#1
Hi guys. Just stumbled on the Nashville numbering system today in response to oa friend asking what musicians meant by "numbering system".

I've watched a couple of videos on it. Kind of like the Roman numeral system, without the Roman numerals, just using normal numbers. Seems to be for describing simple tunes, chord progressions, and the odd lick.

Has anyone seriously used this? How commonly used is it, outside Nashville? Would anyone try and notatae the same level of detail using it that can be expressed using guitar tab or music notation?

Thanks.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Aug 15, 2016,
#2
It's pretty much a chord chart with numbers instead of note names (and often basic rhythmic info).

YMMV, but nothing replaces notation for specific info.

Not sure about its usage, definitely not in classical circles but outside that, for the learned player, probably.
#4
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Hi guys. Just stumbled on the Nashville numbering system today in response to oa friend asking what musicians meant by "numbering system".

I've watched a couple of videos on it. Kind of like the Roman numeral system, without the Roman numerals, just using normal numbers. Seems to be for describing simple tunes, chord progressions, and the odd lick.

Has anyone seriously used this? How commonly used is it, outside Nashville? Would anyone try and notatae the same level of detail using it that can be expressed using guitar tab or music notation?

Thanks.


Sure,

I've taught it for years as a basic adjunct to the Roman Numeric System of Analysis. It's efficient and modern, but like any language, it needs to be clear to all that use it. Instead of analysis, it's a shorthand form of "charting". I don't use it much simply because no one else I know uses it. But if I were in Nashville I'm sure its used all the time.

It is part of a lecture I teach at the Academy, however, just to touch upon most things that I think someone might happen upon or even want to utilize at some point.

I'm surprised that youve never heard of it, Jerry. How about Nashville Tuning?

Best,

Sean