#1
Hey so I made a solo and was wondering if you guys could give it a listen and give me some feedback. iv been playing for a little over a year and im basically learning by myself (with the help of youtube videos of course) so it would be of tremendous help if you could give me some pointers or suggestions on my playing. i dont have a teacher to give me criticism so im counting on you!

Thanks!

#2
Timing timing timing.

With a groove like this, you should think of a beat as uneven counts.

Breaking into six parts ("|" = halfway):
Normal counting, main breaks are (in bold):
1 - - | - - 2 - - | - -

(furthermore, this is usually broken down in 2^n pieces, like 2 eighths, 4 sixteenths, 8 32nds, etc.)

Swung/groove:
1 - - | - - 2 - - | - -

(this is usually broken down into 3*2^n pieces, like 3 eighth triplets, 6 sixteenth triplets, 12 32nd triplets, etc.
However, to keep 4/4 as opposed to 12/8 feel, just keep to long-short stuff on 1 and 5 within a 6-count beat)
#3
NeoMvsEu Im fairly knew to guitar so i honestly dont know what your saying haha but i did notice that the solo seemed rushed. thanks for the advice though ill see what i can do to fix it.
#4
Most songs have straight duple/quadruple rhythm (you can divide it into 2, 4, 8, 16, etc. if you wanted):







But some don't. I can't think of other examples, so here:


If you count, you hear an (all things take the same amount of time) BUM . ba DUM . ba BUM . ba DUM . ba sort of feel, it's uneven. This is how your song feels. Your playing should go along with this.
#5
NeoMvsEu is there any point in my solo that it fits the rhythm that i can see the difference? or which parts are really bad?
#6
Just listened through the entire thing.
The straight feel is through your entire solo.
Also, it sounds more like random noodling than a well-structured solo.
#7
You are playing straight 16ths over swung 16ths. It didn't really bother me as much as it bothered Neo. But you want to be aware of that. You can make the conscious decision to play straight over swing and sometimes it sounds cool, but you don't want to do it all the time/without being aware of it because that makes it sound unintentional.

What is the difference between straight and swing? Well, straight 8ths/16ths are even. But when you have swung 8ths/16ths, the first 8th/16th note lasts longer than the second one.

You don't count swing like "one-and-two-and-three-and-four-and". It's more like "one---and-two---and-three---and-four---and" (or in your case when we are talking about 16th notes, it would be 1--e-&--a-2--e-&--a-3--e-&--a-4--e-&--a).

This is straight:



This is swing:



Well, a bit different kind of groove than your backing track, but gives you a good idea of straight vs swing.

You can hear a 16th swing groove for example here. Listen to the hi-hat (you can hear the "1--e-&--a-2--e-&--a..." thing pretty clearly, 1 and 2 being the kick and snare drum).




When it comes to other things than the rhythm, to me it sounded a bit "generic". Not really bad (I mean, you didn't really play wrong notes or anything like that, though some of the notes you played over chord changes were not chord tones so they didn't fit perfectly, but they weren't bad clashes either) but not that good either. You used pretty simple/generic licks and it got a bit repetitive (which also had to do with the fact that most of it was based on the same rhythmic idea). Maybe play less notes and try to make your phrases sound more "meaningful". You want to have more variety in the solo. But you've been playing for a year and I wouldn't really expect to hear anything mind blowing.

Did you like your solo?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 18, 2016,
#8
MaggaraMarine i like the solo, I mean iv only been playing for a year so for me i though it was the best with my ability. i did notice the timing was off a bit so i need to work on that. im not too educated in guitar theory i know enough to get by but im not fluent. im still trying to learn all that i can. but thanks for the feedback. agian im kinda just learning off of youtube videos. i dont have a teacher so this is very helpful Thank you!
#9
is it possible that any of you guys could post a solo to this backing just so i can see the difference.maybe learn a few licks and how to very it so i doesn't sound so repetitive. that would help alot.
#10
Follow the accents on the track. This uses what's called swing rhythm, which has a shuffling sound. When you play the triplets at 1:29, that's more like the basic rhythm that this backing track uses. Listen to some blues tunes to get a good idea of what swing rhythm sounds like.

I'd also recommend using less effect on the guitar. Excessive overdrive can masks poor dynamics, and chorus masks out-of-tune notes, so it's hard to evaluate your playing completely when the guitar is saturated with effects.

Since you've only been playing a year I wouldn't expect you to have a solid sense of phrasing/melody yet, but to get there, I'd recommend really listening to the rhythm and feel of the track and try work with it. Pause sometimes to think about what you want to play in the next phrase. Singing or humming along with your guitar while you play is a great way to keep yourself mentally engaged to the melody. Avoid getting stuck in your own head, too, by looking around once in a while and consciously focusing on the groove.
#11
cdgraves Thanks for the advice brotha. As far as the tone goes im still trying to figure out one that sounds good. Im using the garageband app on my phone so the quality is not very good. It doesnt give me many options and so i have to try my best to get it to sound decent. For the Pauses is there any techniques i can try. when i solo i usually end up just playing and playing and playing with very few breaks in between.
#12
Quote by kevdub94
cdgravesFor the Pauses is there any techniques i can try. when i solo i usually end up just playing and playing and playing with very few breaks in between.

Use your ears. Listen.

Your problem is that you go on autopilot and just let your fingers do the job. So why not put the guitar down for a moment and just listen to the backing track? Try hearing melodies over it. Try singing a guitar solo that you would like to hear and record that. The guitar doesn't do the expression for you, it needs to come from yourself. Singing is great because that way you are not limited by scale shapes or anything. It happens purely by ear.

You hear melodies in your head. You want to get those melodies out of the instrument. And this doesn't happen by just moving your fingers inside of a scale shape. If you do this, the instrument is what controls you and you don't want that.

What I think may also contribute to your problems is the fact that there's too much stuff to think about. Your fingers may not be that familiar with the scale so a lot of your energy and focus is spent on that. You can't really focus on good note choice, phrasing, rhythm, that kind of stuff. You may want to try to limit your note choice to, let's say, 3 notes, so that you don't need to think about the notes, and only focus on your rhythm or playing musical sounding phrases with those 3 notes. That really forces yourself to be creative.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 19, 2016,
#13
Quote by kevdub94
cdgraves Thanks for the advice brotha. As far as the tone goes im still trying to figure out one that sounds good. Im using the garageband app on my phone so the quality is not very good. It doesnt give me many options and so i have to try my best to get it to sound decent. For the Pauses is there any techniques i can try. when i solo i usually end up just playing and playing and playing with very few breaks in between.


Just stop for a few measures and make sure you know where you are in the form (like what chord is playing at the moment), and think about what you want to hear next. As long as you're not on stage or recording, do whatever you want. Keep yourself really engaged with what the track is doing so you don't get lost in the form or get too absorbed in your own playing.

Think about what you'd want to hear if you were listening to someone play the song. Or, conversely, play as if someone were listening.
Last edited by cdgraves at Aug 19, 2016,
#15
It's quite good for a player who plays for a little over a year
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