#1
Hi I have a MIM fender standard stratocaster HSS with floyd Rose but I'm thinking of trading it for a les Paul type guitar. I saw this used 1998 Korean epiphone les Paul and the guy is willing to give it to me plus 165€ should I make this trade. I'm also a little scared of regretting it because I hear that les Paul guitars are harder to play.
Here's the guitar:
https://img.olx.pt/images_olxpt/856507787_2_1000x700_ephiphone-les-paul-1997-made-in-korea-imagens.jpg
https://img.olx.pt/images_olxpt/856507787_1_1000x700_ephiphone-les-paul-1997-made-in-korea-viseu.jpg
https://img.olx.pt/images_olxpt/856507787_3_1000x700_ephiphone-les-paul-1997-made-in-korea-instrumentos-musicais.jpg
#2
I would say that both guitars offer pros and cons to different play styles, so to say one is harder than the other is subjective.

Overall I think the trade is fair, but their different guitars. If you haven't played a LP you should try to play one before you make the trade.
'16 Gibson LP Standard T, '15 Epi LP Standard with 57/57+ Gibbys
Blackstar S1-45, Marshall DSL100H, JetCity JCA50H
#3
DirtFarmer I play mostly hard rock which involves fast licks and I'm beginning to develop my legato technique but I also play blues and jazz what guitar would you say is more appropriate for that?
#4
Quote by adelino316
DirtFarmer I play mostly hard rock which involves fast licks and I'm beginning to develop my legato technique but I also play blues and jazz what guitar would you say is more appropriate for that?


While both of them can handle all 3 genre, I'd say that a Les Paul leans more towards Rock and the Strat more towards Blues & Jazz.
Can you play the guitar before you buy it ?
If you can't:
Do you prefer the Singlecoils or Humbucker of your Strat?
Keep in mind that the Les Paul doesn't have Singlecoils.
Last edited by juvion at Aug 10, 2016,
#7
Generally speaking, a standard LP isn't your first choice for "fast licks and... legato technique".
You're fighting a clunky neck heel beginning behind the 16th fret that makes it uncomfortable to work in the upper reaches. You're generally working with a 12" radius (and *barely* that, as actually measured, on the Gibson copies) and medium or medium jumbo frets. And it's a 22 fret guitar.

I actually work with an LP-style guitar that cures a lot of those issues (I've got a black one and a white one, with the latter also sporting a sustainer).
And I've a more expensive neck-through construction guitar with a shaved neck heel and a tummy cut that helps even more. But none of these are Epiphones. And they all have Floyds.

This is the back of one of the neck-through guitars. Take a look at a stock LP for comparison:



For what you're playing, the back of the guitar can be nearly as important as the front. These guitars have a "tilted" neck heel that works nearly as well as the Gibson Axcess in terms of giving your thumb a nice place to live.



And they have 24-fret necks in which the 24th fret is where the 22nd fret would normally be on a typical LP. In short, more frets free of the body.




In addition, they arrive with jumbo frets and a 14" radius fretboard. Unfortunately, the black guitar is no longer a stock item, though they pop up on Craigslist and eBay now and again.
Last edited by dspellman at Aug 10, 2016,