#1
So last night I was playing at a venue where there was no electrical grounding and the hum in the amps was practically unbearable, whenever I turned the distortion or boost on it was ridiculously loud. I had a tele I had to use for a couple of songs but it was just impossible with the amount of noise there was.

Is there any solution to this problem I could use in this cases?
#2
i would get a QUALITY power conditioner.

i use APC stuff, pretty cheap, and i never have problems, mine are all battery backup as well. good investment IMO.
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#3
Quote by trashedlostfdup
i would get a QUALITY power conditioner.

i use APC stuff, pretty cheap, and i never have problems, mine are all battery backup as well. good investment IMO.


One of the best gear related investments you can make is a good power conditioner.
Al my gear goes through a power conditioner, sometimes 2.
And many of them can tell you if you have a faulty ground connection.

And what kind of shit hole dive bar has no grounded power outlets?
That would get most businesses shut down.
#4
I'll look into getting one of those then.

CodeMonk

Worst thing was that it was a proper fancy place which host pro musicians regularly so I don't know how the fuck they get away with it, cause' even the mics shocked you if you touched them
#5
Quote by nico_9550
...[ ]....Worst thing was that it was a proper fancy place which host pro musicians regularly so I don't know how the fuck they get away with it, cause' even the mics shocked you if you touched them
Getting shocked by a mic can be a power phasing issue. There's some chance there, an outlet was wired backwards. The wide blade of the plug & amp; socket should be "common" .

With a working ground it's easy to check that out with a simple 115 volt neon test lamp. OK, so everybody knows the round pin of the plug is ground.

When you jump the tester between the wide blade of the socket, you should get no light. Jumping he narrow blade of the socket to ground, should cause the tester to light.. Jumping across the two standard plug pins will tell you absolutely nothing, and you would have to jump the tester to a cold water pipe to tell you which pin is which.

Once upon a time, guitar amps had a power phasing switch, which allowed you to reverse the polarity of the AC plug. That was fine, until you hit something in reverse polarity, which cause line current to run between them.

Just ask Kieth Richards, who was knocked out cold on stage when he touched his electric guitar to a mic stand which was out of phase with the guitar.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 20, 2016,
#6
Firstly, are you sure it was grounding? Maybe not a dodgy cable or just a lot of lighting EMI/power interference? Did you actually have to convert from a 3-prong cord to a 2-prong to get power? Personally I wouldn't play at any venue unless they had proper 3-prong outlets.