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#1
Do you have books that you are ready to read and read again? Not only because it's interesting and funny, or you still have feeling that murderer is not janitor I mean more deep, more life changing experience. One of the books that changed my life is "Escape from Freedom" by Erich Fromm. I've read it pretty much thirty times and highly recommend.

Do you have books that changed you?

#2
Got this for christmas, it's actually helped with anxiety and perspective.

o()o

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#3
lmao nawwwww
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Another year lost to the blue line
#4
I have read some books for sure that may have changed my outlook on a particular subject or event or even my way of thining to some extent but as far as any books changing my life in any major way I can't say that any have.

I have read a plethora of trume crime books about mass murder, serial murder, etc. Several of which were witten by various members of the F.B.I. and some who worked closely with them in the late 70's and early 80's to interview as many serial and mass murderers as possible also serial sexual offenders, assassins etc. These interviews and the information compliled from them were disected, studied and ultimately used to create what we know today as criminal profiling as seen on CSI, Criminal Minds etc. Pretty fascinating stuff from the people who actually came up with the process. I guess reading all of these crime books made me a bit more protective of my kids and now grandkids after readding about how much deprevity their really is within the human race.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

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Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#7
Johnny Got His Gun and The Myth of Syphillis were pretty influential, though I've matured past both of them.

Quote by Evilnine
I have read some books for sure that may have changed my outlook on a particular subject or event or even my way of thining to some extent but as far as any books changing my life in any major way I can't say that any have.
Actually yes this. I can point to lots of very significant but faceted influences but nothing that has had any sort of biblical effect on me.

also pls be joking about Atlas Shrugged
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Last edited by Banjocal at Aug 15, 2016,
#8
Quote by Banjocal
Johnny Got His Gun and The Myth of Syphillis were pretty influential, though I've matured past both of them.

Actually yes this. I can point to lots of very significant but faceted influences but nothing that has had any sort of biblical effect on me.

also pls be joking about Atlas Shrugged


not actually,
maybe I was too young and naive, but after this book I'm kind of started my own life, the one that I like and enjoy =)
i know that there are a lot of opinions about Atlas Shrugged, but it worked pretty good for me
#9
Quote by Banjocal


also pls be joking about Atlas Shrugged


pls be joke, it will ruin my image of ug forever pls
o()o

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yes every night of my entire life i go to bed crying because i wasnt born american
#10
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pls be joke, it will ruin my image of ug forever pls


it's not like whole UG, it's me only
#12
a brothers journey

or a child called "it"

it's about child abuse experienced by the author, really disturbing stories that based on true events in his life and his brothers life!
i read both in middle-school, so they messed me up pretty good
i'll probably never read them again, but they have definitely left a "scar" on me
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#14
Quote by Banjocal
Johnny Got His Gun and The Myth of Syphillis were pretty influential, though I've matured past both of them.


i c wat u did there
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#15
The Bhagavad Gita

and

The Alchemist
I won't slave for beggars pay, likewise gold and jewels. But I would slave to learn the way, to sink your ship of fools.
#16
The Mythic Past by Thomas Thompson
Epiphone | Fender | Schecter | Squier | Marshall | Crate | Boss | Yamaha

◆ Solid State and Digital by choice ◆

I think I'm on the wrong planet.

"There are no haunted houses or cursed places, just haunted minds filled with dark spaces."
#17
Guns, Germs, and Steel really opened my eyes about world inequality
PM me for newts
#18
Quote by Aeolian Harmony
i c wat u did there
Honestly I'm reading some Ranciere right now and it's really starting to hit home how passively I read sentences - half way through I seem to shut off and stop linking the meaning

OR

this book is poorly written or poorly translated

I don't even know anymore, these fucking french philosophers
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#19
can't really say any have changed my life
all i really read is dystopian and horror fiction

i guess The Anxiety Disease helped me understand my anxiety a little more, despite being written over 30 years ago

also Stephen King's It. it's the book that got me into reading in the first place, and is still my favorite. i've read it 6 times
#20
Quote by Banjocal
Honestly I'm reading some Ranciere right now and it's really starting to hit home how passively I read sentences - half way through I seem to shut off and stop linking the meaning

OR

this book is poorly written or poorly translated

I don't even know anymore, these fucking french philosophers


Continentals are too fruity, analytics are too boring and tedious. Give up, drop out, and practice dem scales and arpeggios?
Quote by Skibolky
No one can really fuck with the power of empathy.
#22
I've never been able to get too emotionally attached to books. Maybe I'm just a bad reader but the medium just doesn't affect me as much as a good movie, TV show or album. I also have a hard time bringing myself to re-read or re-watch things that I really enjoyed. It's like I have this perfect memory of them and am afraid that I won't feel the same after the second time.
#23
Quote by Aeolian Harmony
Continentals are too fruity, analytics are too boring and tedious. Give up, drop out, and practice dem scales and arpeggios?
nah I'm actually getting a lot further by reading very slowly. And making the odd venture to the liner notes. To be fair to him, he's very rigorous.
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#24
Huh, I'll have to give him a go one day. My only familiarity with him is by way of Althusser.
Quote by Skibolky
No one can really fuck with the power of empathy.
#26
Carlos Casteneda stuff, not realizing he was full of it at the time.

I guess Jonathan Livingston Seagull may have got me into skydiving in a subliminal way
#27
The Disaster Artist

im not joking
bawitaba a bang a bang diggy diggy diggy sed the boogie sed up jump the boogie
#28
Quote by StewieSwan
Guns, Germs, and Steel really opened my eyes about world inequality


Good choice. "The World is Flat" by Friedman is another interesting read.

I also enjoyed "The Little Book of Coaching: Motivating People to Be Winners" by Shula and Blanchard.

And several hundred others, hard to just pick one or two.

People dissing "Atlas Shrugged" are taking it too seriously. Like anything else, you take the useful parts that you can apply and ignore the rest.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Aug 15, 2016,
#29
tbh Animal Farm really fucked me up when I was 14 or 15. It was a really visceral, horrifying feeling of, almost like personal betrayal after I finished it. Like an emotional gut-punch that not much else can come close to. It's hard to explain.

It is also my best go-to example of the difference between enjoying something and being entertained by it. Because it was a horrible feeling.
It's also a good example of reading the same book being a different experience at different ages.
Last edited by Shield150 at Aug 15, 2016,
#30
120 days in Sodom was life changing in that it took me a year before I could read another book. Think it brought on some sort of PTSD with reading lol.

War & Peace wasn't life changing but I was so into it and by the end I was adamant it is the greatest book ever written. Jack Kerouac and Hunter S Thompson books were great also as they showed me that there are no conventions to writing.
#31
Freakonomics - Steven Levitt...one of my most influential reads, illustrated the usefulness and efficacy of thinking like an economist, and considering the impact/consequence of human incentives.
The Tipping Point - Malcom Gladwell... similar to Freakonomics, showed how flawed conventional wisdom is and how it needs to be questioned.
Siddhartha - Herman Hesse... the ultimate perspective on life and personal growth.
Brahms: A Biography - Jan Swafford... enriched my understanding of what it means to be an artist.
Steve Jobs - Walter Isaacson... enriched my understanding of what it means to be an entrepreneur.
The Four Hour Workweek - Tim Ferriss... radical ideas on career progression / goals.
I Will Teach You To Be Rich - Ramit Sethi... sage and practical advice on personal finance and financial goals. Helped me automate my financial management.

Currently reading Think And Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill, it's a bit outdated but the fundamentals are as true today as when they were written.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#32
Australian Musical Examinations Board - Piano for leisure series Grade 3
A poem.
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#33
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lol that reminds me...

The Well-Tempered Clavier volumes and 6 Sonatas/Partitas for Solo Violin by JS Bach... to this day still my bibles

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#34
Quote by Arby911
People dissing "Atlas Shrugged" are taking it too seriously. Like anything else, you take the useful parts that you can apply and ignore the rest.
if I wanted to read individualist philosophy I'd take from Stirner or someone similarly worth considering
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#37
i have a real soft spot for loss-of-boyhood-innocence stories because of the outsiders by se hinton. of any single novel it's probably had the biggest influence on me.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#38
idk, not life changing, but the entire Hitchhiker's Guide series is probably one of my my all-time favorite books.
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#39
Quote by luvs2gro
The Bhagavad Gita

and

The Alchemist

Yes both of these! And the dhamapada. Also the book gorgon, which proposed that a 6 degree rise in global temperature in the permian, 250 million years ago, caused the oceans to evaporate and the exposed ocean beds to oxydise robbing the oxygen from the atmosphere causing 90 percent of the oceanic species to go extinct
Last edited by geo-rage at Aug 15, 2016,
#40
i don't read books twice, too much wasted effort. I will watch a movie multiple times though because that takes no effort.


Into The Wild affected me a lot though, pretty much why I'm on track to graduate a year early with a semester of college credits. Gotta get going and experience some real shit, why waste time?
Last edited by ehbacon at Aug 15, 2016,
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