#1
Hi....I play classical guitar and I am used to stretching my new strings this way *over tuning or overwinding them two note higher, for example E string as high as sol#...A string to do#, and keep that tension for 24hours by retuning them again as I could within 24 hours* I did not notice anything strange but this time I have a recording session, did I damage my strings? should I replace them? my guitar is comps and the strings DADARIO EJ45....
Thank you.
#2
Urgh, no. DON'T DO THAT EVER! It'll depend whether you stretched the string past its yield strength or not. Most likely not, but don't do that again please. I feel bad for your new strings. The whole stretching new strings thing is a myth btw. Break them in slowly if you want them to last, and don't sweat on them/wipe them if they're plated.
#4
Thank you for your help but there is one more thing I want to mentioned, I remember one of the strings I guess D or A gave some wheeze like sound when I overwinded it, should I just ignore that..I worry just because I will record a new song..
the strings sound and feel normally though.
Last edited by amrmakki2 at Aug 19, 2016,
#5
Sounds like that suggest to me that the guitar was under a lot of strain - timber moving. Maybe you were lucky that the bridge didn't come off! I think it is possible that you have done some structural damage with the high string tension, and perhaps that is what caused the tone changes you first mentioned.
#6
One of the main things to consider on any guitar and especially nylon stringed is to have a good amount of wind on the pegs to keep the tension stable and to prevent slippage. I tune new strings a step below standard concert or open D for a few days before bringing them up to key. I consider this technique to be a factor into why my strings never break.
#7
Quote by skido13
One of the main things to consider on any guitar and especially nylon stringed is to have a good amount of wind on the pegs to keep the tension stable and to prevent slippage. I tune new strings a step below standard concert or open D for a few days before bringing them up to key. I consider this technique to be a factor into why my strings never break.


I tune up to D also before going up to concert - and, indeed, keep one guitar permanently in standard D.

I disagree with you about having lots of wind on the peg though - I go for 2 or 3 max.
#8
Amount of string on the peg is dependant on several factors and is not always needed as you say, 2 or 3 should be enough with the gradual workup.
Nylons could have a certain amount of stretch time before they reach their final timber which some might think is slippage.