#1
ok so ive been working shitty jobs for three years .i work as a cook now getting paid less than 500 euros a month without day offs.im starting to realise that it doesnt lead anywhere and if you want to be good in something and happy you have to put as much time as possible on it.my job is dirty and depressive and it also takes most of my time away so being a cook sucks i guess.my passion is playing my guitar and i want to teach other people how to play as well and get paid for that.https://www.youtube.com/user/1349Blackdeath1349 this is me playing would you trust me as a guitar instructor just by these clips?i have also more technical stufff on my fb page.i dont know much about music theory scales and stuff like that because most of the years ive been self taught by songsterr and youtube videos.im starting to get really serious about this project (teaching guitar) i bought an expensive floyd rose guitar ,line6 podx 500 and i have my books which im going to teach my students with i have also a very nice place to teach with a lot of space and good heating-cooling conditions (air condition for summer and a fireplace-heater for winter) im also 21 years old.the way im thinking to promote my self is by putting flyers in local schools and give really good prices like 30 euros for the first month only and after that 55 euros a month or 45 but being taught in groups of 2 i think it will work for me because playing guitar is what i do everyday anyways and it will actually wont be depressive and dirty like working as a cook. so what do you guys think?
#2
I think you're asking for trouble. As I understand, teaching is something you should have a true passion for, and if you don't have that passion, it will make your life shit. You don't want to teach, you want to play guitar all day instead of working. That's cool, but that doesn't mean you want to teach.

Otherwise I wouldn't personally pick you for a guitar tutor, because:

- you have severe anchoring problems
- you don't know music theory
- because you don't know music theory, you most likely don't understand the books that you are going to teach out of
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
Given what you don't know, what exactly are you going to teach? How to play like you do? In that style?
FWIW, I think you're technically OK, but within what seem very narrow parameters. You have knowledge to impart, no doubt, which should appeal to anyone into the same kind of music who is not as skilled as you are. (I've no idea how many such potential customers you might be able to find.)
But the main issue is that teaching is different kind of skill. Just knowing stuff, or playing well, is not enough. There are way better players than you out there who are still s*** teachers (you see them on youtube all the time).

Not trying to put you off! You sound enthusiastic enough, and I guess those books you have ought to be authoritative enough (within the style you're going to teach). But you need to do some lesson planning. You need to remember what it was like when you didn't know what you know now. (You'll be taking a lot of stuff for granted at the moment, a lot of your knowledge and skill is subconscious - you have to make it conscious again, and put it in order.)

And it would make a lot of sense to study some theory, even if you don't end up teaching it (much). You need to be prepared for any kind of question you might get asked. A teacher who says "er, I dunno" to a beginner question is not likely to make it very far.
#4
backflip36915 I feel like that was my post lol.

So, what kinda restaurant you work in? Is the head chef a cunt? I know what you're going through, but there are worse things in life.

Don't give it up if you have nothing to fall back on financially. Why not find an establishment where you feel inspired and can learn more? GOOD kitchens are not dirty and depressive. Unless you work in a Michelin star establishment like myself. Then they're sparkling clean and depressive.

I've got to be honest, I don't know any chef who does their job for the money. That's not what it's about.

Students who sign up for lessons these days with guitar teachers just want to learn songs. But every now and then, 1 out of 10 or even 20 will rock up wanting to do things "properly", whatever that means, so you must nail some theory to cover your ass.

The better you understand something, the clearer you can put that information across.

That's what students want. Information that's easy to digest, goals that can easily be achieved within certain time spans.

Plan your lesson material, structure. Make sure you have a varied repertoire.
Last edited by mdc at Aug 8, 2016,
#5
im not asking for trouble i want to teach people how to play the guitar i tried once with my brothers but since i forced them and they are not even into music they only lasted a couple of days.i want to see people making bands and playing proper.the books i have are the books i learned guitar 6 years ago with a guitar teacher who ''taught'' me what i know now. i was taught by a teacher only for 2 years so ive been 4 years self taught .these books have not so much theory in them its more of an ''easy-basic theory stuff'' .mdc i work at a hotel but im not into cooking i mean i really dont like it its just an easy but very stressfull and tiring job i dont want to learn more about cooking i just hate it and i get depressed all the time to the point that ive lost 10 kilos.i fully understand the books that im going to teach im also preparing myself for this project.im studying scales and some decent theory also where i live most people cant even pay for guitar classes thats a problem i faced too and thats one of the reasons i went self taught sure there are better teachers than me with degrees and better skills here but you can count them on one hand and they are also pretty expensive (70-100euros for a month) thats why i drop the price at 30 euros for the first month and 55 for the following time or 45 on groups of 2 .im also financially secure since i still live with my parents i just wanna make money doing something i like and thats defenitelly not working as a cook.im not saying there wont be problems im sure there will be but i might love them a little bit more because they are ''my'' problems.
#6
Alanhb i do undestand the books dont worry about that also yes i play a specific style but that doesnt mean i dont know the basics which a beginner should start with
#8
In order to teach decently you really have to be on top of your stuff.

Many teachers are only mediocre players, but they know a lot about music and can approach a lot of material on the level that beginner/intermediate students need. Having solid technique and music theory knowledge are essential. Not every guitar student wants to learn how to read music and do proper exercises, but that is the traditional method that you should be able to teach.
#9
You need to know what is proper technique and what isn't. I'm by no means an expert of guitar technique, but I watched your video and to me it didn't look/sound good enough. I don't know if I would take technical advice from you.

You also need to have a good sense of rhythm and overall a good ear. As a teacher you need to be able to hear when something is not played accurately or not in tune (bends/vibrato). And in the video your playing was sloppy.

If you really want to teach, I would take some lessons for a couple of years and only after that start teaching. As a teacher you don't need to be the most amazing guitarist in the world but you need to know your instrument well enough so that you can give advice to other people. You also need to be versatile enough to be able to give advice to people who want to play other styles of music and have different goals. And you also need to remember that different people learn differently. Something that you take for granted may be really hard for somebody else. (This is why it would be good to know some basic technical exercises. And you also need to know how to practice efficiently and what to focus on when you practice. Some people don't know how to practice and you need to give them advice, and it's not just "play this exercise 3 times". It's also about what to pay attention to when practicing, how to use metronome, what is a good practice routine, that kind of stuff.)

I don't think you are ready to become a teacher yet. As I said, take lessons for a couple of years (tell your teacher that you want to start teaching the guitar soon and maybe he/she can give you some advice) - get rid of your bad habits, train your ear and just become more versatile as a musician (learn some theory too). I would also suggest joining a band (if you don't already play in a band) just to improve your musicianship. A cover band might be a good idea because that way you would automatically learn a lot of different songs and styles.


If you want to start teaching now, start teaching for free and see what it's like. Try it with just one student. After you have some experience, only then start asking money and teaching more people.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#11
Quote by backflip36915
in which part was my playing sloppy?

In "L'arc~en~Ciel" the overdriven lead guitar part in the beginning was a bit sloppy. But even if your playing sounded accurate, my advice would still be the same.

A teacher really needs to know what they are doing. This is why I would advise taking some lessons before starting to teach. You need to know what's proper technique so that you don't teach bad habits to other people.

If you want to know if you are good enough to teach other people, start teaching somebody for free. When it comes to teaching, being an amazing player is not what it's about (obviously you still need to be pretty good at playing your instrument). It's much more important to have good teaching skills. This means, you really need to know what you are doing/talking about, you need to be good at giving clear advice, you need to be able to adapt to new situations and be good at working with different people (i.e. understand that different things work for different people and treat them as individuals), you need to be a versatile musician overall and have a good ear, and you need to have a really good understanding of the basics.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
It all comes down to this in the long run. You know how to play in a limited style (at least that's what I get from your videos). You say you want to teach people to play and play in bands. Are you in a band? What is your experience playing live ? I'm not trying to bring you down but it looks like you hate your current job (understandable most of us do) and you are grasping at straws looking for any way out of your current situation but to be a good guitar teacher you need to know how to play well in many styles so you can take on any student. Playing well in one genre limits your client base tremendously. You also need to know how to teach. Just because you can play doesn't mean you have the skill to teach and if you plan to do it full time and make it your career there are a lot of other things you need to learn about owning a business. I'm referring to basic legal stuff like business licenses, tax situations, long term contracts with your students etc.

All of this can be learned if you are serious. Start learning to play in various styles. Jazz, country, funk, etc. Even if you don't end up teaching your playing ability will be vastly improved. Get out and play live as much as possible. Every good guitar teacher I know is also a professional working musician and as a working musician you need to be ready and available to take any gig offered in almost any style. Teaching is more often a second job that helps when the gigs aren't happening as much as needed.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Aug 9, 2016,
#13
From an old guy, let me start of with the life lessons first. You sound like a stinking millennial who doesn't want to grow up. Everyone who plays the guitar wants to stay home all day and play it in pursuit of getting betting and just feeling they get from playing. It sounds like you have not prepared yourself for the life that is set before you and have not pursued skills that will get you through life. A lot of people have it backwards they want to play hard when they are young and end up working hard when they are old. Work hard and smart when you are young, listen to people who have experience so you can play hard when you are old.

Now on the guitar tutor end. I would not go to you are send my kid to you because you are weak on music theory. Not everyone needs theory but for many it helps them understand what is going on and lets them make the leap to the next step. It gives them that aha moment when they understand the theory behind what they are doing and helps them move around the fret board.

Good luck keep your chin up and I hope you prove me and everyone else wrong
#14
i dont know how you all learned how to play the guitar but it seems like you all been taught by some guitar wizzard like jimmy page or some shit.i started with classical guitar and my teacher just taught me the basics of theory like notes tunings and just the names of the chords after i bought an electric guitar too.i have rarely see him play and only classical guitar which it seemed like he was playing really good for me at that time now i see him just as an average guitar player he never told me about pentatonic scales or sweep picking etc (i also think its pretty hard to sweep on your first 2 years) but i learned how to play without all this theory bullshit.now if anyone wants to be a shredder then i wont teach him because im not a shredder he has to go somewhere else but most people just want to play the damn guitar and thats what im doing now and thats what im going to teach i dont want to make a buisness or make crazy incomes i just want to make some money on the side doing what i love my prices are cheap MaggaraMarine you either talk about the pintch harmonics which are part of the song or one of us is deaf Rickholly74 i cant be in a band because of my job its time consuming and there are no day offs but im planinng to start a band on september when i quit my job gsplsngr i will prove you wrong
#15
Dude surely you don't work 30 days straight? Everyone should get their 2 days off a week.

Thought about applying as a breakfast chef? That way you'll get your late afternoons and evenings free.
#16
2 days off a week is a dream especially in summer i dont know how it is in america but thats how things work here.again i wouldnt do it long term even with 2 days off because its something i do not enjoy
#17
Quote by backflip36915
i dont know how you all learned how to play the guitar but it seems like you all been taught by some guitar wizzard like jimmy page or some shit.i started with classical guitar and my teacher just taught me the basics of theory like notes tunings and just the names of the chords after i bought an electric guitar too.i have rarely see him play and only classical guitar which it seemed like he was playing really good for me at that time now i see him just as an average guitar player he never told me about pentatonic scales or sweep picking etc (i also think its pretty hard to sweep on your first 2 years) but i learned how to play without all this theory bullshit.now if anyone wants to be a shredder then i wont teach him because im not a shredder he has to go somewhere else but most people just want to play the damn guitar and thats what im doing now and thats what im going to teach i dont want to make a buisness or make crazy incomes i just want to make some money on the side doing what i love my prices are cheap MaggaraMarine you either talk about the pintch harmonics which are part of the song or one of us is deaf Rickholly74 i cant be in a band because of my job its time consuming and there are no day offs but im planinng to start a band on september when i quit my job gsplsngr i will prove you wrong


Classical guitar and electric guitar are pretty different. Sweep picking is not a classical guitar technique so that's why your teacher didn't show you how to do it. Same thing with the pentatonic scale - it's not used that much in classical guitar music.

Also, theory is not bullshit. You can learn to play without it but I would expect a teacher to have a good understanding of music. Remember that people are individuals. As a teacher you need to treat them as such. Different things work for different people and some people need to learn some theory to make sense of the music that they play.


To me it kind of feels like you don't understand what it takes to become a teacher. Maybe I'm a bit biased because I'm a to-be music theory teacher (right now I'm studying at a university) so my standards for a good teacher may be pretty high and I know you won't become a teacher in a day.

I'm somebody that knows my shit when it comes to theory and in the beginning I had trouble with teaching the kids. And I do think I'm also kind of a natural teacher - I mean, I have the passion and I like helping others. But my first lessons weren't really that great and I had a lot to learn. And after two years of teaching, I still do. And consider that I'm studying at a university where people give me advice on how to improve. My point is, becoming good at teaching, even if we are talking about the very basics, is not easy. You need to think stuff through and be self-critical, and I think you need to be passionate and committed to it. This is why I would advise to start with only one student and just give the lessons for free. This way you don't need to worry that much about the quality of your lessons (I mean, they are free so if you suck at teaching it really doesn't matter) and you have more time to focus on your student. In the beginning when everything is new, this is important.


When it comes to the sloppy playing, no, it wasn't the pinch harmonics, it was your rhythm. You were slightly inaccurate. But that's not a big deal really.


Also, you are only 21. You have time to study some more music and become a better guitarist and overall a better musician. I would also spend some time studying some basic teaching methods. Join a band, learn different styles, train your ear.

Based on what I have read/heard in this thread, you are not ready yet. But in a couple of years you may be. But if teaching is not your passion, I don't think you should teach. As I said, teaching requires commitment.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#18
I'd say the essential skills for a teacher are

-Competent technique
-Ability to learn music by ear
-Ability to read music
-Knowledge of music theory

These things are entirely doable, and most people who take music seriously benefit tremendously from attaining those skills.

Remember that teaching is a whole lot more than just showing someone how to play some songs. Nobody needs a teacher just to look up tabs and demo videos. You have to be able to explain music, not just demonstrate it.

Learning by ear is also really important, because you need to be able to hear what mistakes students make, as well as be able to get a quick grasp on they want to learn. It's hard to teach music if you haven't fully digested the sound of it. Being able to hear rhythm accurately is a musician's most valuable skill, and you should be able to listen to something and say immediately "that's three 16th notes on the 4th beat". To be an effective teacher, you have to know the music better than your students, even when you don't have much time.

I remember a lesson once when my teacher had planned to get me started on a particularly complicated song I liked, but he didn't prepare and was basically just reading the tab from a magazine alongside me. It's like, I could have done that at home.

It's just really important that you know music in general better than your students, even if you have to learn new songs for them. The only way you can digest nw music that quickly is by having technique, good ears, knowledge of theory, and in some cases the ability to read music.
#19
MaggaraMarine i said i also took electric guitar lessons alongside with classical guitar of course they are different the tequniques im reffering are for electric guitar.you say you are studying at a university.there is proof that university is actually a scam there are a lot of subjects which are totally not needed and most times have nothing to do with what you wanna learn i ve gone to a university and yes i am a dropout laugh at me all you want and yes most subjects i studied had nothing to do with music technology and i was putting myself in huge dept too it was actually a waste of money and time i know there are a lot of people that will argue with that but just make a quick search on the net.on the other hand if you have enough money or you think the subjects are exactly what you need and are totally neccesery then go for it maybe you are studying at the best university or you are the exception.i will only teach beginners if any student wants to be a shredder or study music theory im gonna be clear from the beginning.im trying to become better at it everyday.
#20
That's all good and well, to limit your scope, but what exactly do you have to teach? Who cares about J-rock in Spain?

Frankly, I think you lack perspective. That music technology wasn't for you has nothing to do with the usefulness of music studies. You can sell yourself as a beginner teacher, and maybe you'll do alright, but a good teacher is not just a matter of teaching ability; it is also a matter of personal skill. People like consistency in teachers, and if your skill is only so much, you may hold up students who are faster learners than you by not being able to describe their actions.