#1
Hi there,

I've been playing my guitar for almost a year (though i did take a long break for a couple of months). Right now, I'm working through Hal Leonard's Guitar Method (book 2). I try to complete all the exercises/songs in the book by working my way up to 100 beats per minute (I use a metronome), but I don't understand how I'm supposed to play a sixteenth note (well, chord) and a sixteenth rest in a single beat (at 100 bpm). The rest doesn't seem very noticeable to me when I'm playing at this speed, so I just choose to play the sixteenth note (chord) instead (I assume that the amount of time it takes me to switch to the chord is considered the sixteenth rest?).

EDIT: I mean to say that I simply play the (sixteen note) chord instead of actually muting the strings (for the sixteenth rest) and playing the (sixteenth note) chord*
Am I supposed to do it like this, or am I doing something wrong?

Hope you understand what I'm trying to say.. sorry for making it very confusing

Thanks
Last edited by thecookiemaster72 at Aug 14, 2016,
#2
By the way, sixteenth notes are 2 notes per beat.. right?

because that's what I'm trying to describe
Last edited by thecookiemaster72 at Aug 14, 2016,
#4
Count sixteenth notes like this:

One-e-and-a-Two-e-and-a-Three-e-and-a-Four-e-and-a

Is the chord on the beat ("One"/"Two"/"Three"/"Four") or on the 8th note between the beats ("and") or on a sixtheenth note between them ("e"/"a")? What about the rest? Could you take a picture of the rhythm and post it here?
Quote by AlanHB
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
You'll probably be much better at 16th notes when you've reviewed what they are.

And are you counting? Always count. Whatever you're trying to play, you should take it down to 60bpm and count it. Just count and clap the notes so you get the rhythm before you try to play it on guitar.