#1
Hey all

So many years ago i bought a guitar - in fact around 25-26 years ago. It HAD the most exquisite sound. It was a Rhapsody from Australia - in the round back shape of an Ovation.

The sad part is i haven't played it in probably 20 years. Ok so here's the problem. The neck is PERFECT. The action is awesome. if i capo at first and hold down at the last fret the high of the strings is just great. BUT, the rise, when the strings are depressed at the last fret, to the bridge is crazy.

The net effect is when tuning the strings are in PERFECT tune. When playing a chord it is out. If i tune to the chord it is perfect, BUT as soon as i release it is out.

Get what i am saying? I am hoping the pics can show. SO what i see is obviously i need to adjust the bridge. BUT the bridge itself is pretty low in the groove as it is so i can't shave it off. The only remedy i can see is to shave the bridge, then file the "bone" so i can lower it.




#2
I'm guessing that the guitar is not worth big $, in which case shaving the bridge and then lowering the saddle is a reasonable option. You might also want to cut ramps between the pin holes and the saddle, to get more string break angle over the saddle.


Some pics of the guitar from the top, especially the bridge, would be interesting, just to get an idea of what the whole guitar looks like.
#3
Hi Tony

When i bought it it wasn't "cheap" as first guitars would go, but i think as one progresses so you outgrow and move on. BUT i guess having become a LOT better I can now hear things i didn't hear before. I don't want to get rid of this guitar for obvious reasons.






#5
Hey Tony

It is just less than 5mm. Around 4.8mm or 4.9mm. I guess that's about 0.188"

Quote by Tony Done
OK, what is the action height at the 14th fret, 1st string?
#6
I aim for 1.6 to 1.8 mm, 1st string 14 the fret, and to get that you would have to take (4.8 - 1.8) x 2 = 6.0 mm of the bridge and saddle. I don't think that is feasible, looking at how much saddle is left. I'm guessing that it would not be feasible to do a conventional neck reset on it, and even if it was it would cost about Oz$500. You could attempt a reset by cutting a wedge out of the heel. I've done it on a nylon string, but I have no idea how it would go on a neck with a truss rod. I play slide, so if it were mine is would convert it to lap steel, not what you wanted to hear.
#7
hmmm nope not what i wanted to hear lol but i do hear you. the body appears to be fiberglass. How would I part the kneck from the body? It looks as if it is glued onto the body.

Quote by Tony Done
I aim for 1.6 to 1.8 mm, 1st string 14 the fret, and to get that you would have to take (4.8 - 1.8) x 2 = 6.0 mm of the bridge and saddle. I don't think that is feasible, looking at how much saddle is left. I'm guessing that it would not be feasible to do a conventional neck reset on it, and even if it was it would cost about Oz$500. You could attempt a reset by cutting a wedge out of the heel. I've done it on a nylon string, but I have no idea how it would go on a neck with a truss rod. I play slide, so if it were mine is would convert it to lap steel, not what you wanted to hear.
#8
Quote by shearder
When i bought it it wasn't "cheap" as first guitars would go, but i think as one progresses so you outgrow and move on. BUT i guess having become a LOT better I can now hear things i didn't hear before. I don't want to get rid of this guitar for obvious reasons.

....[ ]....


If you look at the photo I extracted from your set, you can see how badly the sound board has collapsed in front of the bridge. Unless it's an optical illusion, (I don't think it is), that's what has allowed the neck to rotate upward.

Were you to attack the bridge,(the "bridge" is the wood part, the plastic or "bone part is the saddle), or both as it were, it would likely leave you with an upward string trajectory toward the top nut, which is disastrous for sound, sustain, play-ability, or what have you.

OK, so I did a search about Ovation neck reset. The best I can do is post the link to the YouTube page: Since without our edit button, I can't post a video you can watch on this page. (Don't ask). In any event the Ovation being repaired DOES have a bolt on neck.

I have no idea if that follows through to your copy model. But it's worth "looking into", (the sound guitar's hole that is), to find out. With a bolt neck, you would have to machine a couple of very fine tapered wedges, and bolt the neck back onto the guitar body with those wedges in between. Not the easiest thing in the world to do, but not a $500.00 neck reset either.

Tony Done Dear lord, you Aussies are as ruthless as the Japanese when you copy something. That guitar has a "lawsuit headstock" if I've ever seen one.

EDIT: The "EDIT" seems to be fixed.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 14, 2016,
#9
Quote by shearder
Hey Tony

It is just less than 5mm. Around 4.8mm or 4.9mm. I guess that's about 0.188"
Ideally, an average for the action on the E-6 side should be about .10", which is about 1/2 of what you've got. That's what's causing the tuning issues. The string has to bend too far, and thus raises in pitch too much when fretted. It's called "intonation" problems.

I see the 12 string in your photo(s). Do you play that much?
#10
Hey Captaincranky thanks for your replies. Yeah the 12 string is a Washburn. I truly and atIreland than I do bug it's time. I guess I play the nylon more and the Fender Strat

The guitar I want you repair yes that pic is an optical illusion. It's perfectly flat fortunately. I'll check the video though
#11
Quote by shearder
...[ ]...The guitar I want you repair yes that pic is an optical illusion. It's perfectly flat fortunately. I'll check the video though
Whether or not the sound board is flat, that guitar does need a neck reset. You can tell by how little of the saddle is showing above the bridge, So please, do check the video, and look inside and hop that your guitar has a bolt on neck as well.
#12
Captaincranky

I would bet that it is an epoxied joint that cannot be cost-effectively reset.

Shearder, I did this one by taking e wedge out of the heel, gluing it back at the new angle, then disguising the mess with faux ebony made from epoxy and black powder paint:



However, that one didn't have a truss rod, so it was possible to saw close to the fretboard. With a truss rod you would have to think of a way of getting the timber out from around it.
Last edited by Tony Done at Aug 15, 2016,
#13
Provided the relief is good the other solution is to dispense with the current bridge and use a tailpiece arrangement. You can use a much lower bridge/saddle and slide/angle it anywhere you get best intonation.