#1
Very long time without posting but I'm in dire need of some new music to learn and figured that the forums that helped me learn guitar as an adolescent have any advice to help me progress a bit further. In case anyone remembers me from way back when, I've been sober for quite some time now and I'm slowly working to overcome my depression.

I'm looking for some recommendations on dark sounding pieces for classical or flamenco guitar. Thus far the only pieces I've found are Danze Arabe/Arabian Dance by Sabicas (the former is an inspired cover by Grisha Goryachev) and Villa Lobos Etude no 1. I know a couple of more cheerful pieces that I learned for developing tremolo and rasgeado techniques and want to learn bits and pieces from darker, more mysterious and evil sounding things to try get inspiration for developing my own style a little further. Any recommendations are appreciated - ideally with youtube links. Thank you very much

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#2
The Spanish Dances by Granados, I think the second one in particular is one I'm remembering. There's also Capricho Arabe & Capricho Catalan and one of my personal favorites, La Catedral
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Last edited by megano28 at Aug 11, 2016,
#3
Listening through the Spanish dances now, the other three you mentioned were definitely good suggestions - Capricho Arabe will have to be the next piece I attempt to learn. Thank you very much!

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#4
Asturias (Leyenda) by Isaac Albeniz is a very powerful "dark" sounding piece that may be what you're looking for.

The piece in it's entirety is advanced, I would say, but is very beautiful and rewarding to learn.



It's also vaguely flamenco-ish

Koyunbaba is probably the darkest piece that I know of, and it's one of my favorite pieces of all time. Here's the incredible fourth movement at 9:15:



Each movement is fantastic
My God, it's full of stars!
#6
Dreadnought thank you for the recommendations, I just started learning Asturias a few days ago - I know the notes to the first few minutes of it and I'm working on getting it down a bit less sloppy at the moment...much to the dismay of my grandparents who are trying to sleep upstairs. If only I had checked these forums more regularly I may have started learning Asturias a little sooner, truly beautiful. Listening through Koyunbaba as we speak, I can't wait to add this to my little repertoire.

I started learning Rondo Alla Turca too, simply because I realised that I only know dark, evil or depressing songs on classical guitar; with electric its easy to improvise some cliché rock/metal riffs that are relatively upbeat and not sound like utter shite - but on classical everything has to be rather more eloquent and my technique hasn't reached a point where I can improvise anything I'm happy with yet. Definitely more satisfying though I must say!

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#7
Try "La Filla Del Marxant"

It's a lighter piece that has technical nuances that make it great to play.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Anyway I have technically statutory raped #nice

Quote by EndThecRinge51
once a girl and i promised to never leave each other

since that promise was broken

i dont make promises any more
#8
I'd urge you to look into the following composers. Federico Moreno Torroba, his Nocturno specifically and the first of his Pieces Caracteristiques; Preambulo, is somewhat to what you seem to be looking for. William Walton has also written for guitar on rare occasion, his Five Bagetelles are quite good. If I remember correctly the 2nd is in your area, though all of them are very much worth listening to, if not playing them. Marco Pereira's work, if you can find it, Plainte (Lamento), is another attempt. Maybe, though I'm not sure if dark enough for you, Abel Carlevaro's work Preludios Americanos 3 - Campo.

So by and large, look into the impressionists among the composers. Some nationalistic music can also have what you need, as also pointed to by some of the other posters above here. If you cannot read sheet music, there's very likely recordings, or TABs for most of these.

Good luck
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