pen) and fretting hand movement to typing on a keyboard.

For some people playing the guitar right handed just doesn't work. Some people are strongly left handed. But I'm not sure if it even has to do with handedness all the time. I guess It's kind of the same thing as the way you hold the hockey stick/baseball bat/whatever. (I mean, some left handed people have naturally started playing the guitar right handed.)

Also, some time ago people tried to force left handed children to become right handed but that didn't work. Right handed kids had a clear advantage over them.

After Tony Iommi cut his fingers, he tried learning to play the guitar right handed but it just didn't work.

My point is, if you are good at playing the guitar left handed, it doesn't mean you will become good at playing it right handed. I'm sure it's possible but I don't know... It could be just a waste of time.

Would I do it after one year? Sure. You still suck after one year so there isn't much to lose. Would I do it after four years? Probably not. Some time ago a guy who had been playing for 20 years and asked the same question, and in that case it was a clear no.


The best option would be taking some lessons. You don't need to take them regularly - maybe a couple of lessons could fix it.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 8, 2016,
#8
I am a lefty who started out playing righty. I would say do the switch now. The longer you wait the harder it is going to be. After 4 years you are right on the edge of taking that next leap in progress. If you are saying that your technique is off anyway, then now is the perfect time to change. Fingering and barring chords should be easier with your left but strumming and rhythm will be harder with your right.
#9
Buy a righty guitar, keep your lefty ones.

Spend an equal amount of time playing both. While playing right handed you should be trying to relearn how to play as you try to catch up with your left handed playing. While playing left handed focus on getting better.

That way you don't just spend a year just getting your right handed caught up, you continue to get better overall.


Then buy one of these stupid things

#10
I am a lefty who was forced to learn right handed (thank God). You certainly can learn to play right handed. It felt so unnatural to me when I was starting out but you get used to it.
#11
what makes you think you'll be able to get the form down correctly on a right-handed guitar, if you haven't actually got it down on left-handed? it'd probably be faster to just fix your existing technique. use your brain when you experiment with your technique, don't just stubbornly try things and then say it can't be done. learn to be aware of your body and where/how it's being stressed.

if you had a minute to find position to play a clear-ringing barre chord, i'm sure you'd be able to. you just have to figure out what exactly you're doing that makes it work, and get it into your subconscious.

now if you wanted to switch because of other reasons like more guitar choices, that's another thing entirely.
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